safety glasses, goggles or face shield for over glasses?

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reflection

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those of you who were glasses, i wear reading glasses, which do you find works best? my reading glasses are fairly small and had bought safety glasses but am wondering if that is good enough eye protection after reading some recent threads here. any specific brands/models you like is particularly helpful. thanks in advance!
 

DeeAnna

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Safety glasses are primarily for protection against things flying at your eyes from the front or from the sides (if the glasses have side shields). For chemical splashes, you need goggles or a face shield to also protect your eyes and face against chemicals dripping down your head or spraying up from below. Glasses aren't designed for that kind of protection.

Many people use the "onion goggles" for soaping rather than a real chemical goggle. Onion goggles fit closely around the eye socket, so your eyes are at serious risk of being injured if there's a chemical splash and the goggles don't seal absolutely perfectly. While that might not be a big deal with onion fumes, I question whether this is wise when a person wants protection against chemicals such as sodium hydroxide. Chemical goggles cover more of the upper cheek, eyebrow, and temple area, giving more protection and security.

Chemical splash goggles: http://www.safetyglassesusa.com/splash-goggles.html
I use this one: http://www.safetyglassesusa.com/254-du-40097.html
and also this one with bifocal correction for reading: http://www.safetyglassesusa.com/bf61.html

Face shields: http://www.safetyglassesusa.com/face-shields.html
If I wanted a face shield, I'd seriously consider this one:http://www.safetyglassesusa.com/fs-16pc-af.html
This 3D shaped face shield will feel less bulky than the usual 2D curved face shield. It will also have less distortion when a person looks down.
You would want to pair it with this head gear: http://www.safetyglassesusa.com/hg-25.html
 
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Susie

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^^^What DeeAnna said!

If you are comfortable in goggles, buy those, they are cheap and readily available almost everywhere.

If you are not, then get a face shield. Trying to tell someone what they will prefer is rather difficult.
 

DeeAnna

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I should add if you're almost blind without your own prescription glasses, a face shield is probably going to work best. Some splash goggles are designed to be worn over glasses, but not all. The two I mention above are not glasses-friendly, for example.
 

reflection

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Thx. Yes, I do have to wear the glasses so am asking what others who also wear glasses find works best for them. I know some people find goggles fog up even if they are anti-fog. It sounds like the safety glasses aren't really enough though.
 

Guspuppy

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from the link that DeeAnna posted for the chemical splash goggles, I use the 'Crews 2230R' ones with my reading glasses. works great and has only fogged up once, when it was 85F and very humid in my house.
 

DeeAnna

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When I was a process engineer working in the chemical manufacturing industry, I had to wear safety glasses at all times except in the office area. When I was doing tests in the lab or working directly with chemicals out in the manufacturing area, I ~also~ had to wear a face shield or goggles. So, no, glasses aren't good enough when dealing with hazardous chemicals like NaOH. Wish glasses were enough -- it would be more pleasant!

Splash goggles with a double lens and anti fog coating are about as good as it gets for minimizing fogging. The Bolle goggles I use have a double lens design, and they fog up a lot less for me than my single lens Uvex bifocal goggles.

The ultimate, of course, would be to add a battery operated fan system to ventilate the goggles. These Haber goggles http://www.safetyglassesusa.com/hv-12096.html have a fan that turns on and off as the humidity varies inside the goggles. A plus is that they will also will fit over glasses. Pretty ritzy!
 

dibbles

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I could use those in the kitchen. My glasses always fog up when I open the oven and the heat is high.
 

reflection

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The ultimate, of course, would be to add a battery operated fan system to ventilate the goggles. These Haber goggles http://www.safetyglassesusa.com/hv-12096.html have a fan that turns on and off as the humidity varies inside the goggles. A plus is that they will also will fit over glasses. Pretty ritzy!
lol. all the safety equipment sure does make one look like a complete nerd/mad scientist/meth lab cook! right about when i get all my remaining equipment the weather is going to be the worst heatwise. it's been like a NY summer here with humidity.
 

Susie

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I find that I wear those goggles for such a short time that the fogging and such does not bother me. I just soap hot and fast and get them off faster.
 

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