Moisturizing

SoapMakingForum

Help Support SoapMakingForum:

Lee242

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 12, 2015
Messages
173
Reaction score
32
How can I make this more [FONT=&quot]moisturizing bath soap?

[/FONT]5% super fat
Goats Milk
CO 16.29%
Lard 45.63%
Canola 14.15%
Sunflower oil 10.89%
OO 13.04%
OOPS on % to start
 
Last edited:

DeeAnna

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2013
Messages
13,469
Reaction score
19,369
Location
USA
I agree with The Gent -- the fat percentages need to add up to 100%.

Also ... soap cleans, it doesn't moisturize. You can make soap that is as mild and gentle as possible, certainly. But if you want a product to effectively moisturize the skin, a leave-on lotion is your best option.
 

Susie

Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 1, 2013
Messages
9,713
Reaction score
9,214
Location
Texas
^What they said!

Plus you can use more SF (to a point, then it just becomes greasy residue on your skin and tub), less cleansing oils, and more conditioning oils. Lard is deceptive, however, as it is really conditioning despite the numbers on SoapCalc.
 

kumudini

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2015
Messages
824
Reaction score
404
You can up the superfat, use some butters or avocado oil, refrain from using artificial fragrances (you will need to if your skin is anything like mine), whatever you do, you can only make a soap that is not drying to skin but not something that is moisturising. Especially if everything else like the dry weather, hot air from furnaces in the winter, pollution, your own sensitivities so on and so forth is drying to your skin, a non drying soap is just not enough. I love body butters for my own skin in the winter.
 

IrishLass

Staff member
Admin
Moderator
Joined
Feb 11, 2008
Messages
17,282
Reaction score
11,089
Location
Right here, silly!
Can you explain more about what don't you like about your soap from this recipe? I ask because the cleansing % looks to be on the low side and the conditioning % is pretty high, plus the conditioning percentage is made up of 15% linoleic acid, which many say feels quite nice in soap.

As the others have said, soap doesn't moisturize, but you can certainly tweak it to be less cleansing for sure. One of the ways to do that is to lower the highest cleansing oil in your formula, which happens to be coconut. If you do that, though, you'll want to keep in mind that your lather will decrease, because coconut oil also happens to be the oil that contributes the most to bubbly lather in your formula. Soap formulating can be quite a balancing act! LOL

Or, you can keep things how they are and just increase the superfat a few notches. I personally wouldn't go higher than an 8% superfat in your formula, but that's just me.


IrishLass :)
 

SplendorSoaps

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 1, 2014
Messages
396
Reaction score
266
Location
Pacific Northwest
If you're looking to sub out some oils that add a little bit more conditioning, I would take a look at avocado or sweet almond at 5-10% or so.
 

Lee242

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 12, 2015
Messages
173
Reaction score
32
My wife tried this soap and said it is drying and went back to liquid off the shelf body wash.
 

JayJay

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 3, 2015
Messages
421
Reaction score
221
How long has the soap been curing? Sometimes it is less drying after an extra week or two of curing.

Also, sometimes people's skin needs to adjust. If she is used to body wash that uses a lot of silicones and such, she may need a couple of weeks of handmade soap before her skin balances out and she becomes accustomed to how skin feels without the extra gunk on it.
 

Arimara

Supporting Member
Joined
Sep 29, 2015
Messages
3,434
Reaction score
2,545
How long has the soap been curing? Sometimes it is less drying after an extra week or two of curing.

Also, sometimes people's skin needs to adjust. If she is used to body wash that uses a lot of silicones and such, she may need a couple of weeks of handmade soap before her skin balances out and she becomes accustomed to how skin feels without the extra gunk on it.
I agree here. Many of the soaps you buy at Target can be some of the most drying of things and the lotions/creams aren't much better. Granted I can't make a lotion or a cream yet, I do whip shea butter with a few other oils and I prefer than to store bought moisturizers any day.
 

Rowan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2014
Messages
833
Reaction score
522
Location
UK
IMHO I prefer a much longer cure than 5 weeks. I find all soaps drying until at least 3 months. They tend to get milder as they age. It is a personal preference though. My favourite soaps are over a year old, they are just divine on my skin!

If your recipe is fine, I would say to set some soap aside and test how it feels after a longer cure.
 

Lee242

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 12, 2015
Messages
173
Reaction score
32
This is the start of my soap making so a long cure time. I have a hard time waiting.
I have made 2 soaps and just had to get into them.
Kinda like a kid in a candy store.
 

JayJay

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 3, 2015
Messages
421
Reaction score
221
This is the start of my soap making so a long cure time. I have a hard time waiting.
I have made 2 soaps and just had to get into them.
Kinda like a kid in a candy store.
I TOTALLY understand this! :smile:

Sometimes I try my soaps before they are even finished curing, just because I cannot wait! No judgment here.

But after several folks on here suggested that I cure longer for soaps like high CO oil soaps, I started going back to old batches that seemed too drying after 5/6 weeks. I have noticed that they seem different after 3 months than they do after 5 weeks.
 

Seawolfe

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2014
Messages
3,272
Reaction score
2,998
Location
So Cal
If you want to make it more mild, I would lower the cleansing a bit and up the lard.
One of my favorites is 65% Lard, 15% coconut and 20 % almond oil (you could sub avocado or olive) with 5% superfat.

If you want even less cleansing, make that Ginnys shampoo bar, its a lovely gentle facial soap too.
 

mymy

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 14, 2015
Messages
255
Reaction score
35
IMHO I prefer a much longer cure than 5 weeks. I find all soaps drying until at least 3 months. They tend to get milder as they age. It is a personal preference though. My favourite soaps are over a year old, they are just divine on my skin!

If your recipe is fine, I would say to set some soap aside and test how it feels after a longer cure.
Just in case, let's say I'm making soap with an oil that is going to expire within couple of months, so the soap is considered expired after the date too?
 

Lee242

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 12, 2015
Messages
173
Reaction score
32
My oil is new cause I'm new to this. But anything I get I'm going to mark the expired or use by date on it and the soap.
Thanks
 

DeeAnna

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2013
Messages
13,469
Reaction score
19,369
Location
USA
I think you are inventing a solution to a problem that may not be a problem. If a fat has a "use by" date, it's based on standards for eating the fat, not for making soap. Also, use-by dates are conservative, so it's very likely a fat will be just fine long past the use-by date, especially if you take good care of your fats -- store in a cool dark place, for example. On top of that, saponified fat (soap) has a longer shelf life than the fat from which it was made. You will know soap (or a fat) is not good by unpleasant changes in appearance and a rancid or "off" smell -- if it ever goes bad at all.
 

Dana89

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2014
Messages
289
Reaction score
245
IME after tinkering with many recipes and oils, my favorite conditioning bar has 10% Avocado oil. I really think it is more conditioning that S.Almond oil. Also for most of my recipes I find a 7% superfat to work best for me and my tub.
However what my skin likes and what yours does can be completely different. I do think upping the SF is a great place to start, just not too high in a milk soap.
 
Top