Solid clay masks?

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Dawni

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I want to make some new stuff for the new year. I sell soap, lotion bars and balms currently.

I've been thinking of pucks of clay for some months now.. with EOs (maybe, but need to research more) and whatever else is needed to bind them together, then coincidentally, today I saw a post on Instagram of the same thing so I searched and found a few others.

My question is this. How does one go about preserving this?

Do I need to? I'm assuming yes, because in one post they say to wet the tip (this particular one was in stick form, not a wider puck) and "draw" all over your face with it.

It's appealing to me because then I don't need a container - most I've seen come in powder form, which needs a jar or a pack.. or mud (thick) form, which again needs a jar - and I don't need to mess with mixing, etc. and I figured there must be others like me who want to use em but are lazy to go mix lol

So how would you add preservative to what essentially is a clay/mud block? Any thoughts?
 

MelissaG

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I'm not sure how that will work. I made a mud mask for myself the other night and it was... well it was mud. Bentonite clay with equal amounts of apple cider vinegar and a bit of aloe vera juice. My skin felt wonderful.

If you make it into a puck, wouldn't that mean that the customer then has to add water to it to get it to work? Seems more like it would work better in a container. I had some people here suggest adding the dry to it's own container, then the wet to a separate container. The customers can put a bit into their hand and mix it then spread it on their face. It would save it from alot of water exposure.

I'm not sure though, how do the big companies do it? Might try looking at Sephora for mud masks and start following some links to see what's included. It might give you an idea where to start.
 
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I want to make some new stuff for the new year. I sell soap, lotion bars and balms currently.

I've been thinking of pucks of clay for some months now.. with EOs (maybe, but need to research more) and whatever else is needed to bind them together, then coincidentally, today I saw a post on Instagram of the same thing so I searched and found a few others.

My question is this. How does one go about preserving this?

Do I need to? I'm assuming yes, because in one post they say to wet the tip (this particular one was in stick form, not a wider puck) and "draw" all over your face with it.

It's appealing to me because then I don't need a container - most I've seen come in powder form, which needs a jar or a pack.. or mud (thick) form, which again needs a jar - and I don't need to mess with mixing, etc. and I figured there must be others like me who want to use em but are lazy to go mix lol

So how would you add preservative to what essentially is a clay/mud block? Any thoughts?

This might be helpful.


I did make this recipe but I haven't tried it yet. She also has a recipe using pink clay.
 

Dawni

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This might be helpful.


I did make this recipe but I haven't tried it yet. She also has a recipe using pink clay.
Oh yeah I've seen these before. I read there that there's no sure fire way of preserving clay. Something about the particles? So I guess they're more for personal use. I will have a look again in cased I missed something. Thank you.
 
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Oh yeah I've seen these before. I read there that there's no sure fire way of preserving clay. Something about the particles? So I guess they're more for personal use. I will have a look again in cased I missed something. Thank you.
Keep in mind that they'd only be wet while in use, then drying out completely again. They'd be open to the air and not in a container that would keep moisture in. I'm not sure how much of an issue it would be.
 

Dawni

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I'm not sure how much of an issue it would be.
Neither am I actually, hence the question.
I've been given the impression that anything that comes in contact with water (except soap lol) needs a preservative but this made me wonder since essentially it's not even water based.

So do you think, if I were to come up with a formula, and sell these solid clay masks, that I might not need a preservative?
 

TheGecko

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I've been given the impression that anything that comes in contact with water (except soap lol) needs a preservative but this made me wonder since essentially it's not even water based.

It wouldn't need a preservative because what water does soak into the clay bar is removed once it is dried out again. The problem would be customers who don't follow all of the directions...who use the bar, but then then put it back in the tin while it's still wet.
 
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I think you are better offer packaging the dry ingredients, with instructions how to mix up small batches for immediate use. You can even offer several "recipes" - one with water, one with aloe vera gel, another with milk, etc. These mixes are easy to make and package, and usually have good markup.
 

Dawni

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I think you are better offer packaging the dry ingredients, with instructions how to mix up small batches for immediate use. You can even offer several "recipes" - one with water, one with aloe vera gel, another with milk, etc. These mixes are easy to make and package, and usually have good markup.
This is probably the best way to go, and is what literally EVERYONE is doing lol I was thinking if it was possible I'd wanna do something different.

It's still an option though, if all else fails haha
 
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Sometimes there is a reason everyone is doing it one way. ;) 😁

EDIT: Here are some of Marie's responses to her reader's questions about the need for a preservative in the clay bar:

Assuming you let the bar dry thoroughly between uses it’ll last ages—the original I made for this post is still going strong. Even though there is aloe juice in it, like dried pasta, the water portion doesn’t stick around for long. I do live somewhere very dry, though, so it dried quickly when I made it and dries quickly after each use. If you live somewhere more humid, you should probably consider adding a preservative.

...
That really depends on how humid it is where you live, but if it takes more than a day or two to dry I’d worry about spoilage. Clay is highly prone to moulding, and a large part of the success of this bar is ensuring it is dry 99% of the time. People who live in really humid environments have reported issues with mould, so keep an eye out and place it somewhere with plenty of air flow!


...clay is a very hard thing to preserve. From Making Skincare: “Your preservative system will be compromised if there are solid particles, for example, talc, inorganic sunscreens, clays, pigments as the preservative may absorb onto the surface of the particles and so become unavailable to protect the water phase.” There’s a reason there’s no newer clay bar recipes on my website—I’m unsure I can create anything shelf stable with much of anything other than straight clay, and even with straight clay the quick drying time is really necessary, hence my hesitation to explore further in this area.
 
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MelissaG

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Sometimes there is a reason everyone is doing it one way. ;) 😁

EDIT: Here are some of Marie's responses to her reader's questions about the need for a preservative in the clay bar:

Assuming you let the bar dry thoroughly between uses it’ll last ages—the original I made for this post is still going strong. Even though there is aloe juice in it, like dried pasta, the water portion doesn’t stick around for long. I do live somewhere very dry, though, so it dried quickly when I made it and dries quickly after each use. If you live somewhere more humid, you should probably consider adding a preservative.

...
That really depends on how humid it is where you live, but if it takes more than a day or two to dry I’d worry about spoilage. Clay is highly prone to moulding, and a large part of the success of this bar is ensuring it is dry 99% of the time. People who live in really humid environments have reported issues with mould, so keep an eye out and place it somewhere with plenty of air flow!


...clay is a very hard thing to preserve. From Making Skincare: “Your preservative system will be compromised if there are solid particles, for example, talc, inorganic sunscreens, clays, pigments as the preservative may absorb onto the surface of the particles and so become unavailable to protect the water phase.” There’s a reason there’s no newer clay bar recipes on my website—I’m unsure I can create anything shelf stable with much of anything other than straight clay, and even with straight clay the quick drying time is really necessary, hence my hesitation to explore further in this area.
It's why I thought of keeping it in dry form, and then adding it to your hand and mixing it in your palm. It just seems safer. Mix as you use it. I've decided against adding it to my products because it just seems like there would be problems.
 

Dawni

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Sometimes there is a reason everyone is doing it one way. ;) 😁
Oh definitely haha

I did read those same things and I already know she's pointing at me when she cautions those who live in really humid climates lol

Thank you for those who responded. It might seem I'm trying to be stubborn about this but I have something in mind that I wanted to do, and I'd rather not do it than do it half a**ed yknow? Not saying sticking dry clays in a pack is lazy LOL but it's just not what I had in mind, and like I said there are already so many choices here for those.

I just wanted to see if there was another option, and it's looking like there isn't. But having said that, I might try to make a small puck and wet the thing and see how long it takes to dry, how long til it gets moldy, etc. so at least I, and anyone else who wants to try, has first hand info about it.

Someone mentioned checking what the big companies do, I found this:
IMG_20211219_182613.jpg
 
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Someone mentioned checking what the big companies do, I found this:
View attachment 63269
@Dawni you might want to check out this DIY Bath & Body recipe:


She also had one for a foaming facial cleanser/mask but it's been taken down for updating.
 
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@Dawni you might want to check out this DIY Bath & Body recipe:


She also had one for a foaming facial cleanser/mask but it's been taken down for updating.
I have her recipe for the foaming facial cleanser/mask and it is wonderful! I hope she posts the update soon.
 
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