New soapmaker. Titanium dioxide to make soap base white

Soapmaking Forum - Soap & Candle Forums

Help Support Soapmaking Forum - Soap & Candle Forums:

dksoaper

Member
Joined
Dec 6, 2016
Messages
14
Reaction score
0
What type of titanium dioxide to use to make soap base white.

There are many types. It is confusing.

Where is best place to buy and price, without outrageous shipping costs?

Thanks! Doris
 

DeeAnna

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2013
Messages
13,569
Reaction score
19,715
Location
USA
Is there a reason why you think you need TD to make your soap white? Do you know you can make soap that is white without the use of TD?

Why not explain your concerns first, so we have some perspective about why you might need TD -- or why you might be fine without it. Just sayin'....
 

CaraBou

Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Dec 25, 2012
Messages
3,078
Reaction score
3,178
Location
Montana
What do you mean by "so many different types"? I only know of oil soluble and water soluble. I wouldn't worry about degrees of white. I use the water soluble kind because it is easy to mix.

TD is pretty cheap and it lasts a long time. Try Nurture Soap. You just need a $15 minimum for free shipping. Pick up a mica or two and you're there.
 

Obsidian

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2013
Messages
10,407
Reaction score
8,347
Location
Idaho, USA
I like water soluable TD too, it's simple to work with and works perfectly for me.
 

DeeAnna

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2013
Messages
13,569
Reaction score
19,715
Location
USA
I agree w The Gent and Obsidian -- I've only seen water soluble and oil soluble forms of TD. Pretty simple.

I use water soluble, but others get good results with oil soluble. I'd say try one and see how it works for you.

But I still am curious about the perception that soap can't be white without using TD.
 

BattleGnome

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2016
Messages
1,652
Reaction score
1,468
I've seen enough YouTube soapers that seem to add it. At first I was curious and assumed soap was naturally not white, then I started making soap and realized it didn't matter.

In reference to the original question: I have td that is both oil and water soluble, I've used it maybe twice. The first time I cared about measuring and being as precise as my other colors, the second I dumped it in to offset a discoloring fo. Don't think I needed it the first time, the second time my fo discolored anyway.
 

Steve85569

Supporting Member
Joined
Oct 28, 2015
Messages
1,916
Reaction score
2,122
Location
North East Oregon, USA
dksoaper,
PM me and we can chat about shipping costs. I have extra TD and I'm willing to send you some for the shipping costs. If you are in the USA a small flat rate box is the cost.
It's water soluble and food grade - not that I would intentionally eat it.

I do not use much and I have nearly a kilo ( it was inexpensive).

Welcome to the forum.
 

DeeAnna

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2013
Messages
13,569
Reaction score
19,715
Location
USA
I recently started to use TD for my swirled designs when I want a dead white accent or to lighten a color to a pastel.

But I don't add it to my soap batter as a routine thing. The recipes I use make white soap without TD. Maybe not the opaque chalky white of TD, granted, but still nicely white.
 

Dahila

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2013
Messages
2,624
Reaction score
1,843
Location
Canada, Ontario
when you use extra virgin OO it will be greenish, I use Kirkland and add a bit of zinc oxide and it beautiful white
 

IrishLass

Staff member
Admin
Moderator
Joined
Feb 11, 2008
Messages
17,394
Reaction score
11,230
Location
Right here, silly!
I would have to say that there are actually 3 kinds of TD- water soluble, oil soluble, and the kind that Brambleberry sells that is both oil and water soluble, some of which I have on hand (as well as BattleGnome, I see): https://www.brambleberry.com/Titanium-Dioxide-Pigment-P4040.aspx

Any of them are completely fine to use in soap to either add whiteness or to lighten up a color so that it is more pastel, etc.. I've used each of the 3 types with no issues in my soap. Which one to choose will depend on what medium you desire to use to mix it (water or oil) before adding to your soap batter. Having said that, though, you never have to worry about what kind of TD to buy if you are like me and use vegetable glycerin as your mixing medium (it mixes well will all types).

Like the others have said, though, you need to keep in mind that TD will not make every soap white. It all depends on your ingredients, especially with which FO or EO you choose to use to scent your soap.


IrishLass :)
 

dksoaper

Member
Joined
Dec 6, 2016
Messages
14
Reaction score
0
I did't know that you can make soap white without TD. Please explain. All the soap making videos I've watched the makers have added TD to the batter to make it white. I have only been using olive oil and coconut oil which does not make the soap white. I have only made 2 batches of soap so far and want to move on to a white base and 2 colored swirls. Some TD I have researched is so cheap and some is so expensive. Exp. $4.25 for 1 oz and then some $8.95 for a lb. Then I've seen some that comes in blocks, what does one do with that? Thanks for any light you could shed on this for me.
 

Steve85569

Supporting Member
Joined
Oct 28, 2015
Messages
1,916
Reaction score
2,122
Location
North East Oregon, USA
http://www.ebay.com/itm/1kg-100-Pur...p-FREE-SHIP-/151416524463?hash=item234120ceaf

Is a link to inexpensive water soluable TD. The particle size is small enough with this that you will not suffer from abrasion with it in your soap. Smaller particles is better with TD. TD also have a high affinity for water ( think of it as being thirsty) so when you use it you will want to remember that.

The olive oil you are using will cause your soap to be light green (ish). That's where most of the off white coloring is probably coming from.
Milk will cause some discoloring as will honey. Are you using any additives like that?
Using any type of vanilla will discolor soap brown over time. It's just oxidation and there's no stopping it.

Lard and tallow make a very white soap as does coconut oil. I do not have experience with every oil/fat out there but most of the vegetable oils do not have the olive oil green effect.

Confused yet?
 

dibbles

Supporting Member
Supporting Member
Joined
May 6, 2015
Messages
7,148
Reaction score
8,351
Location
Minnesota
If I want a white soap, I use lard, coconut oil, regular olive oil (not extra virgin), and a light colored oil - usually high oleic sunflower or sweet almond. I rarely use TD. The soap isn't pure snow white - but white enough.
 

DeeAnna

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2013
Messages
13,569
Reaction score
19,715
Location
USA
What the others are saying is what works for me. My current recipe is lard, coconut, and high oleic sunflower. It makes a white soap without TD. Not a cold/bluish white or a chalky white, but a translucent ivory white. Very nice, at least for me.

Here's an example. The green comes from French green clay plus a dab of chromium oxide green. The coral pink color comes from pink clay. The main white portion is just the plain soap -- no TD or other white colorant added.

DSC_0140 500.jpg
 

lenarenee

Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2014
Messages
3,746
Reaction score
3,405
I used to get a nice white (but not stark white like store bought) soap without td; used lots of lard, coconut, castor and whatever high oleic oil I had on hand. Then I found Big Lots coconut oil - 12 bucks per gallon which is a great price for a hobbyist. It's food grade, but more yellow than the coconut oil I used to use so no more white soap. I have to use td now.

I love Brambleberry's white soluble td best - never need to heat the water, just plop some td into a cup, add water, swish and good to go.

I now have Nurture's td and I hate it. It's a bear to mix properly. It absolutely has to be mixed for several minutes OR you need a mini mixer, plus it should sit in solution for a few minutes or you'll end up with spots in your soap.
 
Top