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Soap Queen Technique when using Accelerating FO

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SoapSap

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I read this response from the Soap Queen to someone commenting on an accelerating FO. She said to mix equal parts of the offending FO into carrier oil from the formula that was heated to 200 degrees. This will cause an initial acceleration of that oil and as a result will tame the acceleration when it is mixed into all the batter at trace.

Does anyone practice this technique? Is it effective?
 

KristaY

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200 degrees? Wow. I wonder what's the significance of that particular temp. Are you supposed to cool it down or add it at 200 degrees to your much cooler soap batter? I'll also be interested to hear if anyone has tried this. Thanks for sharing SoapSap!
 

SoapSap

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200 degrees? Wow. I wonder what's the significance of that particular temp. Are you supposed to cool it down or add it at 200 degrees to your much cooler soap batter? I'll also be interested to hear if anyone has tried this. Thanks for sharing SoapSap!

Am so sorry. I misquoted the temperature in my post. I thought when you mentioned it, it was rather high too. It is 100 degrees, not 200 degrees.

This is a cut and paste of the part of the SQ statement I read:
Reply from Bramble Berry
......... Take equal parts liquid oil out of your recipe and heat it up to 100 degrees. Then, add your fragrance into this oil. This simply dilutes the fragrance oil’s initial acceleration........You can also add the oil/fragrance mixture earlier than usual. Rather than adding the fragrance at a thick trace, you can add it at the first sign of thin trace ...........
 

KristaY

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That makes more sense, lol! I've added misbehaving FO's to the oils before lye and it usually helps a bit but not a lot. I did it a couple of weeks ago and got soap on a stick in about 15 seconds after adding lye. I remade the batch and added the FO after I got just to emulsion, then stirred the FO in with a whisk. That batch turned out beautifully. If I know I'm going to have acceleration with an FO but want some kind of design (like with a floral) I definitely don't add to oils before lye. On my next batch, which will be a water scent, I'm going to try to blend the FO with a bit of warmed OO from the batch and see if it helps at all.
 

MorpheusPA

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I add most accelerating florals to a portion of the base oil at whatever temperature I'm soaping, then add at lightest trace.

It helps. You still have to mix fast and pour, but it's not quite as bad as adding the FO alone at trace. Do any complex coloring before adding the FO and plan on not doing anything that takes a lot of time to create in the mold.

I've also tried FO in the base oils before lye and that also helps, but as KristaY noted, not a great deal. I tend to end up with a quickly-tracing mix that has to be worked with very, very quickly.
 

IrishLass

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Right here, silly!
I haven't used SoapQueen's particular method, but like Krista and Morpheus, I've added ornery FOs to the bulk of the warmed base oils in my pot before adding the lye (my oil temps are between 110F/43C and 120F /49C). Sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn't. Some FOs just won't cooperate unless subjugated with HP. lol


IrishLass :)
 

Dahila

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Am so sorry. I misquoted the temperature in my post. I thought when you mentioned it, it was rather high too. It is 100 degrees, not 200 degrees.

This is a cut and paste of the part of the SQ statement I read:
Reply from Bramble Berry
......... Take equal parts liquid oil out of your recipe and heat it up to 100 degrees. Then, add your fragrance into this oil. This simply dilutes the fragrance oil’s initial acceleration........You can also add the oil/fragrance mixture earlier than usual. Rather than adding the fragrance at a thick trace, you can add it at the first sign of thin trace ...........
I had not read the blog but I do it with EO and FO , it is a common sense, you do not add fo undiluted or cold, must be warm :))
 

skayc1

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She told me that, on a comment I asked about for Island Escape FO,
also suggested soaping at 110-115 temp.

"Terah from Bramble Berry replies...
Hi Sharon! I'm so glad our Island Escape Fragrance Oil has become your new favorite fragrance! This scent can cause minor acceleration. To help slow this down, take 1 oz. (basically equal amounts of fragrance oil to fixed oil) liquid oil out of your recipe and heat it up to 100 degrees. Then, add your fragrance into this oil. This simply dilutes the fragrance oil’s initial acceleration. You can also add the oil/fragrance mixture earlier than usual. Rather than adding the fragrance at a thick trace, you can add it at the first sign of thin trace. Always hand stir the fragrance/oil mixture in with a fork/ladle and never, ever use a hand blender for problem oils. Lastly, raise your temperatures to about 110 to 115 degrees. This will help to keep your mixture more liquid than at a lower temperature. If it does start to rice you can try using your stick blender to help smooth the soap out as seen in the Soap Behaving Badly blog post.The Vanilla Color Stabilizer only works marginally well in CP soap for 4 to 9 months before the fragrance eventually goes brown. I will email you personally to discuss this further!"
 

hmlove1218

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She told me that, on a comment I asked about for Island Escape FO,
also suggested soaping at 110-115 temp.
Off topic: I fell in love with that fragrance when I got a sample of it in my last order. I have decided I have to get a bottle lol. How does it soap and how bad is the acceleration?
 

skayc1

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I mixed it with another fragrance, & had alot of solid oils so I don't think it was extremely bad acceleration. This is the soap it made- Today I tried this tip of mixing the oil into a fragrance & I think it made my oils leak after I poured the batter in the mold.
 
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