M&P getting better hydration and lather?

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Soapsavvy

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Is Goat's milk melt and pour bases the most hydrating of the melt and pour soaps?
Does adding sugar to melt & pour bases to create more lather?
 

lsg

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I don't think adding sugar to already made bases will make more lather. If you want more lather than you might try a high sudsing M&P base or add a little dissolved Sodium Lauryl Sulfoacetate to the base.
 

Soapsavvy

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Hi ISG, can you tell me how much of the SLSA I would need to add to 1 Lb. of Melt & Pour soap base. Also would adding this require that I decrease any additional things I may want to add, like fragrance or a essential oil?
 

lsg

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I would try 1 teaspoon dissolved in a little hot water. I think that you can add the normal amount of FO or EO. If I were you, I would try a very small batch first to see how it turned out before using it in a full pound of M&P.
 

tinatolle

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I would avoid using SLS and just know that homemade soap won't sud like the rest, but it is much better for you.

I got this from an article I was reading about SLS:

Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (SLS), Sodium Laureth Sulfate (SLES), and Ammonium Laurel Sulfate (ALS)

Sodium lauryl sulfate is a surfactant, detergent, and emulsifier used in thousands of cosmetic products, as well as in industrial cleaners. It is present in nearly all shampoos, scalp treatments, hair color and bleaching agents, toothpastes, body washes and cleansers, make-up foundations, liquid hand soaps, laundry detergents, and bath oils/bath salts. Although SLS originates from coconuts, the chemical is anything but natural. The real problem with SLES/SLS is that the manufacturing process (ethoxylation) results in SLES/SLS being contaminated with 1,4 dioxane, a carcinogenic by-product,5 which will be discussed in more detail later.

SLS is the sodium salt of lauryl sulfate, and is classified by the EWG Cosmetics Database as a "denaturant, surfactant cleansing agent, emulsifier and foamer," rated as a "moderate hazard." Similar to sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) is sodium laureth sulfate (short for sodium lauryl ether sulfate, or SLES), a yellow detergent with higher foaming ability.
 

shunt2011

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I would avoid using SLS and just know that homemade soap won't sud like the rest, but it is much better for you.



I got this from an article I was reading about SLS:



Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (SLS), Sodium Laureth Sulfate (SLES), and Ammonium Laurel Sulfate (ALS)



Sodium lauryl sulfate is a surfactant, detergent, and emulsifier used in thousands of cosmetic products, as well as in industrial cleaners. It is present in nearly all shampoos, scalp treatments, hair color and bleaching agents, toothpastes, body washes and cleansers, make-up foundations, liquid hand soaps, laundry detergents, and bath oils/bath salts. Although SLS originates from coconuts, the chemical is anything but natural. The real problem with SLES/SLS is that the manufacturing process (ethoxylation) results in SLES/SLS being contaminated with 1,4 dioxane, a carcinogenic by-product,5 which will be discussed in more detail later.



SLS is the sodium salt of lauryl sulfate, and is classified by the EWG Cosmetics Database as a "denaturant, surfactant cleansing agent, emulsifier and foamer," rated as a "moderate hazard." Similar to sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) is sodium laureth sulfate (short for sodium lauryl ether sulfate, or SLES), a yellow detergent with higher foaming ability.

They aren't talking about SLS. They are suggesting SLSA which is a mild surfactant. sSodium Laurel Sulfoacetate.
 

shunt2011

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They are talking about SLSA. Sodium Laurel Sulfoacetate It is a mild cleanser shown to be much more friendly than those you have listed. It is recommended as a more gentle of all them.
 

tinatolle

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I'm not familiar with that-but thanks for the clarification. I find the SFIC bases have a great ingredient list.
 
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