Rebatching for over-fragrancing?

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narnia

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I made some HP GM soap and added too much FO. If I decide to rebatch, what is the procedure?

How old can soap be before it's too late to rebatch?

When rebatching, do I cook the fresh batch first and add the old batch after the cook? Since I am using GM HP soap, I am afraid that if I cook the old batch at the beginning with the new, the GM from the old batch may become overcooked and scorch.
 

dixiedragon

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Didn't you JUST MAKE this soap? Seriously, relax. Give it a week.

If after a week you still don't like it, confetti soap is easier than rebatch. Just cut your soap into smallish chunks. You have some options here - you can shred it (I like to use a Salad Shooter), you can dice it, or you can even use something like a wire cheese slicer to cut it into long strips. Make a new batch of soap and mix your old soap with the new soap in a (roughly) 50/50 ratio. I always put my confetti soap in the oven, b/c you want to be sure it gels. The gelling makes the old soap and new soap stick together.
 

traderbren

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I'm getting so confused with all these threads of yours...

In the other thread, it was suggested that you should let the soap cure a little before deciding if you need to rebatch. I agree with that suggestion. Many fragrances mellow as they cure. Take a step back, let this batch cure for a bit. Read up some more on soap making, GM soap, and rebatching. If you still feel it's over-scented in 2 weeks or so, you can still rebatch.

If you are worried about needing to make soap for gifts for the holidays, then now is the time to rethink that idea or try melt and pour.
 

narnia

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Dixiedragon, what you describe sounds the same as rebatching... What is the diff between confetti soap and rebatching?
 

dixiedragon

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Same batch. The round bar did not gel. The rectangle bar did.
Rebatching you don't add new soap. And you completely (or almost completely) melt the soap.

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narnia

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I'm getting so confused with all these threads of yours...

In the other thread, it was suggested that you should let the soap cure a little before deciding if you need to rebatch. I agree with that suggestion. Many fragrances mellow as they cure. Take a step back, let this batch cure for a bit. Read up some more on soap making, GM soap, and rebatching. If you still feel it's over-scented in 2 weeks or so, you can still rebatch.

If you are worried about needing to make soap for gifts for the holidays, then now is the time to rethink that idea or try melt and pour.
I am rethinking this now, since I did add the maximum amount. I think that the scent will be too strong even after the cure, since we can't even tolerate being around it in the next room, so I am considering rebatching.

My lavender and lemongrass batch, on the other hand, smells just right. I used the default fragrance ratio of .5 and it worked out great, so yes, I am really concerned about the OM&H FO.
 

dixiedragon

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Also, if you rebatch (meaning completely melt down the soap) the fragrance might burn off. I'm not sure about that, I melted down a batch and the fragrance (WSP Black Raspberry Vanilla, for the record) is still there and strong. It probably depends on the flash point and other things.
 

kchaystack

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Rebatching is a pain. It really should be the last resort, like forgetting to add an oil, or discovering you over measured your lye.

But then, you really have not paid much attention to what most people have been telling you so you are probably going to do it anyway.
 

galaxyMLP

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I've added the maximum amount of FO/EO MANY times with MANY different FOs. Some stuck and some didn't. Even in HP. And I've done many batches of both CP and HP. You don't know about scent until at least a few weeks in. I know you're eager but soap is not something for the impatient. I know becasue I was there once. Please don't keep starting new threads.

Threads are organic things. They can grow into new topics and questions especially if it's all based on the same batch. Rule of thumb I would say is if its about 1 batch of soap, keep it in the same thread. You can ask all of your questions calmly and it lets people know this is about the same thing. It's very hard to keep remembering different things you asked in different places. Soap making has many different things that can effect it so when you post about the same batch multiple places it disorients people and you get alot of repeat information. That helps neither you or the person answering questions.

Please understand I'm not trying to be mean. It's just getting increasingly difficult to answer becasue its like you're only reading/hearing the parts of anyone's posts that you want to read/hear. It makes people not want to answer questions at all. :(
 

narnia

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I have read and listened to what people say, but I can't implement everything, as there have been different opinions on many topics.

I feel that rebatching is a separate question. If I asked this question in "how to cure scented soaps," someone who is experienced in rebatching may not care to read my thread to answer, as there would be no clue that I am asking a rebatching question. I don't see why anyone would need to know what batch or all the details of my soap journey has been in order to tell me how to do a rebatch.
Please understand I'm not trying to be mean. It's just getting increasingly difficult to answer

Thank you for your effort, but if it is difficult to answer, please do not stress yourself to answer, as there are others who may feel more inclined.

becasue its like you're only reading/hearing the parts of anyone's posts that you want to read/hear.

Those are your perceptions, which are not true. I have read and heard what everyone has said and learned TONS of new and wonderful info! I have soooo appreciated everyone who has contributed!

It makes people not want to answer questions at all.
:(
I'm so sorry...you sound frustrated. If you "do not want to answer my questions at all," please don't feel obligated. People who have the grace to answer, should be the ones to answer.
 
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Arimara

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How about you wait a few weeks before you think of rebatching. I tried my hand at it once and I can tell you, I rather donate the terrible soap I made. But for now, it's way to early to tell if you need to rebatch.

With the time it takes for you soap to cure and the scents of them to dissipate, why not do a forum search about rebatching. it'll give you a better perspective overall and probably keep stress levels down. or if the scent is too strong for your liking by mid January-ish, give them away as hand soap. It'll save you the aggravation and by then, you may have learned a little more about the soapmaking process.

Overall, it just seems like you're trying to do a lot in a short amount of time. There's no rush for this and it is not a race. Make a few batches of basic soap using the common grocery oils. Get more familiar and comfy with just making soap before you branch off again to milk soaps and what not. I guess that's what some of us want from you.
 

DeeAnna

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"...People who have the grace to answer, should be the ones to answer. ..."

No, that's just plain rude. If anyone has grace and patience, it's Galaxy. YOU need to have the grace to use some restraint, not blame others for not meeting your needs. I've been following your threads and there's not a lot of indication from the progression of the questions your throwing out that you're learning anything about soaping.

There is no reason to critique the behavior of other folks when they make a reasonable request. It's you, not them. Just slow down.
 

doriettefarm

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I'll have to agree with the folks who are telling you to slow down. It's like you're attempting to cram everything I learned in my first year of soaping into a few short weeks! It's just not possible no matter how many batches and tweaks you make in that timeframe to know what your end result will be. Although the HP/CP soap may be safe to use in days to a week it isn't the best it can be. So please hang onto a sample bar from each batch so you can test and compare results at 6 weeks vs 6 months vs 1 year. The difference will amaze you but you must have enough patience to get there.

I get the impression you're in a big rush to give these soaps as Christmas gifts. Totally understandable but really at this point it's too late even for HP. Might I suggest a few alternatives if you happen to have the correct supplies: lip balms, lotion bars, salves, salt/sugar scrubs, bath bombs, even liquid soap. If you have KOH (potassium hydroxide), making liquid soap isn't too much different than HP and it's much easier to control the amount of fragrance.

And my advice for saving your over-fragranced batch of OMH HP, would also be give it time. Lots of FOs will fade initially then come back strong, others will totally morph and smell much different in the finished soap than in the bottle. I'm also not a fan of rebatching and would much rather grate up the overscented soap for use as confetti in a CP batch . . . but you still have to wait for it to cure properly.
 

Arimara

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I would suggest against liquid soap making until patience has been established. If you're not ready for that step and don't prepare yourself for any problems that could arise to the best of your abilities, you can and most likely will get flustered. It's easy to do liquid soap but I see it as an intermediate project do a soaper. KOH doesn't behave like NaOH does.
 

shunt2011

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You have received some excellent advice. Also, if you take the time to read some of the forum stickies as well as some of the forum posts starting at least 10 pages back you will get answers to many of your questions.

I agree with the others that you are all over the place and are making it extremely difficult to offer help. You need to take one step at a time and get the process down.

Many of your questions/problems have been answered numerous times. We don't mind helping but you need to also help yourself.

Nobody is being mean but you are being extremely rude in your own behavior.

This is one of the most kind helpful groups you will likely find.
 

dixiedragon

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I have read and listened to what people say, but I can't implement everything, as there have been different opinions on many topics.

I feel that rebatching is a separate question. If I asked this question in "how to cure scented soaps," someone who is experienced in rebatching may not care to read my thread to answer, as there would be no clue that I am asking a rebatching question. I don't see why anyone would need to know what batch or all the details of my soap journey has been in order to tell me how to do a rebatch.


I'm so sorry...you sound frustrated. If you "do not want to answer my questions at all," please don't feel obligated. People who have the grace to answer, should be the ones to answer.
This reply was pretty darn rude. You have been told by at least two folks as nicely as possible that you are going against the forum culture. At this point, you're the person at the nice restaurant eating her crème brulee with her hands and licking the bowl.

I understand you are excited, but I am rapidly reaching the point where I am going to stop replying to your questions and posting on your threads.
1) You ask the same questions multiple times and ignore the answers.
2) You have multiple nearly-identical threads going and so people are giving you the same information multiple times.
3) You have nicely been asked to stop. To the point that a mod has deleted one of your threads.

Please respect the forum culture, its members and it's time.
 

Susie

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You also need to make ONE batch at the time, and WAIT for it to cure 4-6 weeks BEFORE making other soap. This is the only way you are going to know what you like or don't like in a soap. THEN you can tweak your recipe and WAIT for that to cure before changing again.

As for the strong FO soap, put it outside, or in the garage, or the attic, or anywhere you can't smell it, and WAIT.

Please, for the love of all things soapy, do NOT start making liquid soap until you have figured out that you need to go in one direction at the time.
 

cmzaha

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As for the liquid soap, I firmly agree not to make it until you are completely comfortable with making bar soap and learn how to deal with problems. Just a few degrees in temp change can cause liquid soap to volcano out of your pot. It has it own set of problems. I use almost all fo's and eo's at 6% in my soaps. Once in a while I end up with one to strong but not often. Rebatching is a pain in the backside and creates ugly soap. Keep in mind you cannot rush the soap process or the learning curve, so take a breath, slow down and enjoy the learning curve
 

narnia

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I apologize for any offense or irritation. My attitude was not intending to be rude in any way. What I was trying to say with all good intentions, is that one should not answer if not so inclined. Written words without facial expressions or vocal inflection can be so misconstrued.

Yes...the whole problem is the frantic rush that I have been in. Christmas. Under normal circumstances, I would have been much more patient. Thank you for your patience with me!

It's like you're attempting to cram everything I learned in my first year of soaping into a few short weeks!

I get the impression you're in a big rush to give these soaps as Christmas gifts. Totally understandable but really at this point it's too late even for HP.
Yes, your perceptions are right on! I never realized just how complex soapmaking was!! And it is NOT for the impatient!!
 

The Efficacious Gentleman

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I apologize for any offense or irritation. My attitude was not intending to be rude in any way. What I was trying to say with all good intentions, is that one should not answer if not so inclined. Written words without facial expressions or vocal inflection can be so misconstrued.

Yes...the whole problem is the frantic rush that I have been in. Christmas. Under normal circumstances, I would have been much more patient. Thank you for your patience with me!



Yes, your perceptions are right on! I never realized just how complex soapmaking was!! And it is NOT for the impatient!!
Narnia, you have been sent a PM regarding multiple posts back-to-back - PLEASE STOP! The PM was not just for fun.
 
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