Quantcast

Recommendations for wire soap cutter

SoapMakingForum

Help Support SoapMakingForum:

rparrny

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2015
Messages
512
Reaction score
325
Location
NY
Okay, so far I have been using my pastry knife to cut soaps and when I wasn't doing swirls it was just fine but now I find it can ruin some of my swirls when cut. I've been looking around and I see tons of wire cutters but most seem to be geared to people that sell. I like my CC 1501 loaf mold, it's the perfect size for my needs and I don't see myself getting anything much bigger in the future. That being said can anyone suggest a good quality soap cutter for my needs? I want to be able to wash it so I would prefer it not be wood. I have two loaf cutters that I'm happy with but I don't see a wire cutter that I would be able to use for...lets say a mantra cut. So I'm not sure if I just need a cutter to replace my pastry knife or if I need the whole set up...
 

JuneP

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 29, 2014
Messages
713
Reaction score
290
Location
Eagle Point, Oregon
Why not just get a cheese cutter. That's what some of us use and it works well with CP soaps. You can find them on Amazon.com and they're very easy to use and reasonably priced.
 

rparrny

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2015
Messages
512
Reaction score
325
Location
NY
Why not just get a cheese cutter. That's what some of us use and it works well with CP soaps. You can find them on Amazon.com and they're very easy to use and reasonably priced.
I went on to Amazon first...I only saw two that would look like it would be okay to use for my loaf cutters and they both had a lot of reviews about it breaking easily. Which one did you purchase?
 

lenarenee

Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2014
Messages
3,502
Reaction score
3,052
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00004S1DU/?tag=skimlinks_replacement-20

I recently bought this one even though I drooled over the Bud Haffner, and the Crossroads single bar cutters. Crossroads is not selling at the moment (was less expensive than Bud's, but Clyde Yoshida and Kenny the messy soaper on YouTube both use Crossroads).

Since I don't sell, and also needed (okay...wanted....but I get a lot of ash on my soaps) a soap planer, I just couldn't justify the cost.

So for $15 dollars I thought the cheese cutter would be worth the gamble. And I'm very happy with it - a big improvement compared to my previous methods of cutting.

I also use CC 1501. The only small issue is that the load can slide a little when you cut...but simply apply some back pressure easily cured that.

I also purchased a silicone mat to experiment with to see of that helps prevent the sliding but I haven't bothered yet, as just holding the loaf firmly and slightly pushing back has worked well for me.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

JuneP

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 29, 2014
Messages
713
Reaction score
290
Location
Eagle Point, Oregon
I bought the Prodyne 805B Thick Beech wood Cheese Slicer. It works just fine for cutting soap. I think people who may have had problems were slicing hard cheese. This cutter is inexpensive, stores easily and cuts like a dream.


I went on to Amazon first...I only saw two that would look like it would be okay to use for my loaf cutters and they both had a lot of reviews about it breaking easily. Which one did you purchase?
 

rparrny

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2015
Messages
512
Reaction score
325
Location
NY
I bought the Prodyne 805B Thick Beech wood Cheese Slicer. It works just fine for cutting soap. I think people who may have had problems were slicing hard cheese. This cutter is inexpensive, stores easily and cuts like a dream.
Okay, I just ordered it thank you! Several reviewers mentioned that you have to cut the soap while still soft...what do you find? Do you cut your soap the next day? With my pastry knife, I have had to wait a week or more to prevent skid lines.
 

lenarenee

Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2014
Messages
3,502
Reaction score
3,052
It's hard to answer that without knowing what you consider "soft" to be. The loaves I cut were quite firm - handling them, picking them up, turning them over didn't leave dents or fingerprints.

If I were to compare it to cheese - the soap was like the blocks of cheddar from the grocery store, but not "extra sharp". Definitely not as soft as Monterey Jack - still quite squishable with firm pressure.

In other words, I don't feel the need to cut my soap any sooner than I usually would.
 

JuneP

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 29, 2014
Messages
713
Reaction score
290
Location
Eagle Point, Oregon
Depends on your recipe, I think. I cut my latest soap 3 days after making. It had 48% hard oils, 28% Lye Concentration, and 2% sodium lactate. It cut very easily. I'm sure it would have been fine even it had been in the mold longer.
 

Latest posts

Top