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Straight line in castile soap

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penelopejane

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Hi,
I would like to achieve a straight line between two pure castile soaps - one natural and one coloured/scented. They take a long time to set so I was wondering how to do this?

Would I have to wait a few hours between the first and second pour?
Is there a time limit when they will no longer "stick" together?

Would the coloured (maybe scented) section maybe reach trace quicker?
I know adding honey makes it set quicker but it still takes ages in a full pour. Would it be quicker if it is a thin layer?
Would mixing it to a thicker trace make it set quicker?
 

mintle

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I have my method for achieving straight lines in the soap without having to make two separate batches. It does not give perfect result but very close (!) if you are careful enough (I'm usually a bit too impatient, but I have managed to perfect it over time).

The method is similar to CPOP, which means that I pour the first layer (in a medium trace) and put my silicone mold into the pre-heated oven (40-45 degrees of Celcius). This helps for the first layer to set quickly and while it cooks, I prepare my second layer: add scent, colour etc. I usually let the first layer to cook for 3-4 minutes.
I take it out of the oven and again: I carefully spread the second layer, spooning it on the first layer (not pouring from a distance; the second layer is spooned from the close distance so that it does not break through). The rule of thumb here is that you cannot have a thicker trace in the second layer than it was with the first one, because the second layer may submerge being more heavy and the first one will not be able to support it. I even everything out and back to the oven. Then I proceed with the third layer similarly.

This works great if your recipe is not fast-moving one (castile obviously isn't). I have managed to get totally even 5-gradient (5-layer) soap with this method a couple of times. Still, if I am not carefull enough with the spooning the layers may not be as even.

If for some reason you'd like to use separate batches - I have only did it once and I had a 4 hours break between each pour. The two layers sticked together very well. I think the first layer would have been ready for the second pour earlier than in 4 hours but I just had to clean my equipment and if I remember well, I also served dinner to my husband in the meantime :). It is true from my experience that thicker trace means that the soap will set more quickly. But I use my CPOP/modified approach because it is just easier for me and less time-consuming.
 

cmzaha

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The easiest for me is to split the batch, water reduce down a low as a 40% lye solution, add what you want, mix your lye and pour. Wait until you see it beginning to set well enough to hold the second layer mix and pour. I never trust them to stay together well enough if I leave the next layer for hours. One I never do is a pencil line since I have never ever had a pencil line soap not come apart, and I have purchased many and received many pencil line in swaps. All have fallen apart at the line, might take a little time but apart them come
 

penelopejane

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Thank you both very much.
Cmzaha I will avoid the pencil line for sure! The last thing I want is the soap separating! Thank you for the advice.
 

songwind

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https://www.etsy.com/listing/210066391/loaf-mold-with-divider?ref=related_listings

Has anyone used one of these molds to create lines? When would you take the dividers out? Wouldn't they sort of smear and not create a straight line division?
I haven't used one myself, but I have seen plenty of YouTube videos of it. Basically, you pour all your soap into the different "compartments" then take the dividers out smoothly (as close to straight vertical as possible.)

I don't think smearing would be a problem because you'd essentially be smearing the color on itself as it came upward. The soap needs to be fluid enough to settle in together but not so liquid that it just mixes once the barrier is gone.
 

dibbles

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https://www.etsy.com/listing/210066391/loaf-mold-with-divider?ref=related_listings

Has anyone used one of these molds to create lines? When would you take the dividers out? Wouldn't they sort of smear and not create a straight line division?
I have a mold with dividers, and they work well. Take them out as soon as you are done pouring, slowly lifting them straight up. The batter does need to be somewhat fluid. I used them once with an accelerating FO and the batter was so thick that it actually left a space when the dividers were removed. Smacked the mold hard a few times and it went together and I didn't have too many air pockets. You would also want to keep your batter levels even in each of the sections.
 

penelopejane

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I have a mold with dividers, and they work well. Take them out as soon as you are done pouring, slowly lifting them straight up. The batter does need to be somewhat fluid. I used them once with an accelerating FO and the batter was so thick that it actually left a space when the dividers were removed. Smacked the mold hard a few times and it went together and I didn't have too many air pockets. You would also want to keep your batter levels even in each of the sections.
Thanks you both.
Sounds a little complicated : (
 

dibbles

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It's not too hard. Watch a couple of youtube videos for a visual. Like most soapy things, it might take a couple of tries. The only time I had a problem, the batter got VERY thick very fast. Even then, I just banged the mold a few times and did a quick spoon swirl. The soap wasn't the prettiest I've ever made, but it was fine.
 

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