Making your own colorants?

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Anyone ever tried making their own natural colorants using things like blueberry juice, etc.? Just curious as I wanted to go as natural as possible.:!::!:
 
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Ohhh

TYSM! I searched but I probably missed it. Thanks again =) I have HORRIBLY sensitive skin so I know others do as well. So, I figured natural colorants might work better for me (and others). My question is about the micas and stuff. Are they "natural"?
 

100%Natural

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TYSM! I searched but I probably missed it. Thanks again =) I have HORRIBLY sensitive skin so I know others do as well. So, I figured natural colorants might work better for me (and others). My question is about the micas and stuff. Are they "natural"?

For the mostpart Micas and Oxides are now reproduced in a lab. In order to find out if they are infact natural, you need to contact the supplier and ask where and how they source their colourants. I don't use any of them so I can't help you any further with that end of things. My personal choice was to not use them due to them being chemical recreations.

Even natural colourants can cause irritation so be careful! Just because it's natural doesn't mean it's good for you!
 

Moody Glenn

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Hi! There are different ways to color your soap with various natural ingredients. A couple ideas comes to mind such as using clay products (sold by various soap and candle companies). Clay can give your soap more earthy tones. Another great example of using natural materials is Calendula flower petals. Calandulas are annual plants. They are easy to grow - even right now. The petals, dried or fresh, can be infused in various oils. This infusion colors the oils to a bright yellow or light orange. Personally, I have not done this type of coloring - even though I have bags of dried petals. I should try it. The dried petals can also be found in various companies. As for fruit juices, I am not sure. Lye has a way to "kill" colors or change them into unsuitable shades of gray.

Please expect that natural materials will give you more muted, earthy colors. Don't expect bright, vibrant, neon colors. Although I have seen Calandula soap being bright yellow. Hope this is of some help for you!
 

three_little_fishes

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I have used paprika to produce a beautiful orange color. I did a crockpot infusion in the oil instead of adding the paprika at trace so the soap wouldn't be scratchy. Annatto (sp) seeds, woad, calendula, and many more can be used to produce various colors.
 

DeeAnna

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Paprika, cocoa, turmeric, and, yes, calendula are examples of spices and herbs that give attractive colors to lye soap. You aren't going to get super bright colors from herb and spice colorants -- they tend to be softer and more earthy looking. I understand clear purples and bright, true blue and red are tough as well, although I cannot speak from experience.

As far as the perennial issue of what is "natural" ... this issue comes up a lot on this forum. IMO, "natural" is a buzzword that means something different to every person. You will need to decide where your own personal boundary lies between "natural" and "not natural" and make your own decisions.

Even the simplest unscented soap you could make is not "natural" in that it is a chemical process that almost never spontaneously occurs without the intentional actions of humans. But obviously most people on this forum are willing to make an exception for soap, so obviously soap for most of us lies on the more "natural" side. But there are some who won't even use soap to clean their skin, and for them, soap is not "natural".

Micas are minerals mined from the earth and refined by humans. They sometimes have extra synthetic colorants added. Are micas natural or not? Some say they are natural; others say no. Spices and herbs are plant parts that are dried and otherwise processed by humans. Are they natural or not? Most people would say they are natural -- or at least more natural than micas. But some herbs and spices may irritate your sensitive skin and some micas might not. So "natural" is not necessarily better. Bottom line -- plan to test your ingredients and develop a list of what works for you within your definition of what is "natural" and acceptable to you.

Good ways to search this forum: http://www.soapmakingforum.com/f11/how-search-soapmakingforum-like-pro-34885/
 
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Natural

Thanks, Natural to me (as far as coloring) are things that come from the earth, have no extras like red dye #5 etc. I'm not against these as they make BEAUTIFUL colors but my skin hates them :( So, if I don't want lots of hives I have to be VERY careful what I use.
 
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