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Soap on a rope...what rope?

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nsmar4211

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I'd like to make some soap on a rope for a surprise for my dad. I have a CP batch curing where I used 100% cotton crochet yarn imbedded as an experiement, but I'm looking for something less stretchy and time consuming (I crocheted a chain to make it thicker). I'd prefer to use something that I can thread through a hole and then somehow tie/fasten together since the imbedding was a pain.

Has anyone experiemented with this? Clothesline rope looks like it won't dry fast enough and could create wear issues with the surrounding soap staying wet (in the hole area). I was considering paracord and thinking to just knot it to fasten, but it's kind of thin and I'm not sure how friendly to tender skin it would be. Twisted nylon also looks like it'll lack the comfort factor. I've seen nice soft ropes on store bought soap ropes but I haven't paid enough attention to what they were!
 

kumudini

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I think it's better to soap and mold as usual and then carve a hole in to the dry soap and thread it onto a rope of your choice.
 

notapantsday

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"Technical" ropes like paracord are usually more on the rough side, because the friction allows for better knots. Naturally smooth materials like Dyneema/Spectra are often even covered with polyester or nylon so the knots don't slip when under load.

I would look for decorative ropes. I have a piece of rope that was included in some kind of bracelet making set and it's incredibly smooth and feels really nice on the skin. If you have a shop nearby that sells things like that, stop by.

Polyester or Nylon can be really soft if the fibers are fine enough (microfiber). Polypropylene is cheap but doesn't feel as nice. Cotton will absorb a lot of water, I'm not sure if you want that. Nylon also absorbs a little bit of water but not nearly as much as cotton.

For a knot, there are about a dozen different knots you could use but personally, I think the double fisherman's bend looks nice. If you want a small, simple knot, I'd recommend a sheet bend. A nail knot may also be a good option.
 
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LoveOscar

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Maybe take a look at the nylon ropes used in sailing? You can get varied sizes, colors, patterns, and still be able to make your knots.
 

shunt2011

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I saw some nylon cording for sale at one of the suppliers for just that purpose. Maybe WSP. Can't remember for sure though.
 

Susie

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If you have a good fabric store-or a good hobby store, you can usually find several different types of cording. I would go for nylon.
 

Relle

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Try a haberdashery shop.
 

amd

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I think its called jute rope? My mom used to make soap pouches in a rope for my uncles when they were in the military and I think that is what the rope was called. She got it at the fabric store.
 

nsmar4211

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Notapants: Did not think about the beading section, will have to check there! Thank you for the knot links...I was just going to do a square knot but those look so much better!

LoveOscar: There's a west marine somewhere around here...great idea!

Obsidian...bath poufs? Hrmm Was considering picking up some stuff like that at dollar store and swiping the ropes, but there's got to be a less wasteful way...

shunt.... I had seen the premade ropes (brambleberry I think) but that was the imbed style :(

susie...I didn't see anything at JoAnne's that I liked. I will have to maybe check the upholstry place!

maya... no rotting issues? No keeping the soap wet around the cord issues? How thick of a cord?

relle...We don't have those here :). I had to look that up! I wish we had stores like that!

amd....the jute I have is either rough or too thin. And it smells funny when wet, I use it to macrame some small plant hangers. Not sure where I could get smooth thick stuff here..

Great ideas! Now I have an errand list!
 

lsg

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Bramble Berry has soap molds and rope for soap on a rope.
 

CTAnton

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Michael's has a section of para cord of different colors of a thickness I think would make for a good sized rope for soap...IMHO...nylon
 

nsmar4211

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lsg..... Brambleberry's are the embed type. I'm going for the "put through a hole and tie a knot" type :) I've looked at their mold a few times, but 4 at a time is so few.... :)
 

lsg

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lsg..... Brambleberry's are the embed type. I'm going for the "put through a hole and tie a knot" type :) I've looked at their mold a few times, but 4 at a time is so few.... :)
I understand. I find it easier to pour the soap around the rope than to try and put a hole through the soap. Just a suggestion.:p
 

Obsidian

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I would try something like this https://www.etsy.com/listing/203205568/16-braided-10mm-nylon-cord-for-jewelry?ref=related-7

Cotton stretches and can rot in wet conditions. I would worry that running the cord through a hole in the soap would make the soap wear away fast and fall off the rope. Embedding seems like it would stay in the soap better.

I've been meaning to make soap on a rope too but I will use a small log mold and rig something up so the cords are held in place. That way I can cut the bars and have the cord already in them.
 

DeeAnna

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Polypropylene rope is good for wet conditions because it doesn't absorb water, it floats, and it makes a hard, secure knot. The type usually used for boating is pretty harsh on the skin and rather hard. It sounds like there are softer types of polypro rope, however. Here's an example: http://www.knotandrope.com/Store/pc/viewPrd.asp?idproduct=720#.VhvEpCv64kI

Oh, and Cathy McGinnis (Soaping 101) did a soap on a rope video. She poured the soap into a slab mold and then pushed short sections of large diameter drinking straw in the places where she wanted holes. She just pushed the straw (and any soap inside the straw) out of each bar after unmolding the soap and cutting the bars.
 
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nsmar4211

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Ahhhh, I had looked at the poly ropes but thought they were scratchy-never occured to me to look for a softer version!

The "nylon" rope looks just like the soft poly...weird.

Now I need to figure out how thick of a rope to use (which determines the size of the holes I need LOL).

I saw the straw thing, was thinking it would work with aquarium tubing too if I want a bigger hole....:)

You guys rock!
 

galaxyMLP

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