Mixing Waxes

Soapmaking Forum

Help Support Soapmaking Forum:

Joined
Oct 20, 2019
Messages
519
Reaction score
1,478
Location
Seattle. WA USA
I'm primarily a soap maker but I've been making candles for a few select customers. I also do gift baskets with soap, lotion bars, and candles with the same fragrances. I've been using Soy wax because hey it works for me. However I'm getting bees and while I know they will need some time to ramp up I'd like to make candles using some of the bees wax but since I won't have enough hives to fully support a candle business I was wondering if I can mix the soy and beeswax to make the candles and if there is anything I should watch for in mixing the waxes?
 

SavonP

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 26, 2021
Messages
52
Reaction score
69
Location
Uk
Beeswax can be challenging for container candles because if that’s what you’re doing. It also doesn’t have great hot throw. Fir melts many people mix beeswax with coconut oil which is great.
 

lyschelw

SPONSOR
Joined
Feb 22, 2018
Messages
185
Reaction score
106
Location
Wisconsin
Hi there! You have a lot going on! Call me impressed. Oh to be young :)
Yes, you can mix beeswax with many other products. And as others have said you do need to be careful not to use too much. Beeswax is a natural "vybar" and can aid in scent throw if you don't use much. And I mean very little. Like at the most 1oz per pound.

Beeswax will harden the wax and if you use too much can cause it to crack and pull away from the sides.

Also, as you probably already know, beeswax can also make things harder to wick. You may end up needing bigger wicks.

Hope this helps a little :)
 

Christa10

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 23, 2022
Messages
100
Reaction score
125
Location
Fullerton, CA
I recently went to a candle supply place and asked several questions. I'm making a container candle, so they said to use 80% coconut wax (not oil), 19% soy wax and only 1% beeswax. Does anyone have any thoughts about these ratios? I have not used this ratio before and seemed surprised by the recommendation.
 

lyschelw

SPONSOR
Joined
Feb 22, 2018
Messages
185
Reaction score
106
Location
Wisconsin
I recently went to a candle supply place and asked several questions. I'm making a container candle, so they said to use 80% coconut wax (not oil), 19% soy wax and only 1% beeswax. Does anyone have any thoughts about these ratios? I have not used this ratio before and seemed surprised by the recommendation.
So, for my understanding coconut wax is hydrogenated coconut oil. So, 92F coconut oil that is hydrogenated would be considered coconut wax. There are all different recipes for coconut wax blends. I have been told by wax manufacturing companies that only 5-10% coconut 92 (wax) is needed. I have experimented with 1, 5, 10, 20, 30, 50, 80, 90 and 95% coconut 92. I did not add beeswax. I didn't like the results.....
 

VRDubb02

New Member
Joined
Oct 2, 2022
Messages
4
Reaction score
1
Location
NJ
I have mixed soy, palm and beeswax in my melts.
Is that a blend you have been using for awhile? What are your impressions and if you don't mind me asking what is your ratio of that per lb? I am just getting my feet wet into wax, starting with melts and would love to start with a great base. I purchased 2lbs of BW921 but would definitely venture into mixing to get a blend that will be hard for melts but also give great HT.
 

VRDubb02

New Member
Joined
Oct 2, 2022
Messages
4
Reaction score
1
Location
NJ
Could you guys recommend a good pouring pitcher that wont drip all over the place and one that retains heat. I used a stainless steel one I found on Amazon which the pour was great but as I was pouring it was setting along the walls as if it did not retain much heat...or is this a common issue? It was my first pour ever so maybe that is how it goes, Melted to 195, added the oils around 170 and the temp started dropping so I ended up pouring around 165...thoughts and suggestions?
 

Christa10

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 23, 2022
Messages
100
Reaction score
125
Location
Fullerton, CA
So, for my understanding coconut wax is hydrogenated coconut oil. So, 92F coconut oil that is hydrogenated would be considered coconut wax. There are all different recipes for coconut wax blends. I have been told by wax manufacturing companies that only 5-10% coconut 92 (wax) is needed. I have experimented with 1, 5, 10, 20, 30, 50, 80, 90 and 95% coconut 92. I did not add beeswax. I didn't like the results.....
Thanks for the info. That was a pretty thorough test, from 1 - 95% without liking any of it. Darn!
 

Christa10

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 23, 2022
Messages
100
Reaction score
125
Location
Fullerton, CA
Hi there! You have a lot going on! Call me impressed. Oh to be young :)
Yes, you can mix beeswax with many other products. And as others have said you do need to be careful not to use too much. Beeswax is a natural "vybar" and can aid in scent throw if you don't use much. And I mean very little. Like at the most 1oz per pound.

Beeswax will harden the wax and if you use too much can cause it to crack and pull away from the sides.

Also, as you probably already know, beeswax can also make things harder to wick. You may end up needing bigger wicks.

Hope this helps a little :)
so 1 oz of beeswax in a 16 oz amount works out to be about 6%. I can mix that with soy wax 464 yes? I could just use straight soy wax but since I have beeswax and coconut wax I was hoping I could mix them all and get a nice candle, but maybe that won't work so well.
 

Latest posts

Top