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IrishLass

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Right here, silly!
I was looking at a pitcher today just like that - it was Rubbermaid as well but it didn't have a number on the bottom.
They can be hard to see sometimes. The recycle code on mine is very near the edge:

IMG_5463RecycleCodeRubbermade640.JPG



IrishLass :)
 
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Update: I finally tried masterbatching today. Made a really dumb error, which was not realizing that my scale only goes up to 5000g. So I was part-way through adding the lye to the water when the scale threw an error code.

My container had 3200g of water in it. For sure I added two full lye containers (907 grams each), as well as one that was probably ¼ full, but definitely not over ⅓ full. That's another 300g of lye at most, for a total of approximately 2100g lye at the highest, maybe less.

Since I am not a math person, I want to be sure that I'm correctly guestimating that the water:lye ratio of this batch is approximately 1.5 to 1. Is that correct? If so, that will actually work pretty well for me since I typically do anywhere from 1.5 to 1.7 for my CP anyway. And then I wouldn't have to do more math to add additional water when making soap. Silver lining 😄
 
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According to my calculations, it's approximately 1.524 to 1. :thumbs:


IrishLass :)
Not sure why I didn’t see this till today @IrishLass - belated thank you! I have been soaping with this master batch, and it’s been great. Going off the 1.5:1 assumes ratio, the lye calculator lets me adjust water as needed without doing more math, so all is well. 😁
 

GooseRidge

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We just started to master batch lye as our production levels increased. However, the first time we used the 50/50 solution, it heated up again upon the addition of the extra water. It only got to 125F, but if I were to have been adding non-frozen milk, it would have scalded. We mixed the master (only about 32oz total) and set it outside (35F) to cool for a couple hours before it was used. I don't recall taking the temp of the master before using it, but it was pretty viscous, which indicated to me that it was around or below 60F prior to the addition of additional water. Anyone have any ideas as to why this secondary exothermic reaction may have happened?? I can't find stories of similar experiences anywhere!
 
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We just started to master batch lye as our production levels increased. However, the first time we used the 50/50 solution, it heated up again upon the addition of the extra water. It only got to 125F, but if I were to have been adding non-frozen milk, it would have scalded. We mixed the master (only about 32oz total) and set it outside (35F) to cool for a couple hours before it was used. I don't recall taking the temp of the master before using it, but it was pretty viscous, which indicated to me that it was around or below 60F prior to the addition of additional water. Anyone have any ideas as to why this secondary exothermic reaction may have happened?? I can't find stories of similar experiences anywhere!
Yes, my master batch heats up a bit if I add more liquid. I believe that's pretty common.

My understanding is that you should not let your MB solution get below 65º F, or the lye will start to precipitate out of solution. That may be another cause for the exothermic reaction, as the now-undissolved lye was reacting with the added water, as well.
 
A

amd

Anyone have any ideas as to why this secondary exothermic reaction may have happened?? I can't find stories of similar experiences anywhere!
I think this is commonly mentioned on the forum that adding additional liquids to a 50/50 masterbatch will cause the solution to warm up. You may find this article of interest: Masterbatching | Soapy Stuff

However, the first time we used the 50/50 solution, it heated up again upon the addition of the extra water. It only got to 125F, but if I were to have been adding non-frozen milk, it would have scalded.
In this case you would not add your milk to the lye solution, there is no reason to do so when using masterbatched lye. You would add your milk to the oils [I like to stickblend for a few seconds to let the oils and milk get a head start on emulsifying together], and then add your 50/50 masterbatch to the oil/milk mixture. This eliminates milk scorching. In 3 years of doing my milk soaps this way, I haven't scorched any soaps.
 

earlene

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We just started to master batch lye as our production levels increased. However, the first time we used the 50/50 solution, it heated up again upon the addition of the extra water. It only got to 125F, but if I were to have been adding non-frozen milk, it would have scalded. We mixed the master (only about 32oz total) and set it outside (35F) to cool for a couple hours before it was used. I don't recall taking the temp of the master before using it, but it was pretty viscous, which indicated to me that it was around or below 60F prior to the addition of additional water. Anyone have any ideas as to why this secondary exothermic reaction may have happened?? I can't find stories of similar experiences anywhere!

The secondary exothermic reaction is normal. You may not have found it, but I can assure you it is mentioned here several times in various threads as well as other places on the internet where discussions about adding liquids to a cooled lye solution occur.

My 50% MB lye is somewhat viscous normally, and it tends to remain at about 67°F most of the time. I shake the bottle well prior to pouring to weigh for soapmaking, just to ensure it is well mixed. In my experience, the slightly viscosity does not cause any problems when I make soap.

You should avoid storing your MB lye at temperatures below 60°. If left at low temperatures for too long, when the lye precipitates out of solution, it will form a solid plate of lye crystals at the bottom of & in the shape of your vessel. (Link) If you need to cool your lye solution, it is better to create a cool water bath, and sit your securely closed vessel in the bath to slowly cool off your lye solution.
 
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I master batch my lye also - I use a 50/50 lye water solution. The other portion of water that I use, I add sugar, salt, citric acid and additional lye (to account for the citric) and it really heats up a lot! The citric and lye together really cause an exothermic reaction - now I have started using an ice bath.
 

violets2217

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I'll need to have a neighbor save me a laundry detergent bottle! I got my 10 pounds of lye in yesterday evening and want to start master batching!!! I wonder if something like this HDPE container would hold up, especially the spigot?
HDPE CONTAINER.jpg
 
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I'll need to have a neighbor save me a laundry detergent bottle! I got my 10 pounds of lye in yesterday evening and want to start master batching!!! I wonder if something like this HDPE container would hold up, especially the spigot?
View attachment 51713
That container looks okay. Usually an HDPE container is fine, but check the bottom, does it have a #5 imprinted?
 

violets2217

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Are you afraid it’s going to leak?
LOL! Yes! I'm just imagining the lye gnawing away at the spigot and causing a disaster. I've been making soap for about 2 years now and all the sudden the salesmen at Ace hardware has scared the crap out of me the last time I picked up lye. Obviously he's never seen me mixing lye in my gear... but he just haunts me with his "I'd hate to see you loose and eye" comment!
 
A

amd

I was going to order it. But honestly I'm more concerned about the spigot than the container.
If you're concerned about the spigot, I would buy a container that would allow you to tip it upright (so that the spigot is at the top) when not in use. That would limit the exposure of the spigot to the lye solution to only when you are actively dispensing the solution.
 

DeeAnna

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...I wonder if something like this HDPE container would hold up, especially the spigot?

I would use that container only if the spigot could be turned upright during storage. I would not assume the seals that keep the spigot from leaking and the spigot parts themselves are lye safe if this container is being sold by a normal consumer products retailer.

It's another story if this container is being sold by a chemical supply house that certifies the materials of the spigot and its seals are resistant to concentrated alkali.

But even if the spigot is alkali safe, I still wouldn't store it with liquid against the spigot. There's no way to lock the spigot handle in place so it stays positively in the closed position and that's a real hazard. One inadvertent bump against the handle of the spigot, and you could have highly concentrated lye solution dripping all over.
 
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I have to agree that I'd pass on the spigot. You might find that buying a full container of unscented liquid laundry detergent is cheaper, or at least not much more expensive than buying a good HDPE container with a drip-free spout. I did that, and decanted the detergent into another container. I rarely use store-bought detergent, so it will take me awhile to use it up. But it was worth it to get a nice MB lye container. Oh, the things we do for soap...
 

GooseRidge

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I think this is commonly mentioned on the forum that adding additional liquids to a 50/50 masterbatch will cause the solution to warm up. You may find this article of interest: Masterbatching | Soapy Stuff


In this case you would not add your milk to the lye solution, there is no reason to do so when using masterbatched lye. You would add your milk to the oils [I like to stickblend for a few seconds to let the oils and milk get a head start on emulsifying together], and then add your 50/50 masterbatch to the oil/milk mixture. This eliminates milk scorching. In 3 years of doing my milk soaps this way, I haven't scorched any soaps.
AH!! Thank you!! Up till now, we have just done all the extra steps of freezing everything and sprinkling to lye on top of that. Trying to figure out a way to cut down on our time as our production increases. But I also don’t want scorched milk! Thank you so much for the advice!
 

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