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Partial gels... Boo

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Neve

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So I haven't been around much I've been super busy and I moved house. But it's time to start soaping again...

I love my silicone mould but the partial gel drives me crazy. I've tried covered and uncovered. The old place was very hot and the new house gets pretty warm right now too. I get partial gel every time whether I'm trying to gel or trying not to gel. I never had an issue in the wooden mould.

I prefer no gel but I have no room in my fridge or freezer, ever. The basement is cooler but I don't love the idea of walking the freshly made soap down the stairs.

Any suggestions? Ice bricks at the sides maybe? How long would I have to keep it cool for?
 

green soap

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Try keeping both your lye solution and your oils at lower temperature before emulsifying them. Try a steeper water discount, if you have room for it.

If you have a heating EO or FO (clove is notorious) then just embrace the gel!
 

Neve

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Hmm I did both those things on the last batch actually. It set up super fast too... at room temp.
 

Spice

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I thought that all soap had to gel? How does keeping the soap in the freezer/refrig work? :?:
 

raingarden

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Until recently, I thought the gel phase was necessary. I am learning otherwise, but am apprehensive of avoiding it altogether. Had to put an orange clove batch in the freezer recently, and I am amazed that saponification took place despite the cold temps.
 

MorpheusPA

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I thought that all soap had to gel? How does keeping the soap in the freezer/refrig work? :?:
Nope, I've had some that did, some that didn't, and some that partially gelled and got an interesting oval in the center through the loaf of gelled soap surrounded by ungelled.

Putting the soap in the fridge helps keep the temperature down, stopping it from gelling. The freezer does the same thing, but it can get cold enough to stall the saponification process as well, which can restart (and even gel) when you remove it from the freezer.

Gel or no, it'll be soap--gelling just makes soap a little faster, with clearer colors and a somewhat different feel. All things considered, I have no particular preference, but if I want a strong, clear color I tend to gel.

People say that gelled soaps are more durable in water, but since I don't take baths and all my soap dishes have drains or raised soap holders, I don't notice this at home.
 

Spice

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Nope, I've had some that did, some that didn't, and some that partially gelled and got an interesting oval in the center through the loaf of gelled soap surrounded by ungelled.

Putting the soap in the fridge helps keep the temperature down, stopping it from gelling. The freezer does the same thing, but it can get cold enough to stall the saponification process as well, which can restart (and even gel) when you remove it from the freezer.

Gel or no, it'll be soap--gelling just makes soap a little faster, with clearer colors and a somewhat different feel. All things considered, I have no particular preference, but if I want a strong, clear color I tend to gel.

People say that gelled soaps are more durable in water, but since I don't take baths and all my soap dishes have drains or raised soap holders, I don't notice this at home.
Iam going to try the refrig, I like the idea of trying something different.:lol:
 

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