"Soap Glitter" vs. Craft Glitter

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SmallThings

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I've always used glitter that is specifically marked as "for use in soap". But I wonder, is there truly a difference between "soap glitter" and regular old craft glitter? Or am I just being swindled out of a couple extra bucks?
 

pamielynn

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I've bought craft glitter and wouldn't use it because it felt very scratchy. Wouldn't want someone to get that in their eye. I don't know for sure, because I don't really use glitter, but I think "body-safe" glitter is ground much finer?
 

lsg

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Glitter for soap is safe to use on the skin, the other is not.
 

Tienne

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You can get cosmetic glitter that is made for eye makeup and body art and so on and that's hypoallergenic and safe to use on the skin. (I reckon, that if it's safe to use as eye makeup, then it's surely safe enough to use on soaps too.) It's not that expensive and a little goes a loooong way. Make sure you get the "ultra fine" or "super ultra fine" versions of it because the "fine" versions are a bit "chunky". They have lots of different colours on eBay. The holographic ones are gorgeous! If you search for "nail glitter", then often in the description, it will say it's safe for makeup and/or soaps, too. Just make sure to check that it IS safe for use on the skin.
 
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Tienne

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I'd like to modify my above comment somewhat, in that my opinion clearly is biased as to what MY personal preferences regarding glitter are. I prefer a shimmer, more than being able to see individual larger flakes of glitter clearly, but that is purely MY preference and may not be yours. I have seen soaps especially cupcake soaps that from what I can tell do have visibly larger glitter flakes on them and I have to say, they still look awesome! I just wanted to clarify that, so you don't think you can't or shouildn't use the "fine" versions. I just happen to think the more delicate, finer versions look more "classy" and subtle. (If glitter can at all be considered "classy", that is. LOL, but who cares? I think glitter is awesome.)

As a side note, I read somewhere, regarding soap, "That when all else fails, just add glitter" ... and that is as good advice as any! :lol: :lol:
 

peacefulheart

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Cosmetic Glitter

I do not recommend any cosmetic glitter for eye, lip or mucous membrane areas, there are cosmetic micas which I also co-op for on Facebook that are made especially for lip and eye products. :)
 

Lin

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^spam?

(the part I was referring to has since been deleted)
 
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Hazel

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As Tienne mentioned above, cosmetic glitter is much finer than craft glitter. I'm not an expert but I did some googling to find out cosmetic glitter is made of poly-coated skin safe pigments which measure .008 microns or smaller and are cut a specific way (oval, rounded or hexagonal). Cosmetic glitter softens on contact with moisture so (hopefully) it won't scratch. Craft glitter can be made from either plastic or metallic foil and is much larger. I looked at some craft glitter I have and the pieces look sort of square with sharp corners. Always make sure whatever glitter you have states it is cosmetic grade glitter or is made to be used on the skin. However, glitter is considered a color additive by the FDA and isn't approved for use in cosmetics.

Color Additives and Cosmetics

Composite pigments: Color additives used in combination to achieve variable effects, such as those found in pearlescent products, are subject to the same regulations as all other color additives. Some color additives, when used in combination, may form new pigments, which may not be approved for the intended use. An example is a "holographic" glitter, consisting of aluminum, an approved color additive, bonded to an etched plastic film.
So, if you see glitter advertised as FDA approved, you can be reasonably sure that either the advertiser doesn't know about FDA regulations or is misrepresenting the product. At this time, FDA enforcement of glitter not to be used in cosmetics is "discretionary" (whatever this means) and cosmetic manufacturers are still using glitter in their products. Who knows when and if this may change. Fortunately, soap isn't a cosmetic. ;)

Looked like it. Another admin deleted it.
 

MoonBath

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I've heard horror stories about craft glitter getting behind the eyeball and severing the optic nerve. :crazy: Scared the crap out of me.
 

SmallThings

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Oh my! Glad I asked :) I had a feel there was something to do with dissolvability and gentleness on skin. Soap glitter it is then.
 
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