Quick question, well and septic tank

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Tara_H

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Is there anyone else out there that can't tolerate the feel of microfiber cloth on their hands?
Yep! It makes my skin crawl. We stayed at my MILs house one time and she had some kind of microfibre sheets :eek: I spent the whole night trying to avoid touching them with the palms of my hands or the soles of my feet... Not very restful!
 

Vicki C

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Question to all, what is the feeling about letting soapy dishes sit for a day until the soap is (pretty much) saponified and then running through the dishwasher. Bad idea? Asking for a friend... 😬
 

Vicki C

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Is there anyone else out there that can't tolerate the feel of microfiber cloth on their hands? It makes my hands feel scaly, sort of like mini-cockleburs all over. I used to just put on latex gloves to use them, then discovered if they were wet, they are fine to use. I keep one by the sink, knock it into the sink and wet it down, then I can pick it up to use it...bared handed, no less!
This makes me feel less crazy - I have the same aversion. Hate that feeling.
 

Gaisy59

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I'm on a septic & drain field system so I hope adding to this thread isn't going to jinx me...

I use cheap flour sack towels I get at Walmart (link below) to wipe out my soap mixing containers & spatulas soon after soaping.

Walmart Flour Sack Towels
Yes! Perfect. And cheap too. Wish i knew about these before i bought my wipes.
 

Gaisy59

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Microplastics and nylons and rayons never crossed our minds unless it was nylon stockings with a seam down the back. For a night on the town, maybe?

But before that, we made our own cotton or wool garments and linens by hand. Some wove, knitted, crocheted, embellished, etc. our own linens & garments. We washed by hand in a bucket or barrel using a wash board
View attachment 57043

or later got a wringer washer.
(My mom had one of these when I was little.)

Or like my mother's mother who did not have indoor plumbing except a pump from the well to bring water to the kitchen (and no indoor toilet - only an outhouse), the waste water from washing was tossed out onto the ground outdoors, or often a well-placed disposal area planned specifically to utilize the spent water if the area tended to be arid.

Yes, I remember the water pump in the kitchen and the outhouse. Every time we visited up until grandfather's second wife insisted on installation of indoor plumbing. I think that was around the late 1950's to early 1960's when they finally installed a WC. It was such a pain in the patootie to wander out in the dark carrying a torch down a dry rocky path with cactus and rattlesnakes about to use the privy in the middle of the night! Visiting my mom's dad was a real adventure! He was a crusty old guy, I can tell you that.

And yes, even I used a bucket, a big stick, & rung the clothes out by hand when we went camping when my kids were little, at least until I found a nearby town with a laundromat. But until then, it was the old-fashioned way of washing laundry and hanging them to dry on a line (at least when we were camping.) Thankfully I have enjoyed the luxury of indoor plumbing everywhere I have lived from my birth forward.
OMG yes yes and yes. I too have lived through the wringer/washer. In fact i thought they were all gone until i went to college and my landlady had one. She was surprised i knew how to use it. And the pump and outhouse (my uncles), or the country outhouse where my cousin and I had to use an old catalog to wipe with, and i still have my moms old scrub board. Lol thanks for taking me down memory lane.
 

earlene

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Is there anyone else out there that can't tolerate the feel of microfiber cloth on their hands? It makes my hands feel scaly, sort of like mini-cockleburs all over. I used to just put on latex gloves to use them, then discovered if they were wet, they are fine to use. I keep one by the sink, knock it into the sink and wet it down, then I can pick it up to use it...bared handed, no less!
Old often-washed microfiber cloths become almost brittle feeling, apparently related to how they are washed. I have read information about how to wash them so that this doesn't happen, so I am sharing a couple of links:

 

Vicki C

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Old often-washed microfiber cloths become almost brittle feeling, apparently related to how they are washed. I have read information about how to wash them so that this doesn't happen, so I am sharing a couple of links:

That’s helpful thanks - I get that weird scratchy feeling even when they are brand new.
 

SoapMedic

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Am reading this thread at just the right time. We are cleaning out my mom’s home (she passed away in December) and new are probably going to sell our house and buy my brother’s half to move there. It’s on well and septic and I have been discouraged about it to the point of considering giving up soaping. Now I have some ideas to think about. Thanks!:)
 

KimW

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Am reading this thread at just the right time. We are cleaning out my mom’s home (she passed away in December) and new are probably going to sell our house and buy my brother’s half to move there. It’s on well and septic and I have been discouraged about it to the point of considering giving up soaping. Now I have some ideas to think about. Thanks!:)
Oh. I'm sorry to hear about your Mom. I'm sure it would be sweetly sentimental to move there.
If you do, you might consider having the septic and well systems inspected. In our area this is usually about $200 for each, but might be worth it if your Mom's well and septic are over 10 years old. This is what we were told when we looked at buying some of the older houses in our Village. When we decided to build, our septic guy told us to start right away with at least bi-monthly enzyme treatments for our new septic.
Not because I'm a soaper, but because that's what he's used on his system that's now over 30 yrs old. He has various winter hobbies that require washing up and unavoidably introduce some gunk into his septic. Any natural enzyme treatment will do - "just read the reviews".
 

Cheeky Goat

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I live in South Florida, and we have a well and septic. This house was a foreclosure when we bought it, so I had the septic system evaluated and checked before we purchased.
It was healthy, so I didn’t have to do much with it asides keep it healthy.
I get it pumped once a year, and use enzymes to run through once a month.

I wipe my soap dishes down, use the microfiber (that Also makes my skin crawl, I use gloves always) and let sit overnight. Then I run through my soap/studio specific dishwasher, with Dawn detergent as the soap. I also run my silicon molds through my top opening washing with Dawn that is in my barn.

I’ve had my studio for 3 years now, and making soap for 5, and no issues yet. (Knocks frantically on wood)
 

dibbles

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We have had the septic protector @KimW linked above for years. My hubby knows the guy who invented it and bought it from him when he was just starting his business. I don't remember what we paid for it back then, but I think he has sold his company. I will say, if we had to replace it for some reason, it is completely worth the money IMO, and I would do it again. The amount of microfibers it collects from each load of laundry is eye opening. We've had to replace the filter bags a couple of times, but since we've become empty nesters with much less laundry I can't remember the last time we needed new ones. I'm talking about this one: Filtrol 160 Washing Machine Lint Trap Filter | Free Shipping!
 
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