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Cat&Oak

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This is a carry on from another thread.

I've seen a few people who have claimed that some soapmakers on Youtube give bad and misleading information. No names please.

What kind of information have you found to be bad or misleading that would be helpful for new people?
 

earlene

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Visibly not wearing protective gear while making their videos. (Some do explain why & caution that the new soapmaker SHOULD wear PPE, but it's still a bad visual example to set.)

Using glass vessels to mix lye solution.

Using glass vessels to mix the soap batter.

Having small children nearby, in some cases I have seen the small child walk in and out of the soaping area. (scares the bejesus out of me when I see this.)

Having pets walk by the soaping area (Also scares the bejesus out of me when I see this.)

Handling soap bare-handed when taking it out of the mold while still less than 24 hours old.

Not using a scale to weigh ingredients.

Those are just off the top of my head. There have been many many other examples over the years.
 

Cat&Oak

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So in my own videos my cats will occasionally walk by my filming station. I know they won't try to jump on the table because I know my cats.

I also handle my soap bare handed when I cut it 24 hours later with no ill effects whatsoever.

Sometimes I don't wear sleeves either.

So I am one of the bad examples and I own my S#@$ and I'm not sorry about it.

People are quick to criticize especially soapmakers with other soapers. That's the risk when you put yourself out there for all to see.
 

earlene

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My cat wouldn't jump up onto the soap table with me working at it either, but I have been known to accidentally splatter raw soap on the floor and on the throw rug upon which I stand and onto my own feet. My cat often rubs up against my legs and obviously walks on the floor, so I don't want her near my soapmaking. Accidents happen and although I can quickly clean up my own self, I don't want to have to handle a lye burn on a cat!

In fact, the last time I splattered soap onto the floor, I stopped soaping long enough to cover a spot on the throw rug with a towel & wiped the floor with vinegar to prevent the possibility that Kitty Baby might later wake up and come get raw soap on her little toe beans. I think I also had to wash my feet, which has only happened maybe 4 times in as many years, but I am well prepared for that. Immediately after molding the soap, the throw rug & towel went into the washing machine to ensure no bare toe beans or people feet would come in contact (Hubby also walks around barefoot.) There are no doors to keep Kitty Baby out of my kitchen, so I don't soap while she is awake, but there is no guarantee she won't wake up, so I am pretty cognizant of possible spills and splatters. Usually I prefer her to be outdoors or on the Catio (which does have a door I can close.)

True, I rarely wear sleeves and neither do I wear closed-toed shoes (just not my thing, even in winter, I only wear zorries in the house, maybe with socks if I'm cold enough), and I see that I do show my bare forearms in at least one soapmaking video, but not my almost bare feet.

I agree that some soaps are more fully saponified before the 24 hour mark than others, but that is not always the case, and some soaps are ready to cut in as little as 8 hours, so I would not trust that saponification is complete that early. Personally, I do believe wearing gloves when handling soap while unmolding and for at least the first 48 to 72 hours is prudent. But then, I also use a very low SuperFat, so perhaps it is relative.

I don't think the intent here for this thread is to be overly critical of other soapmakers, but to draw attention to the fact that it's not only the experienced soapmaker watching these videos, but the novice who may not realize that some of the practices we may feel safe for our own selves, is not what we preach to the newcomer.
 

Cat&Oak

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My cat wouldn't jump up onto the soap table with me working at it either, but I have been known to accidentally splatter raw soap on the floor and on the throw rug upon which I stand and onto my own feet. My cat often rubs up against my legs and obviously walks on the floor, so I don't want her near my soapmaking. Accidents happen and although I can quickly clean up my own self, I don't want to have to handle a lye burn on a cat!

In fact, the last time I splattered soap onto the floor, I stopped soaping long enough to cover a spot on the throw rug with a towel & wiped the floor with vinegar to prevent the possibility that Kitty Baby might later wake up and come get raw soap on her little toe beans. I think I also had to wash my feet, which has only happened maybe 4 times in as many years, but I am well prepared for that. Immediately after molding the soap, the throw rug & towel went into the washing machine to ensure no bare toe beans or people feet would come in contact (Hubby also walks around barefoot.) There are no doors to keep Kitty Baby out of my kitchen, so I don't soap while she is awake, but there is no guarantee she won't wake up, so I am pretty cognizant of possible spills and splatters. Usually I prefer her to be outdoors or on the Catio (which does have a door I can close.)

True, I rarely wear sleeves and neither do I wear closed-toed shoes (just not my thing, even in winter, I only wear zorries in the house, maybe with socks if I'm cold enough), and I see that I do show my bare forearms in at least one soapmaking video, but not my almost bare feet.

I agree that some soaps are more fully saponified before the 24 hour mark than others, but that is not always the case, and some soaps are ready to cut in as little as 8 hours, so I would not trust that saponification is complete that early. Personally, I do believe wearing gloves when handling soap while unmolding and for at least the first 48 to 72 hours is prudent. But then, I also use a very low SuperFat, so perhaps it is relative.

I don't think the intent here for this thread is to be overly critical of other soapmakers, but to draw attention to the fact that it's not only the experienced soapmaker watching these videos, but the novice who may not realize that some of the practices we may feel safe for our own selves, is not what we preach to the newcomer.
Well said! 😍 You are always full of great knowledge so I thank you for that.

I admit to being overly defensive and protective of my YouTube brothers and sisters. It is an incredible amount of work to make them and I'm sure they just want to do the best they can just like I do. I doubt my channel will ever be popular I mostly do it because I love the creative aspect. You make great points to think about ❤
 

TheGecko

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Using glass for lye and mixing soap. I finally quit watching BrambleBerry videos because I got a ton of crap from them for asking them (politely) to not use glass for either, that it was dangerous and hypocritical to tell folks to 'suit up for safety' and then use glass.

Folks who claim that CP or HP soap is ready to use once it saponifies. While technically it is true, it's not good soap, it still needs to cure a minimum of four weeks (six is better).

Those are my biggest pet peeves.
 

lenarenee

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I've seen all of the above on YT, plus others like not sprinkling lye into water and they don't really bother me EXCEPT when these people do it as a lesson/tutorial. I believe if you're going to teach it, include all of the exacting safety rules. The student will do whatever they want later, but a teacher is responsible for including all safety info.

I'm about to teach someone cold process, and needed to review the basic lye safety rules because I break them (I mix lye solution without a mask, just physically avoid the steam/fumes, I don't wear long sleeves because I think it's easier to rinse batter off skin than. have to remove an article of clothing). She'll learn them - and them make her own choices later.
 
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TheGecko

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they don't really bother me EXCEPT when these people do it as a lesson/tutorial.
The only problem with this is that a lot of folks don't distinguish between "I'm sharing my soap making process" to "I'm going to teach you how to make soap."

I don't wear gloves or long sleeves or long pants or even shoes. I do wear safety glasses when master batching my lye, but quit when making soap after I got larger lenses for my regular glasses. I also don't wear a hair net or cap and I have long hair, but I make sure I brush it real well, secure in a bun and run a lint roller over myself before going to the kitchen. But I don't make videos.

IMHO once you start making videos, especially as a way to promote your business, you have a responsibility to use best manufacturing and safety practices.
 

lenarenee

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The only problem with this is that a lot of folks don't distinguish between "I'm sharing my soap making process" to "I'm going to teach you how to make soap."

I don't wear gloves or long sleeves or long pants or even shoes. I do wear safety glasses when master batching my lye, but quit when making soap after I got larger lenses for my regular glasses. I also don't wear a hair net or cap and I have long hair, but I make sure I brush it real well, secure in a bun and run a lint roller over myself before going to the kitchen. But I don't make videos.

IMHO once you start making videos, especially as a way to promote your business, you have a responsibility to use best manufacturing and safety practices.
A lot don't. But when they do, they've officially taken on the roll of instructor and have a responsibility to do it right. Other than that, it's user (viewer) beware.

You don't wear shoes?!! I go barefoot in the house except for soaping. My fear was stepping into a blob of batter and then figuring out how to hobble to the shower without slipping or sliding!
 

Justcallmewillie

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I hope this isn't too off topic, but as a new soaper that is was using glass to mix lye solution, what should you use instead?
What’s wrong with glass? I use Pyrex all the time. If it will take boiling water to cold water without breaking, I’d say it’s fine. I’ve also used enamelware and that works well. Just avoid aluminum at all costs 🤣
 

Tara_H

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I hope this isn't too off topic, but as a new soaper that is was using glass to mix lye solution, what should you use instead?
When I was getting started I read on this forum that you should use plastic marked with a 2 or a 5 in the recycle code - PP and HDPE although I can never remember which is which. I've stick with that advice and it's worked well so far, not to mention that HDPE jugs and containers of various kinds are cheap, easy to find, and often come in convenient stackable formats.
 

TheGecko

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You don't wear shoes?!! I go barefoot in the house except for soaping. My fear was stepping into a blob of batter and then figuring out how to hobble to the shower without slipping or sliding!
I have several damp and dry microfiber towels on my cart when I soap and my sink is a turn and step away. I clean up between each batch.
 

CreativeWeirdo

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I hope this isn't too off topic, but as a new soaper that is was using glass to mix lye solution, what should you use instead?
Stainless Steel
Polypropylene (PP): Type of plastic with a plastic recycling number of "2"
High Density Poly Ethelene (HDPE): Type of plastic with a plastic recycling number of "5"

This was what was taught to me on the lye safety video for my online CP soap making course I just finished. Has anyone else heard this or something similar?
 

Cat&Oak

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I wear shorts when I soap during the summer 😳

No Pyrex. No glass. I only use polypropylene for mixing lye solution and batter.

The only YouTube soaper I absolutely cannot tolerate is a lady who does HP and sells her soaps with medical claims. Makes me so irritated that people are willfully stupid when it comes to FDA labeling.
 

Zing

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I've mentioned this before but I was floored to see this one guy's video. He was dressed in a t-shirt and shorts throughout his soaping session. He repeatedly emphasized the importance of wearing safety goggles and gloves -- while he was barefaced and barehanded the entire time! :eek: Dude!
 

Mistrael

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I hope this isn't too off topic, but as a new soaper that is was using glass to mix lye solution, what should you use instead?
I found some adorable little stainless steel milk frothing pitchers on Amazon and Webstaurant supply store. I lack the patience to froth milk when I'm not getting paid for it, but they're perfect lye mixing containers. I'm loving the handles and pour spouts, it seems like they reduce the risk of accidents.
 
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