Make Your Own Naturally Balanced Shampoo Bars

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Beth Ann

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I have bought 3 ebooks from SwiftCraftyMonkey, AKA:Susan Barclay. They are excellent. I also am a patreon on her site. She knows what she’s talking about & her prices are reasonable. I’ve been making her shampoo bars for at least 5 years and I love them.
What are the ingredients in her shampoo bars? Im looking for minimal ingredients but not just a fancy soap!
 

KiwiMoose

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I have both recipes and love both. When I have the pressed bars at the market, they sell very quickly. I have one customer who buys 3-4 at a time. Currently, I'm using the hot pour recipe and my hair loves it! I only need a bit of light conditioning on the ends in order to comb through my wet hair. There are several options in the recipe for different hair types; I use the Sunflower Shampoo for normal to dry hair.

If your scalp is itchy using the pressed bars, it's likely because of the CAPB. You can sub it out for something like Foaming Silk, Foaming Apple, or Foaming Oat, different surfactants. That has made a big difference for several people, including my husband. I now have one bar that I call my Winter Scalp bar that uses Foaming Silk and additives like nettle and white willow bark extracts as well as EO's good for hair and scalp (tea tree and rosemary).

First pic is the pressed DIY shampoo bars. Second is the Hot Pourable, scented with Sandalwood FO.

View attachment 63702 View attachment 63703
Ditto. I don't use any CAPB in mine as it is a known irritant. I also had problems with SLSA until I took it down to not more than 5% of my recipe ( it made my head very itchy). I use foaming apple at circa 10%.
 

nframe

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[QUOTE="Misschief, post: 926414, member: 19626"
If your scalp is itchy using the pressed bars, it's likely because of the CAPB. You can sub it out for something like Foaming Silk, Foaming Apple, or Foaming Oat, different surfactants. That has made a big difference for several people, including my husband. I now have one bar that I call my Winter Scalp bar that uses Foaming Silk and additives like nettle and white willow bark extracts as well as EO's good for hair and scalp (tea tree and rosemary).

[/QUOTE]
Thank you for that. I never thought the irritation could be due to the CAPB. I looked on the web for Foaming apple, foaming silk etc. and cannot find them (I live in the UK). I have at home a surfactant called Plantapon. The website says : A 'green' liquid surfactant blend (Lauryl glucoside and Sodium lauryl glucose carboxylate) which can be used, typically at 10% in water as a 'principal surfactant' to make up a base for shower gel, body wash etc. Do you think that would be suitable?
 

Misschief

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I'll confess that I'm no expert when it comes to surfactants. You may need to to do some digging on the Swift Crafty Monkey site. My feeling is that you cannot swap them.
 

Megan

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[QUOTE="Misschief, post: 926414, member: 19626"
If your scalp is itchy using the pressed bars, it's likely because of the CAPB. You can sub it out for something like Foaming Silk, Foaming Apple, or Foaming Oat, different surfactants. That has made a big difference for several people, including my husband. I now have one bar that I call my Winter Scalp bar that uses Foaming Silk and additives like nettle and white willow bark extracts as well as EO's good for hair and scalp (tea tree and rosemary).
Thank you for that. I never thought the irritation could be due to the CAPB. I looked on the web for Foaming apple, foaming silk etc. and cannot find them (I live in the UK). I have at home a surfactant called Plantapon. The website says : A 'green' liquid surfactant blend (Lauryl glucoside and Sodium lauryl glucose carboxylate) which can be used, typically at 10% in water as a 'principal surfactant' to make up a base for shower gel, body wash etc. Do you think that would be suitable?
[/QUOTE]
I'd test it. I've seen bar recipes that include Alkyl polyglucosides (the most common one I've seen being Decyl glucoside which has a quick but relatively unstable foam). Lauryl glucoside has an excellent foam profile. The sodium lauryl glucose carboxylate is also an Alkyl polyglucoside and from what I've read (in the last two minutes) adds more mildness and conditioning but both components are fairly mild.

Edit: I see the hot pour recipe actually uses decyl glucoside so the Plantapon would be a good drop-in. You might be able to sub it for the betaine as well. The advantage to using the CAPB is that it is amphoteric, but if you were replacing with any of the foaming oat/foaming apple, that's just more anionic so you wouldn't have the amphoteric in there anyway. Having the amphoteric in there is sometimes important for the foam level/stability but isn't always necessary.

Sorry, last edit: it shouldn't be an issue because the plantapon's pH is 5-6 ish range but you still should always pH test your shampoo bars.
 
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AliOop

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What are the ingredients in her shampoo bars? Im looking for minimal ingredients but not just a fancy soap!
If you go to Etsy and look up the recipes she has for sale, she lists all of the required ingredients for each recipe in the Description. You have to click to expand that section (it's on the right side for me), and scroll way down till you find it. It's a nice feature since you can see what is needed before buying the recipe.
 

nframe

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I'd test it. I've seen bar recipes that include Alkyl polyglucosides (the most common one I've seen being Decyl glucoside which has a quick but relatively unstable foam). Lauryl glucoside has an excellent foam profile. The sodium lauryl glucose carboxylate is also an Alkyl polyglucoside and from what I've read (in the last two minutes) adds more mildness and conditioning but both components are fairly mild.

Edit: I see the hot pour recipe actually uses decyl glucoside so the Plantapon would be a good drop-in. You might be able to sub it for the betaine as well. The advantage to using the CAPB is that it is amphoteric, but if you were replacing with any of the foaming oat/foaming apple, that's just more anionic so you wouldn't have the amphoteric in there anyway. Having the amphoteric in there is sometimes important for the foam level/stability but isn't always necessary.

Sorry, last edit: it shouldn't be an issue because the plantapon's pH is 5-6 ish range but you still should always pH test your shampoo bars.
[/QUOTE]
Thank you. I'll try the Plantapon next time. Your knowledge of surfactants is amazing! I get confused with all these terms - amphoteric, anionic, etc. They don't mean a lot to me.
 

Megan

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Here is a good resource explaining how differently charged surfactants are used in different formulations: An Easy Guide to Understanding How Surfactants Work | IPC

Basically, in formulations, you use differently charged surfactants (anionic, nonionic, amphoteric) to clean different soils or to provide different characteristics (most importantly in shampoo: foam and mildness). Most of the soils in your hair are oily soils, so we primarily use anionic surfactants (SCI, sulfates) because they work the best to clean these types of soil. Using cosurfactants helps to stabilize the formula (more important in water based products) and build foam, affects viscosity (important in water based products as well), and helps to make the shampoo milder.
 

nframe

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Here is a good resource explaining how differently charged surfactants are used in different formulations: An Easy Guide to Understanding How Surfactants Work | IPC

Basically, in formulations, you use differently charged surfactants (anionic, nonionic, amphoteric) to clean different soils or to provide different characteristics (most importantly in shampoo: foam and mildness). Most of the soils in your hair are oily soils, so we primarily use anionic surfactants (SCI, sulfates) because they work the best to clean these types of soil. Using cosurfactants helps to stabilize the formula (more important in water based products) and build foam, affects viscosity (important in water based products as well), and helps to make the shampoo milder.
Thank you. That was really informative,
 

SirSoapsAlot

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I'd test it. I've seen bar recipes that include Alkyl polyglucosides (the most common one I've seen being Decyl glucoside which has a quick but relatively unstable foam). Lauryl glucoside has an excellent foam profile. The sodium lauryl glucose carboxylate is also an Alkyl polyglucoside and from what I've read (in the last two minutes) adds more mildness and conditioning but both components are fairly mild.
From the research I had saved, Decyl glucoside does have a stable foam. I believe I got this info from Formula Botanica when I was looking up natural surfactants.
1642209836195.png
1642209846661.png
 

SavonP

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[QUOTE="Misschief, post: 926414, member: 19626"
If your scalp is itchy using the pressed bars, it's likely because of the CAPB. You can sub it out for something like Foaming Silk, Foaming Apple, or Foaming Oat, different surfactants. That has made a big difference for several people, including my husband. I now have one bar that I call my Winter Scalp bar that uses Foaming Silk and additives like nettle and white willow bark extracts as well as EO's good for hair and scalp (tea tree and rosemary).
Thank you for that. I never thought the irritation could be due to the CAPB. I looked on the web for Foaming apple, foaming silk etc. and cannot find them (I live in the UK). I have at home a surfactant called Plantapon. The website says : A 'green' liquid surfactant blend (Lauryl glucoside and Sodium lauryl glucose carboxylate) which can be used, typically at 10% in water as a 'principal surfactant' to make up a base for shower gel, body wash etc. Do you think that would be suitable?
[/QUOTE]
What is CAPB please!
 

Megan

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From the research I had saved, Decyl glucoside does have a stable foam. I believe I got this info from Formula Botanica when I was looking up natural surfactants.View attachment 63760vView attachment 63761
Sorry, I misspoke, less stable (not unstable) when compared with like coco and lauryl glucoside...at least according to this supplier: https://www.ipcol.com/blog/an-easy-guide-to-understanding-surfactants/
I think the differences among the top three in the picture are minute enough to not really make that big of a difference in a shampoo bar...which is why I think they can substitute the plantapon for e.g. decyl glucoside without seeing many/any negative effects on the showy-ness of the bar.
 
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