Links for extracting clay and clarifying used oils

Discussion in 'Soap Making Recipes & Tutorials' started by wardbond, Feb 8, 2018.

Help Support Soapmaking Forum by donating:

  1. Feb 8, 2018 #1

    wardbond

    wardbond

    wardbond

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2017
    Messages:
    77
    Likes Received:
    115
    Here is a quick tutorial about clay and how to extract it from "mud"
    Processing Clay the Easy Way - Practical Primitive. http://www.practicalprimitive.com/skillofthemonth/processingclay.html

    I also sterilized by boiling it after, as I was putting it in soap... You strain out the layers and collect the finest silt & clay layers after it settles.then let it dry out to a powder.
    Alternatively to steralize, add it to the lye mixture rather than at trace.

    This book also outlines multiple methods for "clarification" of used oils using alum salt or sodium salt and acid (vinegar, lemon, citric) to treat the oil then precipitate the solids
    Merilyn Mohr The Art of Soap Making

    [​IMG]

    https://www.amazon.ca/dp/092065603X/?tag=skimlinks_replacement-20

    Another method more expensive is using Fuller's earth.
    <br /><br />

    I bought some potassium permaganate from my Walmart pharmacy... It is a powerful antioxidant. That is used in fish tanks and around the world to stertilize raw vegetables to eat. To "purify" the canola oil

    Living for my half and half (get it?) The carton was great. The soap fits in your hand.. IMG_1518126085862.jpg <br /><br />Ward
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 24, 2018
    katemz, cherrycoke216 and earlene like this.
  2. Feb 8, 2018 #2

    earlene

    earlene

    earlene

    Grandmother & Soaper Lifetime Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2016
    Messages:
    5,651
    Likes Received:
    5,033
    Location:
    Western Illinois, USA
    I have that book, but don't recall even noticing the reclamation/clarification of cooking oils section. I know it is a fairly accepted practice, though for making soap.

    I never gave clay making a lot of thought other than when watching demonstrations of making clay bricks for buildings. I've been to a couple of those over the years, but not participated. The kids sure seemed to enjoy it, though.

    But what a great idea for using your local resources.
     
    cherrycoke216 likes this.
  3. Feb 8, 2018 #3

    SaltedFig

    SaltedFig

    SaltedFig

    Lifetime Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2017
    Messages:
    2,226
    Likes Received:
    2,118
    Location:
    Australia
    We have done some local clay extractions here (it is fun and interesting).

    What a great idea to sterilize them for use in soap, and for oil cleaning, thanks Wardbond!

    Edited to clarify: The oxidizer is water soluable and is used (in very dilute solution) in some water treatments (it has antibacterial and antifungal properties). Unfortunately it is not at all suitable for adding to oil, and I would strongly suggest that you don't add it to oil.
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2018
    cherrycoke216 likes this.
  4. Feb 9, 2018 #4

    IrishLass

    IrishLass

    IrishLass

    Staff Member Admin

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2008
    Messages:
    15,157
    Likes Received:
    8,993
    Location:
    Right here, silly!
    Wow- no kidding! Out of curiosity (because I'd never heard of potassium permanganate before), I looked it up and came across a video of 3 different ways to start a spontaneous explosive fire without matches just by using potassium permanganate and 1 other ingredient:

    1) By pouring a little vegetable glycerin over the top of some potassium permanganate
    2) By mixing table sugar with potassium permanganate
    3) By pouring brake fluid over some potassium permanganate

    All 3 spontaneously combusted into a violent blaze of fire in less than 10 seconds. Pretty fascinating.....and scary.


    IrishLass :)
     
    SaltedFig and cherrycoke216 like this.
  5. Feb 9, 2018 #5

    SaltedFig

    SaltedFig

    SaltedFig

    Lifetime Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2017
    Messages:
    2,226
    Likes Received:
    2,118
    Location:
    Australia
    It used to be called Condy's Crystals, and back in the 50s, or thereabouts, it was used to dye hair brown (it turns brown in reaction to organic materials).

    Brilliant treatment for fungal infections - a single crystal will be enough to colour a whole bath pink (purple means it's too strong).

    It's vicious enough to permanently stain enamel ... and yeah. Not something to be mixing with anything.
     
    cherrycoke216 likes this.
  6. Feb 9, 2018 #6

    wardbond

    wardbond

    wardbond

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2017
    Messages:
    77
    Likes Received:
    115
    Back to Basics: A Complete Guide to Traditional Skills

    https://books.google.ca/books?id=83...of soap making potassium permanganate&f=false

    Outlines the process as well as in the Harrowsmith Art of soapmaking book

    I prefer to read for content and not react to strongly to surface information...

    Many of the ingredients and by-product s of soap making are dangerous

    For instance. Google glycerine explosives..of you really want to watch something dangerous.

    It is about education....

    I mean look how dangerous sodium hydroxide is......
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2018

Share This Page