Pringle Cans

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kmarvel

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Those are gorgeous!!! Don't you just love it when you find free molds that are that cute? I'm gonna have to keep my eyes open in the yogurt aisle from now on. Niiiiice........very nice. :clap:

I used someone's calculations for one Pringle Can. It must have been the mini can because it filled the Pringle can maybe to 1/3rd. :sad:

So, I got another pringle can and filled it with water. 32 oz. (maybe an inch from the top)

Can I go from there in a soapcalc and figure out how much oils/water I need??

I am on a qwest to make Pringle soap. haha

Kathie
 

Seawolfe

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Katie, a sort of cheat I use is to fill my mold with water like you did, and then weigh or measure the water like you did - 32 oz.

Then, since the default water as percent of oils is 38% on soap calc, I figure the oils at 62% to start with. So 62% of 32 oz is 19.84 ounces, round up to 20 ounces.

Now, this 62% should be a little low because oils weigh less than water, but its a starting point. Punch 20 ounces of total oils into soap calc in field number 2 (set to ounces, not pounds). Fill out your superfat percentage and oil percentages, then hit "calculate recipe" button and check for errors, and then hit "view or print recipe" button. On the recipe page that it generates look at the line that says "Soap weight before CP cure or HP cook" - under ounces is it close to 32 ounces? If yes you're done, if no go and fiddle with the amount oils you put in field number 2 until it tells you that your final weight matches your target.

I know that soap weight does not exactly match water volume, but this works well for my tiny mind.
 

seannasmommy

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I too have used pringles cans and lined them with freezer paper. I had an issue with not lining one once and it volcanoed and overheated. Once I lined them I never had a problem and I could use them more than once. Your experience may vary.

Mine volcanoed slightly without paper, so I'm going to try lining it next time.
 

kmarvel

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Seawolfe,

I will wrap my head around the above thread. Thank you ever so much!
I will let you know how this turns out. :)
Hopefully will get them made on Sunday.

Kathie the math challenged ole bat. haha
 

AnnaO

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I used someone's calculations for one Pringle Can. It must have been the mini can because it filled the Pringle can maybe to 1/3rd. :sad:

So, I got another pringle can and filled it with water. 32 oz. (maybe an inch from the top)

Can I go from there in a soapcalc and figure out how much oils/water I need??

I am on a qwest to make Pringle soap. haha

Kathie

Here is my original calculation and soapcalc screen from my soap notes:



The soap batter filled all but the top ~1/4" of the tube.
I used 712.5g of oils, which equates to just over 25 ounces.
I do not know if UK Pringles tubes are a different size, I measured mine in cm but here's a useful metric to Imperial conversion tool website if you want to check:

http://www.metric-conversions.org/converter.htm
 

kmarvel

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AnnaO,

This is funny because there was another person from England, I believe, that gave me the same measurements: 712.5 gr = 25.13 oz.

Our US Pringle Can holds 32 oz of water (about an inch full from the top of the can)

When I made the "batch" this morning it filled maybe a third of the can!!!! oops.

So, I am not sure where I went wrong. I can tell you I do not understand math formulas or "Pi", etc.

I use 6 oils. OO, CCO, Castor, Palm, Grapeseed, and Shea Butter.

Thank you for the chart. I will try to work with it to see if I can make a full Pringle can of soap. :)
 

kmarvel

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Seawolfe, I hate to keep bugging you. sorry.

I used your method from above and played with the soapcalc, of which I am getting more comfortable with. (Thank you)

I got the soap weight to a little over 29 oz. Of which I am good with. :)

How does my soap quality range look?? I want hard, sudsy and conditioning. I thought it looked ok.


Soap Bar Quality
Range
Your Recipe
Hardness
29 - 54
37
Cleansing
12 - 22
14
Conditioning
44 - 69
60
Bubbly
14 - 46
17
Creamy
16 - 48
27
Iodine
41 - 70
63
INS
136 - 165
143
 

AnnaO

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AnnaO,

This is funny because there was another person from England, I believe, that gave me the same measurements: 712.5 gr = 25.13 oz.

Our US Pringle Can holds 32 oz of water (about an inch full from the top of the can)

When I made the "batch" this morning it filled maybe a third of the can!!!! oops.

So, I am not sure where I went wrong. I can tell you I do not understand math formulas or "Pi", etc.

I use 6 oils. OO, CCO, Castor, Palm, Grapeseed, and Shea Butter.

Thank you for the chart. I will try to work with it to see if I can make a full Pringle can of soap. :)

Well it's not really all that funny.... because it was me :)
I measured the dimensions of my Pringles tube in centimetres, and from that I calculated the volume. Then using the volume I worked out the amount of oil needed using instructions from the sticky thread on calculating amount of oils for mould size. I used centimetres because I find them easier to work with than inches in situations like this.

But if you have an inch rule to hand, and a calculator, then you can work out the volume of your Pringles tube in cubic inches by following these steps:

1. measure the height of the tube in inches - call this 'h'
2. measure the diameter of the tube - the width of the circle - then halve this number to get the radius - call this 'r'
3. pi - this number is roughly 3.142

The volume of your Pringles tube, in cubic inches, is h x r x r x 3.142
That is the mathematical formula for working out the volume of a cylinder.

So you just plug in the numbers to get the volume in cubic inches.
Then you multiply this figure by 0.4 to get the weight of oils needed in ounces.
(If you were working in cubic centimetres then you would multiply by 0.7 - to get oil weight in grams).

But there is another way!

http://convert-to.com/conversion/wa...z-of-water-weight-to-in3-of-water-volume.html

^^^
This is a link to a converter website which I found which will convert oz of water to cubic inches.
If you plug in your 32 oz of water, the volume you get is 55.36 cubic inches of water.
So if you multiply 55.36 by 0.4 you get 22.14 - which is the total ounces of oils.

I hope this helps :)
 
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AnnaO

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Just to say - be sure you input your 'total oil' value in Soapcalc in the 'Weight of Oils' box:
(I'm sure you already know this though )



As you can see you can input the figure in pounds, ounces or grams.

I love Soapcalc, but it took me a good while and lots of practice to get the hang of it. I find the sparkling, moving, flashing ads all around the data input screen horribly distracting. I know it's a free service, but all of that movement on the screen really stops me being able to concentrate!
I find I have to shrink the screen down so that I don't have any ads visible, otherwise I find I can make mistakes, even when I have I checked several times and thought all my figures were fine. I don't know if it is just a 'me' thing, or if it affects others too, but I thought I'd mention it anyway.
:)

Well it's not really all that funny.... because it was me :)
I measured the dimensions of my Pringles tube in centimetres, and from that I calculated the volume. Then using the volume I worked out the amount of oil needed using instructions from the sticky thread on calculating amount of oils for mould size. I used centimetres because I find them easier to work with than inches in situations like this.

But if you have an inch rule to hand, and a calculator, then you can work out the volume of your Pringles tube in cubic inches by following these steps:

1. measure the height of the tube in inches - call this 'h'
2. measure the diameter of the tube - the width of the circle - then halve this number to get the radius - call this 'r'
3. pi - this number is roughly 3.142

The volume of your Pringles tube, in cubic inches, is h x r x r x 3.142
That is the mathematical formula for working out the volume of a cylinder.

So you just plug in the numbers to get the volume in cubic inches.
Then you multiply this figure by 0.4 to get the weight of oils needed in ounces.
(If you were working in cubic centimetres then you would multiply by 0.7).

But there is another way!

http://convert-to.com/conversion/wa...z-of-water-weight-to-in3-of-water-volume.html

^^^
This is a link to a converter website which I found which will convert oz of water to cubic inches.
If you plug in your 32 oz of water, the volume you get is 55.36 cubic inches of water.
So if you multiply 55.36 by 0.4 you get 22.14 - which is the total ounces of oils.

I hope this helps :)

Just to make clear that this last calculation is for the water weight in ounces, using cool, pure water.
kmarvel - I assumed you weighed your water, but now I appreciate that may not be the case.

Incidentally I weighed the water which just about filled my Pringles tube, and it came to 36 oz.
:)
 

kmarvel

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AnnaO,

I thought that sounded familiar when I posted that thread. haha Please, I meant no disrespect at all. I used the soapcalc and punched in 32 oz. when it was all said and done it was a total of 39 oz +. I filled the Pringles can within 2" from the top and then filled a yogurt cup full. (I love those yogurt cup shapes!) So, I always keep my recipes and how much total oils I use, so it is going to work out. Thank you for much for the site for the conversions. You are a HUGE help!! :)
Kathie
 

Jamison

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I have heard the standard shave soap cup is the same size as a Pringles can. They have a 3" diameter base.
I would rather use PVC pipe and line it with freezer paper.
 

djk17

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Pringles
Huh. I find that a standard (not the extra-long ones) Pringles can takes a 1.5 lb recipe.
I found this out by the highly scientific method of
a) making a 3-lb recipe, and
b) observing it filled 2 cans.
I have used calculations in the past with certain types of moulds but honestly, unless you need to be perfectly precise because you absolutely need to be sure to get an exact number of cakes from one can--it's a Pringles can. It's disposable. One pound of soap is not going to break the bank if you have to trim off top and bottom edges.
If you are concerned about not having enough space in the can, a yoghurt container, a cream cheese container, a silicone mini-muffin pan, an ice cube tray--you can have some prepared on the side--make great little travel bars.

I no longer line the can nor cut off the bottom. After I've washed and dried it, I give it an extra slick of mineral oil inside. I got a volcano once but at that time I was soaping much warmer than I do now.
I don't re-use the can; I have friends who eat chips so they save their cans for me :)

BTW I have made some fun swirls by using a piece cardboard (longer than the Pringles can) with notches cut out of the sides. I pour in the colours on each side and then pull the cardboard out, rotating it as I pull it out.
I never know exactly how it will turn out but it's a great deal of fun to find out at the end what I've got.
 

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