Liquid soap watery at 1:1 ratio 🤷🏻‍♀️

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StarsRUs

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So I make liquid soap all the time and my standard rule is, soap paste weight must be diluted with hot water, double the weight of the soap paste and if needed I’ll add a bit more water in small quantities if it needs a little more diluting.

Now a few days ago I made liquid shampoo, and I used the same rules, unfortunately my soap got super watery so I had to thicken it with salt. This of course didn’t go so well and my soap got too thick even though for a moment it didn’t seem like it so I added the soap to the bottles, overnight it turned into a big thick substance that wouldn’t move. So I took it all out, diluted it again and thought it was of a good consistency, added it to the bottles again and yep, next day it was super thick again… so I decided to make a whole new batch yesterday and instead of doubling the paste weight in water, I used the same weight of water as the soap paste. The soap paste was 2200 grams so I weighed the water to the same weight, heated it and let it dilute till the next day which is now.

I just checked my soap and it’s again as watery as it was when I used double the amount of water!! I thought I’d be on the safe side when adding much less water so I could dilute it slowly and get it that honey like consistency. I just don’t understand why it’s going wrong 😑 does anyone know what could cause this?

My recipe:
Almond oil 10%
Babassu oil 15%
Castor oil 12,5%
Coconut oil 10%
Jojoba oil 10%
Lard 20%
Tallow 22,5%

Replaced the water lye mixture with ACV and added silk to the hot lye mix.

Added glycerin to the soap paste and water mix. Which I always do with my liquid soaps.

Does anyone know why my liquid soap is so watery? Because I normally with my other soaps always double the soap paste weight in water…. As I’ve seen and read from other soap makers as well…
 

Zany_in_CO

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Does anyone know why my liquid soap is so watery?
It's just the nature of the beast. :oops:
Honestly? It is next to impossible to diagnose and suggest remedies with all you have going on there. There are about as many ways to make LS as there are LS'ers. LOL You would be better off to simplify your recipe and do some research to analyze your method to discover for yourself what the problem may be.
My recipe:
Almond oil 10%
Babassu oil 15%
Castor oil 12,5%
Coconut oil 10%
Jojoba oil 10%
Lard 20%
Tallow 22,5%
Dilution rates vary with the oils used.
With 67.5% hard oils + 32.5% liquid oils I would dilute at 40% soap paste to 60% water.
Sequester for 2 weeks before making any adjustments.

It may be helpful for you to read through this recipe. It results in a lovely LS with the same viscosity as shampoo. You don't need to add the rosin -- just Coconut & Castor (for lather and texture) + Almond Oil (beneficial for hair)

ZANY'S FLAXSEED SHAMPOO
 

StarsRUs

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It's just the nature of the beast. :oops:
Honestly? It is next to impossible to diagnose and suggest remedies with all you have going on there. There are about as many ways to make LS as there are LS'ers. LOL You would be better off to simplify your recipe and do some research to analyze your method to discover for yourself what the problem may be.

Dilution rates vary with the oils used.
With 67.5% hard oils + 32.5% liquid oils I would dilute at 40% soap paste to 60% water.
Sequester for 2 weeks before making any adjustments.

It may be helpful for you to read through this recipe. It results in a lovely LS with the same viscosity as shampoo. You don't need to add the rosin -- just Coconut & Castor (for lather and texture) + Almond Oil (beneficial for hair)

ZANY'S FLAXSEED SHAMPOO
Thank you for your reply. I figured it must have something to do with the oils used. I will try to adjust the ingredients, use less liquid oils, because this problem never happened with my 100% tallow LS.
 

DeeAnna

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You can't apply dilution information for one liquid soap recipe to another. The fatty acid profile makes a big difference in how each soap will behave.

Start from scratch with each recipe -- dilute with caution until you know what works best for that recipe. And bear in mind that each batch of soap made with the same recipe might not behave exactly the same. Even though I might have a rule of thumb for a given recipe, I still add the last bits of water more slowly to each batch of diluted soap so I can compensate for variations from batch to batch.

"...my soap got super watery so I had to thicken it with salt. This of course didn’t go so well ... I decided to make a whole new batch yesterday and instead of doubling the paste weight in water, I used the same weight of water as the soap paste.... I just checked my soap and it’s again as watery as it was when I used double the amount of water!!..."

I gather the first batch of diluted soap had salt as a thickener and the second batch did not? If so, they aren't the same recipe anymore and it's unrealistic to expect the two to behave the same.

Once you add a salt to a liquid soap, the chemistry changes. Even if you use the exact same batch of paste to make a diluted soap with no salt and another second diluted soap with salt, the two portions will still behave differently due to the salt.

Another thing I'll add is this recipe has a relatively low percentage of oleic acid in it -- I normally shoot for around 50% give or take and this recipe is under 30% oleic. I've found that low oleic recipes can be trickier to dilute, although the added stearic and palmtic acids from the lard and tallow might compensate for the low oleic content in this recipe.

Also don't be too fast to thicken with salt ... work on understanding how to dilute this recipe without reaching for a thickener right away. Once you find an optimum way to dilute with water alone, then you might use salt to tweak the viscosity. And experiment with samples, not the whole batch. I might have 10 little cups of soap on my counter when I'm tweaking the dilution and/or playing with a thickener.
 
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