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TeresaT

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When I went into my bedroom to change out of my work clothes, I was apalled to find this on my bed. I thought it was dead, until it moved when I photographed it. So, I am now nursing what appears to be a box turtle back to health because my dog decided to use it as a chew toy -- hence the name Kong. However, since I am not a herpetologist, I really don't know what the poor little thing is. I've got it in a container with Timothy hay, a small dish of water, a couple of grape tomatoes (cut up) and some broccoli florets. I'm going to call the Tennessee Aquarium tomorrow to see what they have to say about turtle rescue. I hope the poor little thing survives. I have no idea how to take care of it though.:?:

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not_ally

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Cutie! Not sure if he would survive my doggies' attentions, if he were lose, though ...

How do you know if a Kong is an um, Kong or Kongette ?:)
 

jules92207

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So strange, my in-laws just rescued one from a dog too. They are keeping him/her in a container with water, lettuce, broccoli, etc till they figure out how to care for it.
 

TeresaT

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Cutie! Not sure if he would survive my doggies' attentions, if he were lose, though ...

How do you know if a Kong is an um, Kong or Kongette ?:)
I was shocked that he was alive! But Shredder is only a 20 pound dog, so that helped, I'm sure. The damage to the shell is pretty bad. I have no idea if it's a boy or girl. I'm hoping the Aquarium herpetologist can give me advice on figuring that out and figuring out the age. They are slow growers, so I'm thinking it's at least ten years old; but, I really have no clue. The spots on the shell are similar to the rings on a tree trunk. I just don't remember much more than that.
 

cmzaha

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Do you have a SPCA or similar, they should be able to help out. I am sure it will need some medical attention with the shell damage. Hope he or she makes it through the night after the stress to it. Poor baby, I would put a blankie over the crate/container you have him in and put him in a quite room. Any reptile becomes extremely stressed with injuries such as this and it looks like he might be bleeding pretty bad and that is not good. Do you have a local zoo that might have someone on staff you can talk to. The little guy really needs immediate attention and I realize it is late. Also be very careful because they can inflict some very nasty bites. It looks like it may be a box turtle. Good luck and I hope he/she makes it. Does not look good, sorry to say.
 

galaxyMLP

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Sometimes you can contact emergency night time veterinarians (24 hr). See if they can take care of the turtle for free since he is not your pet. Sometimes they will do that. I live close to a university that has an emergency animal hospital and even though they are not a small animal hospital they work closely with one.

Maybe they can at least keep it alive for tonight and send it to the right people when the business day begins tomorrow?
 

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We have 2 vet clinics in town that take injured wildlife brought in by our game & fish dept. I had to take one of my kitties in a couple of weeks ago and game & fish brought in a turkey vulture (really ugly) and a great horned owl (really cute). You might be able to contact your local game & fish dept and ask them where you can take him/her. Poor little thing!
 

cmzaha

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Did you get help for the turtle this morning or did it not make it through the night?
 
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TeresaT

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Yes! He's a feisty bugger. I did some research online last night before I went to bed about habitat, etc. this morning I put some water in the sink and cleaned him up. He seemed to enjoy the swim. My vet got me in touch with a reptile specialist (who happens to be the reptile vet for the Tenneessee Aquarium. So he must know what he's doing.) I signed the abandonment papers and he is now in the capable hands of professionals. The vet was at the Aquarium, but the tech that took care of the turtle said he looked pretty good and when the vet saw him, they'd let me know how he was doing. Once they get him healed and strong enough to release back into the wild, they'll call me so I can come and get him. They like to release the rehabbed animals back where they were found. My yard is 1.6 acres and only a small bit of it is fenced in for the dogs. I'm going to reinforce the fence so nothing can climb under it before I release the turtle. I've always checked the fence and reinforced/patched so my girls can't get out. It never occurred to me to reinforce so nothing could get in! I have a wonderful briar patch that I refuse to cut down or otherwise destroy because it is home to lots of critters, including box turtles. I'll put it in there when he's ready to be returned to the wild. I feel so much better now that I know he's in professional hands and has the best chance possible for a good recovery. It must have been painful.
 

TeresaT

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We have 2 vet clinics in town that take injured wildlife brought in by our game & fish dept. I had to take one of my kitties in a couple of weeks ago and game & fish brought in a turkey vulture (really ugly) and a great horned owl (really cute). You might be able to contact your local game & fish dept and ask them where you can take him/her. Poor little thing!
We have one emergency vet hospital here in Chattanooga. Several years ago, a friend found a young raccoon that had been attacked by something and was severely injured. He took it there because they were the only place open and he was willing to pay the bill until the wildlife services could get it. Their response was, "We don't handle wildlife. You can check with Auburn or Knoxville." (Both cities have large universities with veterinary schools.) Granted, that WAS ten or more years ago and I've had to use them for my pets since then, but I've never had confidence in them and their prices are outrageous. (If you're wondering, he took it home and kept it warm, but it died sometime during the night. Shock, I guess. How difficult would it have been to euthanize the damned thing or give it some pain meds and fluids?)
 

dixiedragon

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We have one emergency vet hospital here in Chattanooga. Several years ago, a friend found a young raccoon that had been attacked by something and was severely injured. He took it there because they were the only place open and he was willing to pay the bill until the wildlife services could get it. Their response was, "We don't handle wildlife. You can check with Auburn or Knoxville." (Both cities have large universities with veterinary schools.) Granted, that WAS ten or more years ago and I've had to use them for my pets since then, but I've never had confidence in them and their prices are outrageous. (If you're wondering, he took it home and kept it warm, but it died sometime during the night. Shock, I guess. How difficult would it have been to euthanize the damned thing or give it some pain meds and fluids?)
In their defense - raccoons are carriers for a number of diseases, including Parvo. Parvo virus can survive on concrete for 2 years. I worked at a wildlife rescue, and in one summer they lost 4 litters of raccoons, because the first litter had Parvo and they were unable to get the enclosure clean. This was after liberally scrubbing the enclosure with bleach. There aren't many disease that, for example, a bird or a turtle can pass on to a dog or cat, but there are a LOT of disease that will travel from raccoons to cats and dogs.
 

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Did you check the dog's teeth to be sure the blood was not from broken/missing teeth?
 

lenarenee

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Susie....that's great thinking to check the dog. Animals can hide pain so well.

Teresa, thank you thank you thank you thank you for caring for the little guy!!!!!

When I lived in Maryland we had wildlife rehabilitators (certified). I had to take a few birds and bunnies to them because my kitty was a great hunter, and cat bites will kill them simply from infection.

Do other states have rehabilitators?
 

dixiedragon

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I live in Alabama and we do. I actually worked for one for a while. You have to have a special federal license for certain species, such as birds of prey (hawks, eagles, owls). We have Auburn University, which is on of the top vet schools in the country. If you recall the Olympic Opening Ceremonies in Utah, the golden eagle that flew over the stadium was Auburn's mascot, War Eagle VI. You can contact your state's conservation department and they may be able to help you.
 

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You might check with more rural vets or very urban vets. Our currently rural vet (some cats, mostly livestock and dogs) will stabilize wildlife and assist with getting the critter to the appropriate wildlife rehabilitation center. I used to live in-town and my vet there handled exotics like turtles and snakes. Only the suburban vets I've previously had seemed unwilling to help with injured wildlife.
 

cmzaha

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Emergency vet hospitals need to be controlled on their prices, they are outrages. I had to take my cat once and when they were done with the estimate they were going to charge $3000 and I told them they were nuts and just treat the vomiting my cat was experiencing. Was told it might not help but I told them it was my choice. Was given some medicine charged $150 and the cat is alive 10 yrs later. Emergency Vet hospitals are great rip off artists...Which is why I mentioned a zoo. Glad to hear he is in good hands and I am sure he/she will live a good life. More than once I had to take an iguana and a Chameleon to a Herp Veterinarian and they are very specialized vets. It would amaze me how they could run an IV in a Chameleon that was dehydrated
 

TeresaT

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In their defense - raccoons are carriers for a number of diseases, including Parvo. Parvo virus can survive on concrete for 2 years. I worked at a wildlife rescue, and in one summer they lost 4 litters of raccoons, because the first litter had Parvo and they were unable to get the enclosure clean. This was after liberally scrubbing the enclosure with bleach. There aren't many disease that, for example, a bird or a turtle can pass on to a dog or cat, but there are a LOT of disease that will travel from raccoons to cats and dogs.
You learn something new every day. I did not know that.
 

TeresaT

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I just called the vet's office. Kong is still alive and doing well. He's on antibiotics and improving. He's eating for them. I'll call them back in a couple of weeks to see if the flap is healing well enough for him to be released back into the wild. If it isn't, then I'll see if I can start the paperwork to get authorization from the State of Tennessee to keep native wildlife.
 

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That's great news! Thanks for the update; you're willingness to find good care for him saved his life.
 
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