My procedure for salting out

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sfnelson67

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I followed the steps in this process and was absolutely amazed at the results. I love soaping but oils can be expensive to just toss when something goes wrong. I can't justify junking something I put money and time in on making. To me the accomplishment of using this method and the results are every bit as rewarding as making the soap itself. This is one of those priceless instructionals that I am thankful was posted. Thank you bakmthiscl for sharing your knowledge.

This process I also found was basically the process used in making Savon de Marseille, which I have been fascinated by.
 

bakmthiscl

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Graceyworks,

Well, judging from my latest batch of soap, your idea is nothing short of wonderful. Okay, this latest batch of grease MIGHT have been slightly cleaner than the usual waste grease I collect from roasts, but it wasn't a night-or-day difference. The grease, as usual, was a medium to dark amber when melted, and contained specs of stuff, which I filter out. Maybe I normally have a dark amber grease, but not all that much different.

Anyway, the resulting soap is several shades lighter than my usual batch -- like pale almond color, not yellow at all -- and I'm very happy with it.

To achieve this miracle (IIRC), I boiled up the grease with water then set the covered pot out in the snow to congeal. Draining off the water from under the solid grease eliminated the really ucky water soluble crud. Normally, I'd have repeated this two or three times to continue to eliminate the non-fat (proteins, I think) and colored materials, but this time I added water and enough (water softener) salt to saturate the water, and boiled that up, with stirring, before I set it out to congeal. (Soap making is a wintertime activity for me!) Well! The result was wonderful -- the grease was very light in color, and the soap came out about the same color

Now it's hard to describe colors without a color reference chart, and those don't work over the Internet because different monitors are likely to display them differently. So I'll attempt to compare the color to common (USA) household colors to give an idea what I am looking at. I find that my 30-year-old "almond" colored kitchen stove is slightly paler than this soap, but also of a different hue -- less yellow. My several "light almond" light switch plates are almost identical in color to the stove. (Note that the soap is darker and more yellow than "ivory" switch plates.) I find a high degree of color consistency in "manila" file folders, and this color almost exactly matches the color of my soap. Note that "manila" envelopes are a good deal browner than my soap, so "manila" is not a sufficient description. By comparison, my previous soaps (from cooking oil, not from that awful stinky grease I reported on previously) are a distinctly browner shade, almost the same as "manila" envelopes.

That's the best I can do over this medium and I hope it conveys the improvement this technique provided. Of course, this is not a scientific test. I "should" have used a water-rendering procedure side-by-side on the same grease I used the brine-rendering procedure and determined the difference, but I didn't.

I also want to emphasize that this batch did not employ salting out of the soap itself. Using brine IS salting out, but this was done on the grease, not on the soap, so the grease itself was unaffected -- only the semi-water-soluble components, which were drawn into the brine by the vastly increased ionic activity. Accordingly, there is NO reason to use distilled water or soft water in this technique -- the calcium and magnesium in hard water probably have no effect on the procedure.
 
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Maggie Moon

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I would think it should also work for cleaning up used oils BEFORE making the soap, to help remove the impurities and cooking odors, to lessen or eliminate the need for the extensive salting-out process.
I’m revisiting a love of cold process soap making after more two decades, and happened across this WONDERFUL website. In my absence, soap making has advanced light years, or at least the number of folks doing it has AND the resources available.

To the point of this thread, I bought some Pomace olive oil a few years ago, intending to start soaping again then. It didn’t happen, and a gallon of this oil has sat, unopened since. This morning, I “cleaned” 64 oz. (vol.) into 64 oz. tap water with 1-1/2 cups Kosher salt and 1-1/2 cups table salt with iodine. The mixture is cooling down now, and obviously separating. There is NO odor.

I’m going to use it this evening as part of a test batch of sap, and will report back.
 

Relle

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I’m revisiting a love of cold process soap making after more two decades, and happened across this WONDERFUL website. In my absence, soap making has advanced light years, or at least the number of folks doing it has AND the resources available.

To the point of this thread, I bought some Pomace olive oil a few years ago, intending to start soaping again then. It didn’t happen, and a gallon of this oil has sat, unopened since. This morning, I “cleaned” 64 oz. (vol.) into 64 oz. tap water with 1-1/2 cups Kosher salt and 1-1/2 cups table salt with iodine. The mixture is cooling down now, and obviously separating. There is NO odor.

I’m going to use it this evening as part of a test batch of sap, and will report back.
Maggie the person you quoted and replying to hasn't been here for two years. This thread is from 2014, so is 5yrs old. Please don't bring up old threads as most of people are no longer here. If you would like to start a new thread and link to this old one, that would be better. The date of threads are on them.
 

Maggie Moon

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Maggie the person you quoted and replying to hasn't been here for two years. This thread is from 2014, so is 5yrs old. Please don't bring up old threads as most of people are no longer here. If you would like to start a new thread and link to this old one, that would be better. The date of threads are on them.
I’m SO sorry!! I didn’t realize.. (I’m new to a lot of things, obviously. )
 

MickeyRat

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Being a relatively new hobbyist soap maker, I have about 30 bars that I scented badly. I've thought about salting them out but, really I don't have much use for what I would get out of it. I have a high efficiency washer so it probably wouldn't work for laundry soap. However, I'm wondering if I added some coffee grounds would it make a good hand soap for the garage? Is there a time when it would be appropriate to add something like that? If so, any advice on how much coffee grounds?
 

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