Laser Printing on Soap

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paradisi

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It goes to traceability and incident reporting. Most labeling the FDA deals with is able to be saved if the consumer wishes or needs to. Hence the question what the FDA would think.
 

dibbles

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I must be the oddball here, but I really don't like the look of this. I can see using it as a surface design feature of the soap, but I don't care for the 'label' look.
 

Tara_H

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I must be the oddball here, but I really don't like the look of this. I can see using it as a surface design feature of the soap, but I don't care for the 'label' look.
I appreciate the aspect of it which leads to less packaging waste, but I agree that I don't think it adds to the soap itself.

At least it (presumably) would wash off easily...
 

ImpKit

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So the fatal flaw to this type of labeling, for me, is demonstrated on the first bar. I, personally, have to struggle to make out the information at the bottom (the weight and such) because it's printed / engraved in a light color on top of a light colored soap. That makes the soap somewhat inaccessible to people with vision problems I'm thinking. It might not even pass labeling standards if you can't, honestly, read it at like, 12" away. And it would be worse on back labels with tinier fonts for ingredients.

Also, I like the idea of being able to take the label off and appreciate the design of the bar before using it.
 

earlene

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It goes to traceability and incident reporting. Most labeling the FDA deals with is able to be saved if the consumer wishes or needs to. Hence the question what the FDA would think.
Good point. It's hard to contact the seller if you don't eve have the option to save the label, although IF the consumer wanted to they could photograph the 'label' prior to use, but I don't think that's a reasonable justification for not having a printed label.
 

ResolvableOwl

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Encode the contact information into a QR code modelled into the soap bar via soap dough! 🤔

On a serious note, this issue arises in any situation where soaps are sold open/unwrapped. Idk, is it a thing to give away a business card with address and/or ingredients along with the soap? Then every customer could decide by themselves if they want to produce a piece of cardboard waste with each purchase, or not.
 

earlene

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Encode the contact information into a QR code modelled into the soap bar via soap dough! 🤔

On a serious note, this issue arises in any situation where soaps are sold open/unwrapped. Idk, is it a thing to give away a business card with address and/or ingredients along with the soap? Then every customer could decide by themselves if they want to produce a piece of cardboard waste with each purchase, or not.
I believe it depends completely on where it is being sold. In a physical store, where the owner is purchasing wholesale from the maker, handing out a card for every purchase is an unreliable expectation. In a Farmer's Market (Fair, or private booths) type setting or when selling online, where the maker is the seller, of course that would work. But that also depends on the regulations of the country/region where the soap is being sold. If the regs require full specific packaging for certain sizes of products, then handing out a card may not meet those requirements. Example: We (USA) have type-size (for printed labels & ingredients lists) requirements that can be included for small sized products, where an extra page or insert or attachment is allowed for cosmetics or drugs. Not all soaps in the US are deemed cosmetics or drugs, but some are. How many differences are there for other countries? I don't even know, but there are many.
 
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