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gill

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Hello fellow soapers, I would appreciate any advice as to what I can do with bucket loads of soap scrapes. I have done some re batching before, in which I melted the cp soap scrapes ,then went ahead and made some Lemon sponge soap cake . Turned out rather nice and smelt yummy, but I was wondering what other soapers might be doing with their cp soap scraps. Thank in advance.
 

Yooper

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I save them, then melt them down with a little water to make a few new bars. I do it in the crockpot, then when full melted, I add some coconut milk and essential oil, and put them in a mold. Some of my favorites have been done this way!
 

boyago

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Rebatch for new soaps, when I did this it kind of sucked cause the new bars were really really good and there was no way to re-create them. You could salt them out for straight soap to be used for laundry/dish soap. Chop up the color full ones for confetti soaps. Melt them down into a giant block and start your soap sculpture movement... I love scrap projects they are cheap fun!
 

gill

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Many thanks for you quick response. It's always interesting finding out what other soapers are doing out there. I'm a newbie to this forum, and so far just love it. :)) hope you are all having fun making your soaps as much as I do. :)
 

MorpheusPA

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Scraps can be ground for laundry soap (while low superfat soap is best for that, even 5% works just fine). Combine with equal weight of washing soda and equal weight of 20 Mule Team Borax and the stuff works great! I use Purex for scent (yes, they still make it!) as I don't want to add oils to laundry soap. Mix it all together and drop it in a plastic container, and use 1 to 2 tablespoons per load.

I like the confetti soap idea! Just keep in mind that if you label, getting that ingredient list right will be tough!

This last idea is rather oddball, but it works for me. Powdered or very tiny shards can be spread on your garden or lawn at a rate of 1 handful per hundred square feet or so. It helps with water penetration and softens soils over time (when I do this formally, I use a solution of sodium lauryl sulfate, but hey...free soap scraps, and they work just as well).
 

MorpheusPA

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Ah yes, I have something like that too. I get some interesting scent combos when I take my shower. :D
Been there, done that, half gagged on the apple-orange-lemon-lime-cherry-plumeria-violet-peppermint-rain forest-dragon's blood scent.

It's probably wiser to have a few bags and put self-similar scents in each. :razz:
 

Seawolfe

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This last idea is rather oddball, but it works for me. Powdered or very tiny shards can be spread on your garden or lawn at a rate of 1 handful per hundred square feet or so. It helps with water penetration and softens soils over time (when I do this formally, I use a solution of sodium lauryl sulfate, but hey...free soap scraps, and they work just as well).
This is incredibly clever! Thanks! I guess some dissolved in water would be good for leaf sprays for some plant ailments? (aphids? I cant remember).

I like soap scraps as embeds in new soap. Most of my recipes are pretty similar so ingredient listing wouldn't be a huge deal, I don't sell though.

I've also made sugar scrubs with scraps seperated by color and scent family - that worked out well.
 

MorpheusPA

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This is incredibly clever! Thanks! I guess some dissolved in water would be good for leaf sprays for some plant ailments? (aphids? I cant remember).
OK, Off Topic (sort of) alert.

Soap solutions are fatal to aphids and most other soft-bodied insects (but harmless to worms and bees and beetles, including the ladybugs that will hunt down the last of your aphids for you). Add about half the weight of soap in common cooking oil to improve the kill rate (shake well and keep shaking during application).

Most fungal infections dislike soap due to the high pH and sodium ions kicking around. Powdery mildew, in particular, can be treated with simple soap (although I tend to use baking soda plus soap as it works better, at a rate of 1 Tbsp baking soda, 1 tsp soap per gallon of water).

Almost every sprayed chemical in the garden can benefit from extra surfactant, but soap is not recommended. Use a non-ionic surfactant made for the purpose in this case, like any good spreader sticker on the market.

Soap added to your Miracle Gro feeder or fertigation system (if you have one) enhances the leaf penetration of the feeding, and also treats the soil at the same time.

Soap sprayed on spots in the lawn or garden that tend to stay dry even in wet weather will help slowly break up the natural grease and waxes that bacteria produce. Soils that are hydrophobic due to excessive dryness can also be dampened this way, and small amounts of soap are harmless to slightly helpful to the plant. Two to four ounces per thousand square feet, monthly, is not excessive but it doesn't need to be done that often by any stretch.
 

not_ally

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On topic and VERY geeky! In the geek stakes (in which I am a proud contender), you are a good one, Morph :) I always check your posts b/c of the kinship.
 
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rubalicious

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Skayc1 I love your soap balls and bars they are lovely. How old is your soap when you do the balls?
 
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