Meadowfoam

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LisaAnne

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After reading all the wonderful things about Meadowfoam I ordered some and have it now. What I'm wondering is tonight I'm figuring out a facial soap for me (older dry skin) and I can not find much information on Meadowfoam, not even a comedogenic rating. Does anyone have experience with it for a superfat in a HP facial soap and possibly a HP shampoo bar?
 

IrishLass

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Right here, silly!
I love meadowfoam. I've never used it in any of my bar-type soaps, but I do use it as a superfat in my creamy cocoa/shea glycerin liquid soap which I use exclusively for hand-washing only, and I also use it in my body butter, lotions and lip balms.

I have never had any success in finding out its comedogenic rating either, but for what it's worth, it's never caused me any breakouts.


IrishLass :)
 

shunt2011

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I too love meadowfoam oil. I haven't used it in soap due to the cost. However, I do use it in body butter, lotion bars and in scrub sometimes. It's a wonderful oil but I prefer to use it in leave on products.
 

LisaAnne

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Thanks, I think I will make a bar and see how it goes. I'm looking forward to using it in butters and lotion bars.
 

lsg

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I too save very expensive oils for leave-on products.
 

LisaAnne

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I too save very expensive oils for leave-on products.
I usually do also, but I have all these supplies and I'd like a super luxury facial bar.

I made the mistake of trying recipes off the Internet (not this site) for facial butters and such. Completely clogged all my pores. Finally have it cleared up, but am looking for some quality products to make for myself.
 

Arimara

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Maybe you should consider babassu oil for your face. I find it strangely gentle as a cleansing oil.
 

DeeAnna

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If you do use meadowfoam in soap (I haven't although I like using it in lotions and salves), you might want to keep it at a modest % of the total fats until you know how it behaves in soap. Reason why I say this is the sap value is on the low side of the normal range for most soaping fats. If I don't have any other info to go on, a low sap value is a hint to me that the fat may add extra softness to the recipe. Maybe someone with experience can share their thoughts, however -- experience would be the best proof one way or the other.
 

HoneyLady

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Check Susan Barclay out at her Swift Crafty Monkey lotion making blog. She has a long list of comedogenicity info there on various oils.

Haven't made soap with it, but I use it straight one night per week on my face before bedtime. Works great for me, and I have sensitive skin prone to break outs.

~HL~
 

LisaAnne

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Maybe you should consider babassu oil for your face. I find it strangely gentle as a cleansing oil.
Another oil to try, have to order that one next. Thanks
 
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LisaAnne

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Check Susan Barclay out at her Swift Crafty Monkey lotion making blog. She has a long list of comedogenicity info there on various oils.

Haven't made soap with it, but I use it straight one night per week on my face before bedtime. Works great for me, and I have sensitive skin prone to break outs.

~HL~
Love her site, she hasn't used it much herself from what I've read. Straight on face,good to know, thanks.
 

LisaAnne

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If you do use meadowfoam in soap (I haven't although I like using it in lotions and salves), you might want to keep it at a modest % of the total fats until you know how it behaves in soap. Reason why I say this is the sap value is on the low side of the normal range for most soaping fats. If I don't have any other info to go on, a low sap value is a hint to me that the fat may add extra softness to the recipe. Maybe someone with experience can share their thoughts, however -- experience would be the best proof one way or the other.
Thanks, good to know, I didn't know a low sap could contribute to a softer bar. Another piece of the puzzle :)
 

DeeAnna

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"...I didn't know a low sap could contribute to a softer bar...."

It doesn't necessarily make a softer bar -- it's just a signal to be cautious until you know how the new fat is going to behave. People don't usually complain about a slightly harder bar of soap than their norm, but most will complain about their soap if it's too soft. :)

To give a couple of extreme examples -- If you look at the sap values for jojoba and beeswax, you'll see they both have very low sap values. Neither of them in pure form make an acceptable soap, but a 100% beeswax "soap" is about as hard as unsaponified beeswax. Beeswax adds hardness if used in a small % in a regular soap recipe. A 100% jojoba "soap" is mushy soft (nasty even!) and it tends to add softness if used in a modest % in a regular soap recipe.
 

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