Spilled FO

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Obsidian

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I had roughly 10 oz of FO spill and soak into a wooden dresser when the glass bottle it was in broke. Now the whole house reeks. Is there anything I can put on it to help pull some of the scent out of the wood?

I was thinking about baking soda or coffee. It went unnoticed for a few hours so it really soaked in.
 

Navaria

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Cat litter. Don't laugh. The cheap clay stuff. It's designed to absorb and remove odors. It's strong enough to clean up oil in a driveway, I would think a FO should be no match for it.
 

TeresaT

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I'm also on the cat litter wagon. I use it in my garage to take care of the dog pee odors in the winter time when the dogs are too cold to go out into the yard to "go." Usually, the urine has already dried and the funk is just left over and it pulls the stink right out (as well as the stain). In cases where there is still moisture in the spot, it removes the moisture and the stink. I've tried the clumping kind and the cheap clay kind. The cheap clay kind actually worked better for me in the garage. The nice thing about it is I can then just toss it into the yard around the trees and work it into the soil. It will eventually decompose and become part of the soil (and keep the rabbits away from my bulbs when they bloom). It's not a ton of clay, so it's not inhibiting any growth and the soil around here is mostly clay anyway, so I don't think I'm hurting anything.

ETA: BTW: as an aside, cat litter is so strong at drying things out that it dehydrated the plastic container it was in. I had purchased a plastic container of clumping kitty litter as part of our Shelter In Place kit for work - you know, in case of an emergency when we're stuck in the vault and can't get out -- after three years of not needing it, we moved the container. When the agent picked it up, he got it in the air and moved it about two feet when the thing broke. He was holding the handle and the rest of it was all over the floor! The plastic container became so dry and brittle from the dehydrating nature of the kitty litter that it basically shattered under the weight of the clay. They made me clean it up because (1) I laughed way too loud at the whole thing and (2) the whole kitty litter and bucket was my "brilliant" idea. (I laughed way too much over that little piece of genius, too.)
 
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Obsidian

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I'm surprised about the cat litter, I though all it did was absorb liquid? I covered the area in baking soda a few hours ago, will try the litter is it doesn't work.
Next question, any good ways to get all the scent out of clothing? Turns out quite a bit dripped onto some clothing and a blanket on the floor.
 

Cindy2428

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5* on the cat litter. This is what we use in the hanger to clean-up oil, chemical spills. Much cheaper than the "commercial" cleaners. As far as your clothing is concerned, I would recommend Spot Shot. It is a total petroleum product, and if you can live with that, it should clean the stain and work on the odor. I've never had it fail me when I'm desperate; works exceptionally well on grease.
 

TeresaT

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Obsidian, I would try the kitty litter on the fabric first before going with any kind of chemical cleaner. If you put a layer of litter in a box then lay the item in that and pour more litter on top of the stained area, it might absorb the oils and odor without damaging the fabric more so than any chemical product would. It's worth a shot. I cannot imagine clay doing any kind of damage to a fabric by just sitting on it for a few hours/days. Whereas a chemical may. I've ruined more clothes than I care to think about by using "shout" and other things made specifically for stain removal. The next time I get some kind of oily mess on myself (which I am prone to do as I am a klutz), I'm going to take my own advice and "soak it" in kitty litter first. I hope you get the stain and smell out. (And I hope it's a FO that you actually like. Did you ever read about the time I sprinkled some deodorizer on my carpet and ended up having my house smell like a 19th century wild west imitation french whorehouse? Not a good smell. Better luck to you!!)
 

PuddinAndPeanuts

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Baking soda is great for odors as is white vinegar. When I leave wet clothing in the washer for a week (super musty), I'll put a couple cups of baking soda and a couple cups of vinegar in with it when I re-wash. Just make sure to add them to the water- if you add them both before the water it bubbles up.
 
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