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Soaping From Room Temperature

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Does anyone have experience with soaping from room temperature? Mainly meaning, using lye water that is at an ambient temperature and not warm/hot?

If so, what was your process like? Can you melt the oils, mix the cool lye water, then soap from there or are there issues that would present?

Thanks!
 

Cactuslily

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I usually soap at room temp. While lye water is cooling, I add my hard butters together, melt them, then add liquid oils, which bring down temp of heated hard butters.
 
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45parallelsoapco

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I am not sure what the temperature of the lye water is - i don't think it matters (?)
I melt my hard oils with the lye water - i measure my hard oils into one container. liquid oils into another. I mix my water and lye and once it is dissolved, I add it to the hard oils. It melts it in a few minutes, then I add my liquid oils. SB, just a bit, then add my fragrance or EO. SB again, usually til medium trace, then pour into my mold.

I also do not let my soaps gel. I stick them in the fridge and pop them out the next day. The only time they stay in longer then one day is if i use my 7% SF recipe. That is when i use the lye water that has been in the fridge all night cooling down.

If you ever decide to make whipped bar soap, i will tell you my method for that too!:)
 

Gerry

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The only issue I can think of is if your lye is much cooler than the temperature at which your oil needs to be to stay clear. The lye water could cause the harder oil/wax to solidify and lead to a weird or false trace. This would be especially true if you're using beeswax or something like that in your oils.
 

shunt2011

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The only issue I can think of is if your lye is much cooler than the temperature at which your oil needs to be to stay clear. The lye water could cause the harder oil/wax to solidify and lead to a weird or false trace. This would be especially true if you're using beeswax or something like that in your oils.
I have never had an issue with it ever. I've used beeswax, cocoa butter, mango butter, high CO and never false trace. I just make sure my hard oils/ butter are melted clear. Of course you need to know your own personal recipe inside and out.
 

Gerry

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I have never had an issue with it ever. I've used beeswax, cocoa butter, mango butter, high CO and never false trace. I just make sure my hard oils/ butter are melted clear. Of course you need to know your own personal recipe inside and out.
I'm sure it depends on the initial temperature of your oils as well. I've always soaped "on the edge" when I need lots of working time, like 2 degrees cooler and my oil would be cloudy before putting in the lye. Adding lye water 10 degrees cooler than that temperature may not be a great idea (at least that's my theory! Hahaha!).
 
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Very cool to hear. I masterbatch my oils (I have a set oil recipe for 95% of my soaps), but had not thought of doing the same with lye. Thanks!!
 

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I've been soaping at RT for years now. I masterbatch my lye generally. If not I make it the night before. Then I just melt my hard oils/butters, add my liquid and off I go a soaping. I measure out 10-12 batches at a time.
I have never had an issue with it ever. I've used beeswax, cocoa butter, mango butter, high CO and never false trace. I just make sure my hard oils/ butter are melted clear. Of course you need to know your own personal recipe inside and out.
I do exactly the same as above. It is still going to heat up when you mix your oil and lye together
 

Dahila

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3 years ago someone said about RT here, and from that day I go down to 33 pr 34 celsius if I can get away with that lows, Usually I do. Lot's of time to do swirls and designs ;)
 

Gerry

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3 years ago someone said about RT here, and from that day I go down to 33 pr 34 celsius if I can get away with that lows, Usually I do. Lot's of time to do swirls and designs ;)
33 to 34 Celsius, even in winter? For a Canadian you keep a pretty warm house! :mrgreen:

I often soap as low as 26°C, but the hardest oils I use these days are CO and lard.
 

Dahila

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33 to 34 Celsius, even in winter? For a Canadian you keep a pretty warm house! :mrgreen:

I often soap as low as 26°C, but the hardest oils I use these days are CO and lard.
RT is not exactly Room temperature, it is the lowest temp that your coconut will not harden. 33 i think is the lowest for me. I warm them up 5 min in microwave, then go upstairs to have two cups of coffee when I come downstairs mix lye it goes to cold water , but lye cools very fast , In mean time I just prepare all my additives. I have 20 at day and night goes down to 17 :lolno:
Garry really 26? Coconut will stay liquid at this but lard? give me the temp for lard so maybe I could have another cuppa
 
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Gerry

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RT is not exactly Room temperature, it is the lowest temp that your coconut will not harden. 33 i think is the lowest for me. I warm them up 5 min in microwave, then go upstairs to have two cups of coffee when I come downstairs mix lye it goes to cold water , but lye cools very fast , In mean time I just prepare all my additives. I have 20 at day and night goes down to 17 :lolno:
Garry really 26? Coconut will stay liquid at this but lard? give me the temp for lard so maybe I could have another cuppa
I have some lard that I rendered that's liquid at 20! But the lard I'm buying seems to stay clear at 26 as long as it's mixed in well with the bulk of my lighter oils while it's nice and warm. But I know I'm right on the edge because I've forgotten it and have had it cloud up on me more than once when it got a little cooler than this.

It's very interesting how you keep track of time and oil temperature by the number of cups of coffee you've had. It takes a lot of soaping experience I would think to do that... a lot of coffee drinking experience too! :)

I keep my house at 23°C. My excuse is that if I keep it much cooler my CO is harder to get out of the pail! Hahaha
 

mx6inpenn

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I melt all my hard oils together until barely clear then add liquid oils. My lye is masterbatched and kept on a shelf in my unheated garage in NW PA. I bring it in first, then gather the rest of my supplies, mix colors, line mold, melt and mix oils. The temp in my house is typically 70 in the winter. The lye solution is still pretty cool when it's added the the oils. The reaction with the oils begins almost instantly and it warms up quickly. I've never gotten false trace either.
 

TeresaT

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I soap at room temp (which depends on the weather). In the winter it's harder to do since the hard oils have all solidified. In the summer my lard is nearly liquid since I don't have central air conditioning and it's hot in Tennessee. My lye solution is a 50% master batch that I add my extra liquid to. That causes it to warm up a bit. I heat the hard oils up until half of it is melted then I let the residual heat melt the rest of them (stirring helps) before adding the soft oils. I quit checking the temperature of either the oils or the lye solution about a year ago. If the containers are comfortable to touch, then they're the right temperature to combine to make soap. So far that has worked well for me. I haven't had any volcanoes or separation (except for the one time I made a 5# batch using honey and goat milk. I had never made a large batch like that before and it overheated and separated. I don't think I SBd long enough, though.)
 

Gerry

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The lye solution is still pretty cool when it's added the the oils. The reaction with the oils begins almost instantly and it warms up quickly. I've never gotten false trace either.
My reaction never goes quickly when I soap at near true RT, but I think that's the point because I want it to go slow. Perhaps it depends on the mix of oils used. :)
 
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Gerry

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Lard will slow the trace, :)
So will OO. But I know you already know that! But here's the real test... now how many coffees worth is the difference between a 10% OO and 60% OO recipe trace time when soaped at 32 degrees Celsius with the balance in CO? *kidding*

The scary thing is that you probably really know this! :mrgreen:
 
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