Question About Solid Dish Soap

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MysPhoenix

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Am I correct in my understanding that to make a solid bar of dish soap, you just don't have a SF, or at least not a very high one? How much of a role do the chosen oils play? I mostly see others using 100% CO but I have also seen one or two that is 100% OO. My plan was to use 100% CO, with only a 1% SF just so I have a little cushion even if it is tiny. Is it okay to add scent to it? Like Orange 10x EO because I like citrusy dish soaps - I would use Lemon EO if I weren't out completely and it's okay to do so.
 

Quanta

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The reason for using coconut oil, is its high cleansing value. Basically, it strips oil which is what you want in a dish soap. Personally I wouldn't use olive oil unless it's all you have.

Regarding citrus EO in CP soap, it tends to not stick at all so it would be wasted. I wouldn't use a synthetic fragrance oil in soap meant for washing food contact surfaces, so you may want to consider just leaving it unscented.
 

AliOop

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I've had pretty good luck with folded lemon EO and folded orange EO in my 100% CO, 0%SF HP dish soap. It isn't strong, but there is definitely some scent there.

It's one time that I definitely prefer HP, since I can add the EO after the cook (so the scent sticks longer) and because I don't care about having a perfectly smooth dish cake.
 

dibbles

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I just packed two bars made with 10x Orange EO into a donation box. The soap was made in October of 2020 and while certainly not strong, the scent was still pleasant. @Mobjack Bay has made a few posts about using orange wax which seems to stick pretty well. You might check that out.
 

Zany_in_CO

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SHORT STORY:
Here's how I found the best dish washing soap. It doesn't matter which soap you use, just fill the sink with warm to hot water. Throw in a cuddle of salt (as much as fits in the cup of your hand); swish it around to dissolve it; then "wash" your bar of soap in it until you have copious lather. The water is now ready to wash dishes, even pots and pans, squeaky clean.

I found this out while washing batches of 2-week old soap to "smooth" them. I learned to do that from a Martha Stewart episode where she was taught to make Castile Soap. ;) I do it fairly often but not always. I generally have 16 bars in a batch. After washing that many bars, I have lots of lather. I leave it in the sink to wash whatever dishes I use that day.

TIP:When using bar soap, whether for hair, laundry or dishes, it's important to rinse thoroughly in cold water to remove any soap residue. :thumbs:
 

MysPhoenix

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The reason for using coconut oil, is its high cleansing value. Basically, it strips oil which is what you want in a dish soap. Personally I wouldn't use olive oil unless it's all you have.

Regarding citrus EO in CP soap, it tends to not stick at all so it would be wasted. I wouldn't use a synthetic fragrance oil in soap meant for washing food contact surfaces, so you may want to consider just leaving it unscented.
Thank you for explaining! I primarily HP. I did 2 batches of CP soap this past week (my first time) and I am pleased!
I had no plans to use FOs on it, I was just thinking a citrusy scent would be pleasant/nice.

Your NaOH isn't 100% pure, and it degrades with contact with air, so your SF will always be slightly higher than calculated. Also, a slight but truly negative SF will even out over time as NaOH reacts with air.
So even though the bottles says 100%, it isn't really 100%?? I also did not know NaOH would dissipate due to reacting with air. I am definitely going to research these things tomorrow! Thank you.

I've had pretty good luck with folded lemon EO and folded orange EO in my 100% CO, 0%SF HP dish soap. It isn't strong, but there is definitely some scent there.

It's one time that I definitely prefer HP, since I can add the EO after the cook (so the scent sticks longer) and because I don't care about having a perfectly smooth dish cake.
I planned on HP for this, if for no other reason than the high amount of CO. I have volcano paranoia.

I just packed two bars made with 10x Orange EO into a donation box. The soap was made in October of 2020 and while certainly not strong, the scent was still pleasant. @Mobjack Bay has made a few posts about using orange wax which seems to stick pretty well. You might check that out.
Nice! Thank you!

SHORT STORY:
Here's how I found the best dish washing soap. It doesn't matter which soap you use, just fill the sink with warm to hot water. Throw in a cuddle of salt (as much as fits in the cup of your hand); swish it around to dissolve it; then "wash" your bar of soap in it until you have copious lather. The water is now ready to wash dishes, even pots and pans, squeaky clean.

I found this out while washing batches of 2-week old soap to "smooth" them. I learned to do that from a Martha Stewart episode where she was taught to make Castile Soap. ;) I do it fairly often but not always. I generally have 16 bars in a batch. After washing that many bars, I have lots of lather. I leave it in the sink to wash whatever dishes I use that day.

TIP:When using bar soap, whether for hair, laundry or dishes, it's important to rinse thoroughly in cold water to remove any soap residue. :thumbs:
That is really dang clever! I am definitely going to do this tomorrow, lol. Thank you so much for the "life/soap hack"!
 

GemstonePony

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So even though the bottles says 100%, it isn't really 100%?? I also did not know NaOH would dissipate due to reacting with air.
At the time of manufacturing it might be close, but since it reacts to air, that percentage gets lower over time and also as the amount of air in the container increases. I think somebody around here had a tutorial for calculating lye purity, but I don't remember who. Anyways, I usually wouldn't worry about it unless your lye is old or clumpy. If your lye is reasonably new and it's been in a full container, it's probably close to that 100% mark. Just know your SF may be higher than selected as time goes on and you use it. If you're doing small batches and your scale isn't super accurate, you're probably rounding the lye measurements down and increasing your SF a bit anyways, so a bit more for most soaps isn't usually a big deal.
Setting the calculator for a -1% may not be truly negative particularly for a mostly empty bottle of lye, and even if it's a little negative it will usually cure out in a few months because the lye will degrade in an open environment. That's the pro and con of working with such a reactive substance.
 

Zany_in_CO

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earlene

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So even though the bottles says 100%, it isn't really 100%?? I also did not know NaOH would dissipate due to reacting with air. I am definitely going to research these things tomorrow! Thank you.
At the time of manufacturing it might be close, but since it reacts to air, that percentage gets lower over time and also as the amount of air in the container increases. I think somebody around here had a tutorial for calculating lye purity, but I don't remember who.
Part of the issue is that lye purity to the manufacturer may also mean, how much non-lye material (other metals, or other contaminants, for example) may be mixed in with the actual lye. So when I buy 100% lye at the hardware store, it does not necessarily mean that no air got into the container during packaging to interact with the lye (before the seal was secured on the bottle). What it means is that the manufacturer packaged lye and only lye (no other metal ions, or whatever else might be added to lye for other products).

To the soap maker, however, lye purity is more along the lines of 'how much water has this lye leached out of the surrounding air'?

More about lye 'purity' and how to test for it:


Here is another thread (of many threads) that discussed lye purity and the first post has an example of a non-pure lye and what other contaminants were listed on the container. In that thread there is discussion about the perception of purity from the soapmaker's standpoint versus the manufacturer's point of view.
 

MysPhoenix

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Part of the issue is that lye purity to the manufacturer may also mean, how much non-lye material (other metals, or other contaminants, for example) may be mixed in with the actual lye. So when I buy 100% lye at the hardware store, it does not necessarily mean that no air got into the container during packaging to interact with the lye (before the seal was secured on the bottle). What it means is that the manufacturer packaged lye and only lye (no other metal ions, or whatever else might be added to lye for other products).

To the soap maker, however, lye purity is more along the lines of 'how much water has this lye leached out of the surrounding air'?

More about lye 'purity' and how to test for it:


Here is another thread (of many threads) that discussed lye purity and the first post has an example of a non-pure lye and what other contaminants were listed on the container. In that thread there is discussion about the perception of purity from the soapmaker's standpoint versus the manufacturer's point of view.
Thank you!!
 

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