Room temperature method?

Discussion in 'Beginners Soap Making Forum' started by Alison Bailey, Oct 27, 2018.

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  1. Oct 27, 2018 #1

    Alison Bailey

    Alison Bailey

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    I have just read about the 'room temperaturemethod' where you don't melt the hard oils. You just add the lye to the hard oils and it melts them. You then add the liquid oils, essential oils etc and proceed as normal. I tried it and loved it, but I wanted to ask the experts if there is any reason why this would not be a good idea. Here is a link to the site: http://www.soap-making-essentials.com/how-to-make-soap-roomtemp.html
     
  2. Oct 27, 2018 #2

    Relle

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    I understand your method you did to be - Thermal heat transfer.
    I do RTCP and the way I do it is melt the hard oils, add to the liquid oils, then add cooled lye, I've never had any issues doing it this way, I can't see any problems doing it your way as long as it is combined.
     
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  3. Oct 27, 2018 #3

    shunt2011

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    I do the same as Relle. As she explained what you’re talking about is thermal transfer. There are some here that do it. I masterbatch my lye so choose RTCP.
     
  4. Oct 28, 2018 #4

    BattleGnome

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    The drawback would be the type of hard oils you use and the amount. If you use a high % of a high melt oil you’ll run into issues with there being enough heat to melt everything (especially if you live in a colder climate).

    It’s a great energy saving method if you get annoyed with microwaves or double boilers
     
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  5. Jan 11, 2019 #5

    Chris_S

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    Relle just found this via search before i posted a new topic. I have a very quick question about this. What temo do you let you oils and butters get to with your lye water at rt? i use roughly 50/50 hard to soft oils and butters so would say 100F be ok for the oils when soaping at rt? Iv just do a fo test and both lye sol and oils were at rt because i only used a liquid oil as it was a test. Would really appreciate some assistance so i know what im planning wont turn out disastrous and ruin a good batch through poor knowledge thanks
     
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  6. Jan 11, 2019 #6

    shunt2011

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    Not Relle, But, I generally masterbatch my oils and lye. My oils, once measured out I place into my soaping bucket and put in the microwave just long enough for the majority to be melted and clear. I stir until everything is melted. I haven't taken temp in years but it's just warm to the touch before I add my lye mixture.

    If not using masterbatched oils I gently melt my hard oils (shea, coconut & lard or palm) in the microwave until almost completely melted, then stir to finish the little chunks. I then add my liquid oils (Olive, Rice bran, castor etc). The proceed to soap. Again, the outside of the bucket/container is just warm to the touch.
     
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  7. Jan 12, 2019 #7

    KiwiMoose

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    I would be worried that the hard oils wouldn't fully melt if using this method. How many people here have tried it?
     
  8. Jan 13, 2019 #8

    shunt2011

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    That’s the point. You warm just until everything is melted. It’s not hot though. I’ve been doing it for years. No problem. My problem arises when it’s a temperamental FO
     
  9. Jan 13, 2019 #9

    Chris_S

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    Thank you for answering my question shunt.

    I might be wrong but i have a feeling kiwi was reffering the heat transfer method or whatever its called that the op mentioned
     
  10. Jan 13, 2019 #10

    shunt2011

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    That may be. I’ve never tried the heat transfer as I use too many hard oils. No help there. Thank you!
     
  11. Jan 13, 2019 #11

    KiwiMoose

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    Ah - yes, I was wondering if anyone had tried the thermal transfer method, and whether it got hot enough to actually melt the hard oils. It would be a bit of a disaster if it didn't and you're standing there with a 'live' mixture full of bits of unmelted oils.
     
  12. Jan 13, 2019 #12

    MGM

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    I just read Marie at Humblebeeandme.com saying that she creamed the cold butters and liquid oils together (like making cookies!) before adding the hot lye for just this reason. That sounds like an extra step I'd be trying to avoid... I like the perceived simplicity of the original idea. And although I am now relatively comfortable manipulating cooled lye water, not sure how happy I'd be with it at scalding temperatures However to the original question, I do wonder if it makes an inferior product ; such a big deal is made of oils and lye being close in temperature.... Or not ... 120 F degrees apart, nbd....
     
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  13. Jan 13, 2019 #13

    BattleGnome

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    It depends on your recipe. I’ve used heat transfer successfully on 100% CO salt bars (mid winter) but haven’t tried it for any other recipe. If you use a ton of cocobutter or add any beeswax I wouldn’t reccomend this method, it simply wont get hot enough when you need it to.
     
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  14. Jan 14, 2019 #14

    Relle

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    What Shunt suggested to you is what I do. I don't masterbatch but just heat oils in the microwave, I haven't taken a temp since my first batch, so wouldn't have a clue what it would be.
     
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