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LH batch #3 -- lemon custard (lard, canola, coconut)

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I had just received my mineral pigments so my objective this time was to achieve as near perfect color as was possible for me. The secondary objective was to get as close as possible to a commercial appearance and regularity. Finally, I've tried under-scenting and over-scenting (accidentally) so I wanted to see if I could get the scent EO just right.

To achieve the best color I wanted to start out with as little natural color as possible, so I chose oils that were either clear liquids or white solids. Already familiar with my coconut oil being clear when melted, and being in my lard phase and knowing lard melts clear, I replaced my previous recipe's olive oil with canola oil so that the result would have minimal color. When I reached trace I could see that other than a faint slightly beige tinge it was as near to white as I've seen in my short soaping career. Here's the recipe I used:

lard 53%
canola 23.5%
coconut 23.5%



SoapCalc's numbers:

hardness 42
cleansing 16
condition 51
bubbly lather 16
creamy lather 26
iodine 58
INS 147

If my 2nd batch's hardness 44 (Miller's favorite lard olive coconut) is any indication, this batch's 42 should be fairly hard. After only 3 days the Miller's is surprisingly hard, almost as hard as commercial soap, and I expect more hardening in the next few weeks as the bars dry.

This is my best batch yet, colored perfectly, scented perfectly, nearly uniform (mostly 4 to 4.2 ounces), and nicely shaped. It's the first time I've made a batch without that "if only" feeling! :)

The one durned thing, I had my shea butter melted and ready to go in at trace, but I forgot, possibly because the melted shea in a clear glass dish didn't stand out to me. But no big deal I'll just put some in the next batch. :)

I'm done with my lard phase for the time being and I'm turning to 100% vegetable oils for the foreseeable future. I just wanted some lard samples to use for comparison. The idea of "no dead animals" really appeals to me, particularly when combined with "all natural ingredients" and "no chemicals."

Greg/Lovehound
 

reallyrita

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LL Batch #3

Just had to peek at the forum one last time before shutting down my computer for my trip. Glad I did....these soaps are truly lovely. Obviously you have mastered the PVC!
 
G

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Wow, they look great! I have got to get some pvc. What diameter is it?
 
G

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Thanks for the compliments! I'm glad this isn't a "help" thread! :)

Actually I'm thinking of writing a tutorial after I've done it a few more times, after I've caught any other possible problems.

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Get a 3" diameter 24" long ABS (black) pipe as sold at Home Depot for about $3 or so. Or try the other big box hardware stores because they probably carry it too although I wonder what such a short length is used for in construction. Big short pipes? ;)

Here's the procedure: Cut a piece of 18" wide Reynolds freezer paper to a width of about 11" (inner diameter of the pipe plus a bit of overlap). I rolled up a towel to about 3" diameter and put the paper around it and shoved it in the pipe (the towel pushes the paper against the inner wall of the pipe). It might take a bit of fiddling until you get it right. With the paper sticking out just a bit, put a piece of transparent tape on it at the overlap. Then extract it, flip it over, put it back in and tape the other end. Shake out the towel. The towel is to push the paper next to the wall while you tape it. The tape is to keep the paper from curling up as you're filling the mold with soap batter. Tape the bottom of the paper to the bottom of the pipe so it won't rise up.

Put a piece of plastic wrap over the papered end of the pipe and use a rubber band to hold it in place. (There will be a 6" gap at the top that isn't papered.) Use the lid off of a 3" diameter can and put it over the plastic, then another layer of plastic and another rubber band. Use some strapping tape and run it around the bottom end of the pipe twice, close to the end of the pipe (within 1/2"). Trim off the excess plastic wrap. Finally use two pieces of tape and make an "X" over the bottom end of the pipe, running each piece up high enough to have about 3" of tape on the pipe past where the plastic covers it. This step is important because if you don't provide a strong bottom support your soft soap will try to bulge out when you lift the mold. Now you're ready to pour.

After your soap has gelled and cooled (18-24 hours) take off the tape and plastic to expose the soap. Stack the top end of the pipe with food cans until one sticks out, turn over the pipe putting that can on the floor and push down on the pipe. The soap log should start coming out. If not, get a second person to help push down on the pipe but that probably won't be necessary. Congratulations you now have a nice 3" diameter soap log! :)

WARNING: Be careful to support the cans while you turn the pipe upside down! A can might fall out and hit your foot, injuring it. Might be a good idea to wear shoes. Trust me I know. I once dropped a soup can on my bare big toe and it took me almost a year to recover. I couldn't walk for a full month! That Campbel's soup is a dangerous product!!!

Anyway I'll write it up for a tutorial after a few more round batches, or whenever I get a round tuit. ;)
 

happyday

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Lovehound, next time you're at Lowe's or Home Depot, go back into the area with all the PVC and ABS fittings and find yourself the bin of "test caps." They are thin plastic caps that just fit the end of a plastic pipe and they cost around 60 cents each. Mine don't fit tightly (that would be nice...), but do set into the end closely enough that there's no leakage. You can secure it with just a couple of pieces of scotch tape if you feel the need. I like to cut little round freezer paper liners to go between the test cap and the soap so the cap will just lift off when the soap is done gelling and cooled. Makes a smooth, even end piece on the soap that doesn't bulge like it can sometimes with saran.
 

crazyk

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Lovehound, thats a great looking soap.

I think I'll have a go at the PVC pip thing at some point, they soap's come out so nice and round.

How did you cut them? did you have a fixture?

Cheers
 

digit

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They are beautiful!! :D I immediately thought of lemon chiffon.

I wonder why I always think of foods when I see different soaps? :lol:

Digit
 

country gal

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YEA!!! Soap looks great. Looking uniformly cut too!!!! We had to stop at Lowe's the other night and while my H was getting fixin's for the toilet I am checking out the PVC. He started to ask a question, stopped, smiled and said he would just meet me at the registers!!
I am hoping to give it a try today or tomorrow.
What size batch did you use for your 18". I have just been playing with 2# batches,so I can get a feel for what I am doing. I am also getting ready to play with colors and scents, as soon as I figure what and where to buy!!

Again, great job Greg!!
 
G

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Thanks again for all the compliments! Y'all are so nice! :)

happyday said:
Lovehound, next time you're at Lowe's or Home Depot, go back into the area with all the PVC and ABS fittings and find yourself the bin of "test caps." ...
Y'know I've read that but conveniently forgot it, and when I was doing my second pipe batch I just solved the problem the quickest way I know, improvising with what I've got on hand! :) Now where's that damned round tuit??? ;)

crazyk said:
I think I'll have a go at the PVC pip thing at some point, they soap's come out so nice and round.

How did you cut them? did you have a fixture?
I took a picture just for you K, and remember what I said above about improvising with what I've got on hand? LOLOLOL! :) :) :)



That's a miter box and C clamp with a tin can lid taped to an angle bracket, and my new soap slicer that somehow got purchased at the restaurant supply store.

digit said:
They are beautiful!! :D I immediately thought of lemon chiffon.

I wonder why I always think of foods when I see different soaps? :lol:
Let me tell you it was all I could do to restrain myself from dishing up some of it right after trace! ;) And it smelled and looked exactly like lemon pudding! :)

country gal said:
What size batch did you use for your 18". I have just been playing with 2# batches,so I can get a feel for what I am doing. I am also getting ready to play with colors and scents, as soon as I figure what and where to buy!!
I too have been doing batches around 2# of oil. If you calculate in reverse, a cylinder 3" diameter 18" tall is 127 cubic inches. Using this formula that comes to 51 oz of oil, or about 3# maximum. My 2# produced about a dozen 1" thick bars. Two pounds is a pretty good batch size for newbies since it's not too expensive if you screw it up, and 2# fits into my 2-1/2 qt. steel pan. I've got a big steel stock pot for when I go to bigger batch sizes.
 

SoapyGal

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jadiebugs1 said:
For U, Lovehound!!

BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAH !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Love that!!!!!

I'm going to have some fun with this & my husband :p

Thanks, Jadie!!!
 

cdwinsby

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Lovehound said:
WARNING: Be careful to support the cans while you turn the pipe upside down! A can might fall out and hit your foot, injuring it. Might be a good idea to wear shoes. Trust me I know. I once dropped a soup can on my bare big toe and it took me almost a year to recover. I couldn't walk for a full month! That Campbel's soup is a dangerous product!!!
Try putting an open can in the pipe with the open side up and place a length of thick dowel in it instead of lots of cans. It works great!
 

stepibarra

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OMG... Greg, your soaps look so yummy.... Too bad all this yumminess and ya can't eat it...LOL
 
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SoapyGal said:
Greg, these are lovely!! How are they working out for you?
The soap turned out nice. Lard makes nice soap, the color came out nice, the scenting light but at least noticeable, all in all a successful batch. They're hard too, so they last longer than a soft soap.

cdwinsby said:
Try putting an open can in the pipe with the open side up and place a length of thick dowel in it instead of lots of cans. It works great!
I tried that first. Full cans works better for me.
 
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