1. We are helping test out a new project for soapmakers. Soapmaking Friend. If you are interested in providing feedback and help guide this project to include all you want to see in a recipe builder and calculator please PM an Admin or post in the Announcements forum. Your feedback is really needed!
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Dismiss Notice

Please help!

Discussion in 'Candle Making Forum' started by HappyLove, Jun 24, 2018.

Help Support Soapmaking Forum by donating:

  1. Jun 24, 2018 #1

    HappyLove

    HappyLove

    HappyLove

    Member

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2018
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    USA
    Hello,

    I’ve been trying to research why my candles are drying like this but I cannot figure it out. Is it too much FO? Is it the temperature? Or am I mixing the wax too much throughout the process? (Is it not good to continuously mix?)

    I’m really enjoying making them, but I feel like there’s still a lot of work to do before I can begin to sell. Any advice would be very much appreciated!!

    Thank you :)
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Jun 24, 2018 #2

    msunnerstood

    msunnerstood

    msunnerstood

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2018
    Messages:
    670
    Likes Received:
    877
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    What type of wax are you using? I found when I pour too hot this happens. Can you run a heat gun over to smooth them out?

    Your wicks look burnt already. I havent made candles in a while, is this something new?
     
  3. Jun 24, 2018 #3

    HappyLove

    HappyLove

    HappyLove

    Member

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2018
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    USA
    Thank you for your reply!

    Natural Soy 444 Wax, blended with 2% Universal Soy Wax Additive

    Yes, the candle has been lit, this is how it dries after.. ?
    I am using a wood wick.
     
  4. Jun 24, 2018 #4

    msunnerstood

    msunnerstood

    msunnerstood

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2018
    Messages:
    670
    Likes Received:
    877
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    It appears a bit mottled like maybe the FO hasnt totally been blended. What temp did you pour at? did you warm your containers?
     
  5. Jun 25, 2018 #5

    HappyLove

    HappyLove

    HappyLove

    Member

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2018
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    USA
    I made 4 testers,

    1 - added FO @ 117F, poured @ 112-110F
    2 - added FO @ 120F, poured @ 118-117F
    3 - added FO @ 160F, poured @ 135F
    4 - added FO @ 180F, poured @ 145F

    For all of these, after initial dry they looked wrinkly at the top. And after I burned, they dried like the photos attached. I do tend to mix the wax & FO frequently so I’m not sure if that makes a difference?

    Could it be my FO measurements?

    Also yes, I warmed the jar at my 4th attempt, it helped the wax stick to the jar better, but that’s the only difference I noticed.
     
  6. Jun 25, 2018 #6

    msunnerstood

    msunnerstood

    msunnerstood

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2018
    Messages:
    670
    Likes Received:
    877
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    Another thought, are you cooling these near an air vent? The sunken parts make me think of too rapid cooling.
     
  7. Jun 25, 2018 #7

    lenarenee

    lenarenee

    lenarenee

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2014
    Messages:
    2,987
    Likes Received:
    2,475
    I've never used a soy candle that had a smooth or level top after burning. (speaking as a consumer, and a very occasional candle maker)

    ETA: forgot to mention that many waxes aren't smooth after the first pour and need to be topped off, or a heat gun blown over the top to melt a superficial layer that should re-harden smoother.
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2018
    msunnerstood and HappyLove like this.
  8. Jun 25, 2018 #8

    HappyLove

    HappyLove

    HappyLove

    Member

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2018
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    USA
    thank you all for taking the time to reply.

    So after drying once it has been lit, this is a normal look? I do tend to have my AC cold since I live in Florida, but I do raise the temperature when I am making candles to prevent any defects. I am also going to purchase a heat gun :)

    Please confirm if overmixing is bad? I usually mix the wax a lot.. thank you!!!

    also, the 4th attempt, what are your thoughts on the temperatures?

    added FO @ 180F, poured @ 145F
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 26, 2018
  9. Jun 25, 2018 #9

    msunnerstood

    msunnerstood

    msunnerstood

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2018
    Messages:
    670
    Likes Received:
    877
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    Over mixing can be bad because you will add a bunch of air. I normally tap the sides of my containers to get out air bubbles lower down. Too little mixing though and your fragrance oil wont be blended in.

    Try to pour away from air vents. I usually pour at 140 but 145 isnt bad. The temp for adding fragrance oils depends on the fragrance flash point. Most manufacturers will list the FP on the bottle. Too high and your fragrance will evaporate, too low and it doesnt mix well.

    I second the heat gun advice.
     
    HappyLove likes this.
  10. Jun 26, 2018 #10

    lenarenee

    lenarenee

    lenarenee

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2014
    Messages:
    2,987
    Likes Received:
    2,475
    The problem with candle making (especially with soy wax) is that even though 2 people have exactly the same supplies, their results can be different.
    It takes a lot of trial and error and you have to test every little difference.

    The recessed area of you candle isn't necessarily a problem because soy waxes don't re-harden well. However, I'd really like more experienced people to give their opinion. But on candle forums, I've seen professional chandlers discuss how they no longer try to get a perfect surface after a burn because it just isn't how soy wax works. Their customers are motivated by scent far more than appearance.

    Oh, and there are many source that confuse the idea of flash point. Here's an explanation..... https://support.candlescience.com/h...0030-What-does-the-fragrance-flashpoint-mean-
     
    lyschelw and HappyLove like this.
  11. Jun 26, 2018 #11

    HappyLove

    HappyLove

    HappyLove

    Member

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2018
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    USA
    Thank you everyone. This has helped me so much :thumbs::D
     
  12. Jun 26, 2018 #12

    lenarenee

    lenarenee

    lenarenee

    Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2014
    Messages:
    2,987
    Likes Received:
    2,475
    Glad it did; candles are so incredibly picky. And with the new FDA regulation on hydrogenated oils, the soy wax industry is going through a lot of hiccups with new formulas of wax. Some of them were supposedly able to return to the original formulas, but on craftserver forum that isn't what most people are experiencing.

    I've been playing around with coconut wax and wood wicks. However, I won't be selling candles ever. I make them for my own use; I love wood wick candles (good ones are EXPENSIVE) and I also like uncolored and unscented (hard to find).
     
    HappyLove likes this.
  13. Jun 26, 2018 #13

    jcandleattic

    jcandleattic

    jcandleattic

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2008
    Messages:
    2,469
    Likes Received:
    1,361
    Location:
    Stuck in my head
    I'm here a little late, but wanted to add my .02.
    The look of your candles are a characteristic of soy. There are tricks you can do to minimize them, but they usually never last, and are more of a nuisance than anything else.
    Candlemaking is my first true love, but personally I don't typically work with soy. It's a PITA to work with, get to throw, I don't like the way it looks or the way it holds color, and now with the new FDA regulations as @lenarenee pointed out, there are even more problems with testing soy.
    I'll stick with my tried and true wax formula there never gives me any surprises. :)
     
    lyschelw and HappyLove like this.
  14. Jun 26, 2018 #14

    HappyLove

    HappyLove

    HappyLove

    Member

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2018
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    USA
    thank you!! what candle wax do you recommend?

    I wish I would have known this prior to purchasing 20lbs of soy wax :( Im thinking of returning it and buying a different kind of wax. Just not sure what to get, there are so many different options out there
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 11, 2018
  15. Jun 27, 2018 #15

    jcandleattic

    jcandleattic

    jcandleattic

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2008
    Messages:
    2,469
    Likes Received:
    1,361
    Location:
    Stuck in my head
    I recommend any wax you want to put your time and effort into. I started with paraffin. Dabbled in soy, thinking I would want to switch. Literally after testing the 10lb sample of soy I got, I went back to paraffin. Now I've been working with paraffin for the last 20+ years, and in the last 2 years have started with Palm. Now I will work with both paraffin and palm waxes.
     
    HappyLove likes this.
  16. Jul 11, 2018 #16

    lyschelw

    lyschelw

    lyschelw

    SPONSOR

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2018
    Messages:
    102
    Likes Received:
    46
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    Honestly that is just soy. You will pull your hair out trying to fix it. All candles have trapped air pockets. With soy you just don't see them right away. Sometimes you never see them because as the wax melts it can fill in the holes. To minimize this you can pour cooler and stir the candle while it is setting up. If it is ugly when it is dry you can zap it with a heat gun. But there isn't a whole lot you can do after the first burn. It is a product of soy wax and really not worth your aggravation.
     

Share This Page