Stearic Spots?

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ibct1969

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Hello and Happy New Year! I have some white spots in my soap that I would love to try to prevent from showing up again in future bars, so I was hoping to get some advice from you all. I have attached a picture of a couple of them. I have read about white spots on this site and found some information about stearic spots (super old, but super helpful information posted in 2010 by Irish Lass!) and I think this is what I have. Based on my recipe and process below, and what you see in the pictures, would you agree?

9 oz lard (30%)
7.50 oz coconut oil] (25%)
12 oz olive oil (pure) (40%)
1.50 castor oil (5%)

4.24 oz lye
11.4 oz frozen goat milk

Mixed goat milk ice cubes w lye a bit at a time until completely melted/dissolved using an ice bath
Brought that to 60 degrees (per Ann Marie's video on making goat milk soap on SoapQueen).
Brought oils to 90 degrees and added BB oatmeal and honey FO
Added lye mixture to oils and stick blended for a good 5-10 minutes but could only get a super light trace
Poured into mold and tamped it down quite a bit
Put it in freezer for about 12 hours
Took it out and let it sit to come to room temp
Unmolded and cut it into bars
A day later the spots appeared on several bars

Thoughts? Are these stearic spots? Can the fat in goat milk cause stearic spots if it's too cold? The soap (including the spots) does not zap. Was the lye/goat milk mixture too cold?

Thanks in advance!

Stearic Spots?.JPG
 

shunt2011

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I'm thinking that the spots may be saponified GM. Adding the lye to the GM s likely causing the fat in the milk to saponify. I quit doing just that for the same reason. I now mix my lye with an equal amount of water and add my milk to the oils. I add powdered milk to the liquid milk to make full milk.
 

earlene

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I am probably far too new to soaping to rule out stearic spots, but I have had those white spots with frozen milk in my lye solution before. They looked just like that.
 

The Efficacious Gentleman

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I don't think it's steric spots either - there isn't usually a problem with lard and steric spots. I would also point the finger at the milk
 

ibct1969

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Hmm, that crazy milk. If I kept it warmer, do you think it would keep those spots from forming?

I am a bit confused about what Shunts process is. "I now mix my lye with an equal amount of water and add my milk to the oils. I add powdered milk to the liquid milk to make full milk." Still pretty new to this so sorry if I'm being dense.
 

mx6inpenn

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Hmm, that crazy milk. If I kept it warmer, do you think it would keep those spots from forming?

I am a bit confused about what Shunts process is. "I now mix my lye with an equal amount of water and add my milk to the oils. I add powdered milk to the liquid milk to make full milk." Still pretty new to this so sorry if I'm being dense.
She is referring to what is sometimes called the split method. Say you have a recipe that calls for 500g NaOH and 1000g water. You can dissolve the lye in 500g of water. Then use 500g milk mixed into the oils for the balance. You can mix powdered milk in the amount needed for 500g into the milk before adding to the oils. This way you are using 100% milk without the hassle of mixing milk and lye.
 

ibct1969

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She is referring to what is sometimes called the split method. Say you have a recipe that calls for 500g NaOH and 1000g water. You can dissolve the lye in 500g of water. Then use 500g milk mixed into the oils for the balance. You can mix powdered milk in the amount needed for 500g into the milk before adding to the oils. This way you are using 100% milk without the hassle of mixing milk and lye.
Ah, ok. I will try that next time. Thanks for the patient clarification. :)
 

shunt2011

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It was explained clearly, thank you! Sometimes it's confusing when trying to explain.
 

The Efficacious Gentleman

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Aye, temperature of the milk won't make too much of a difference- it is the lye actually saponifying the fat in the milk, and getting to a temperature to stop that happening might not be practical when wanting to soap.
 

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