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New Law in California

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TheGecko

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I copied this link from Lebermuth Essential Oil Company website.
Doesn't appear to apply to artisan soap makers since they don't use any of those chemicals in soap making. And having done research in the other artisan bath and body products, I don't recognize any of the names. The only one I recognized was Methylene Glycol which is most commonly used in hair straighteners.

I would say from the list that this applies to commercially produced products...which we all know are filled with all kinds of chemical crap. Noting that the law doesn't take effect until 2025.
 

coastmutt

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Hmm.. I don't think many of us are using formaldehyde, mercury, or ammonium sulfates in our soap making. Like TheGecko said above, this bill doesn't take effect until 2025 and really seems to be pointed towards the more corporate side of cosmetics industries.
 

AliOop

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Some of the banned ingredients are phthalates, parabens and surfactants. According to EWG's SkinDeep database, diethylhexyl phthalate is used in sunscreens, as well as moisturizers and lip balms with SPF in them. Many fragrance oils contain phthalates, as well, although I don't know if the phthalates in FOs are the same as any of the banned items.

If you use any surfactants or pre-made bases to make scrubs, lotions, lip balms, conditioners, syndet bars, etc., you need to check those ingredient lists carefully and frequently, because formulations do change.

California can be rather arbitrary about enforcing certain laws in certain situations. For makers who sell to anyone in California, that could require phthalate-free FOs in all body-care products (if the phthalates listed are actually used in FOs, which I don't know at this point).

Because this law only applies to "cosmetic products," actual soap would not come under this law. To qualify for the soap exception, the seller must avoid making any claims that would elevate the soap from "just soap" into a cosmetic product. Another good reason to learn the labeling laws well before thinking about selling!

You do have until 2025, fortunately, to comply with all of this.
 
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Daisy

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Some of the banned ingredients are phthalates, parabens and surfactants. According to EWG's SkinDeep database, diethylhexyl phthalate is used in sunscreens, as well as moisturizers and lip balms with SPF in them. Many fragrance oils contain phthalates, as well, although I don't know if the phthalates in FOs are the same as any of the banned items.

If you use any surfactants or pre-made bases to make scrubs, lotions, lip balms, conditioners, syndet bars, etc., you need to check those ingredient lists carefully and frequently, because formulations do change.

California can be rather arbitrary about enforcing certain laws in certain situations. For makers who sell to anyone in California, that will require phthalate-free FOs in all body-care products. Because this law only applies to "cosmetic products," the exception would be actual soap... and that requires avoiding any claims that would elevate your soap to a cosmetic product. Another good reason to learn the labeling laws well before thinking about selling!

You do have until 2025, fortunately, to comply with all of this.
@AliOop
Thank you!
No education is ever wasted! It might seem invaluable now but down the line it might become pertinent!
 

paradisi

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"Diethylphthalate (DEP), used as a solvent and fixative in fragrances."

"According to FDA's latest survey of cosmetics, conducted in 2010, however, DBP and DMP are now used rarely. DEP [diethylphthalate] is the only phthalate still commonly used in cosmetics."


 

Lauren Higginbottom

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"Diethylphthalate (DEP), used as a solvent and fixative in fragrances."

"According to FDA's latest survey of cosmetics, conducted in 2010, however, DBP and DMP are now used rarely. DEP [diethylphthalate] is the only phthalate still commonly used in cosmetics."



I guess this is a reason why CandleScience is switching their formulas over to phthalate-free ones. I'm starting to see more suppliers list "phthalates: NO" on their descriptions, but I wish more would follow suit...
 
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