Natural alcohol based deodorant, but is bitterant unnatural?

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DeeAnna

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If you use non-denatured grain alcohol in your products and want to sell said products, you'll need to make sure you don't run afoul of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. I don't know their rules and regs at all, but I do know historically they've been very particular and stringent about controlling the sale of non-denatured grain alcohol.

And that solubilizer mentioned earlier - sodium sunflowerseedate - sounds like the INCI name for soap made from sunflower oil. Soap is an emulsifier, and some types of soap can apparently function as solubilizers. That's cool to know -- it's nice to learn something new everyday. :)

A solubilizer is a type of emulsifier that causes the oil in an emulsion to break down into unusually small droplets -- just few molecules per "droplet". These tiny droplets are so small that light can pass through the emulsion and the mixture appears transparent. A normal emulsion is usually opaque because the droplets of oil in the water phase are much larger -- too large to let light pass through. Not every emulsifier is a solubilizer.
 
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Zany_in_CO

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When I want to create a new product I first search for a DIY recipe. In this case I would google "DIY Spray Deodorant". Or I would search for a commercial product that fits the bill and study the ingredient list to see if it conforms to my standards of what I'm shooting for. Once I find it, I tweak it to meet my all natural protocol. You'll be amazed how natural you can get by simply removing any chemicals, detergents and syndets out of the ingredient list.

This, of course, takes time and effort. No one can do that for you. We can point you in the right direction but it's to your benefit to do the research yourself. Then, use the Recipe Feedback Forum to get input for each batch you try before you try it. You have lots to learn and that's a good place to pick up TIPS.

Make as many small batches as you can, as often as you can, will have you up and running fairly soon if you put the time and effort into it. To save money on essential oils It's best to avoid adding fragrance until you have a solid recipe (or 2 or 3) that delivers every time you make it.
 

Sanman98

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Does adding a solubilizer and preservative to Everclear equate to denaturing it in the effect/regard to being inedible?
I just saw both your posts, so I'm editing. I'll get a gallon of SDA 40-B and research recipes and feedback/tips. Get familiar little by little. Sounds great, guys. Maybe I'll see where else sells it.

I'm thinking I still want a decent percentage of alcohol so it evaporates and doesn't get drippy. But the cost increases.
If I experiment for another year or so I can experience what all works and lasts. Labeling and other technicalities and consistency is the main struggle. It's kinda easy to whip up some decent stuff for friends and family.

Also consider perfumed water mists and lotions, but poorer shelf life. Have to check margins and demand. Also might be harder competition with Bath & Body Works. Maybe try some synthetics and fragrance oils.
Natural high end perfumes can be hard to project "sillage" and also longevity on the skin. But they're so amazing.
Synthetics can add some interesting properties. But I think selling cheaper products will be easier to start.

Edit:
Here's a good info list on denaturing (by US gov I think)
It lists lavender oil
 
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Zany_in_CO

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@DeeAnna Welll said. :thumbs: ;) Thank you for helping me get this thread back on track.
Thank You.gif
 

Zany_in_CO

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Does adding a solubilizer and preservative to Everclear equate to denaturing it in the effect/regard to being inedible?
If you use non-denatured grain alcohol in your products and want to sell said products, you'll need to make sure you don't run afoul of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. I don't know their rules and regs at all, but I do know historically they've been very particular and stringent about controlling the sale of non-denatured grain alcohol.
@DeeAnna is correct. Do the research -- Federal regulations governing the use of Everclear are are available online. But it varies between States and Local regulations as well, so, unfortunately, you need to check those too.

When I was first getting into alcohol sprays many moons ago, Eveclear wasn't even available in some states and other states had 150 Proof Everclear but not 190 Proof. I don't know if that's still true today.

I look forward to seeing what you come up with. :)
 

TheGecko

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If you're concerned about the addition of chemicals, there are "so-called" natural preservatives on the market. You'll need to do the research. Of the ones I tried years ago they had issues like smelling "off" about 6 months down the road.
That's because they are breaking down...which is, pardon the pun...natural.

I grew up on a farm and we canned all sorts of stuff every year. Properly done, you could push stuff MAYBE up to two years, but not after that, absolutely not. It's why we always wrote the dates on the lids or labels and used FIFO (first in, first out).

On the other hand, commercially canned goods with their chemical preservatives, depending on the item and containers (plastic being the worst), can have a shelf life of two to five years.

I have two moisturizing creams that I use all the time...one is a 'natural' face cream, the other is commercial foot cream. When I purchase the face cream, I only purchase what I will use in about three to four months because it will start to break down at around five months...that is just the nature of...nature. The commercial foot cream I bought as a three pack a year ago...I just opened the last pot and it's no different than the first pot; but even with chemicals, it will eventually break down.

That is the downside of 'natural/organic'...it doesn't last very long.
 

TheGecko

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But the cost increases.
"Natural" is not cheap, you have only to look at the cost of Essentials Oils vs Fragrance Oils.

I have a friend who does 'natural skin care'...she used to make this wonderful Cucumber Melon Whipped Body Cream, it was to die for. It wasn't cheap to make to begin with because of the cost of the distillations, and she could only sell it during the colder months because it broke down so fast in the heat. She finally discontinued it.
 

Zany_in_CO

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@TheGecko Are we having fun yet? 😂

@Sanman98 To save time and money, I'd first make a 100ml (3.5 oz) sample of the DIY recipe Post #2 in a 4 oz. spray bottle to see if I like using a spray deodorant. Also to see how effective the essential oil or blend is.

TIP: Using 100ml is easy to convert to percents, i.e., 100ml = 100%. Once you have the %s you can then upscale to as large a batch as you want. ;)
 

justjacqui

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SD40 Denatured Alcohol is accepted by stores like Whole Foods for their "natural" body care products so I don't think you would have much issue getting it into a "natural" store.

Using denatured alcohol will keep you out of trouble with the ATF. Depending on how much you use you may need a permit with the Tax & Trade bureau also. (Perfumer's Alcohol)

Deodorants come under Category 2 of the IFRA standards. I would caution against using tea tree at more than 1% as it can be irritating to some people and even has a "May cause skin sensitization" warning on the SDS. I also find the smell very medicinal.

Although high levels of alcohol will help with solubility of your essential oils it may cause the product to become a Flammable Liquid (Dangerous Goods) which will mean potential issues for transporting and selling.

Also high levels of alcohol may not work with added mineral salts and cause separation - you will need to experiment to work out the correct ratio that works for you. Personally I would not like a shake before use label on my product so I would try to achieve a homogeneous solution.

Also be careful what claims you make about killing bacteria as you need to make sure you aren't making any drug claims.

Hope this helps! Happy formulating :)
 

Sanman98

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Wow great awesome
A bit intimidating

If anyone can offer a good online course, I'm willing to buy a few classes
I had some bookmarked but may have lost it

I found this on the Mountain Rose website

And by search engine

Oh and one of the websites you linked in this thread
 
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justjacqui

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If you are making a deodorant you are making a cosmetic (not a herbal medicine) so I would look for courses aimed at making cosmetics.

The Institute of Personal Care Science has a lot of free information on their website (as well as paid courses). which might be useful.


:)
 
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