Large Batches of Goat Milk Soap

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lwf2015

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We are wanting to increase production from 5 lb batches to 10 lb batches. I understand I can mix a lye water solution, but want to keep approx. 1 oz of milk per bar. Has anyone ever had any issues mixing this much lye and goat milk together? We currently freeze our goat milk and mix with the lye and it works great. Just wondering if any issues from the larger batches.
 

Meganmischke

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I wouldn't think the size of the batch would matter. As long as you intend to keep the same lye concentration there should be no difference other than maybe more heat?
 

ewenique

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Try adding room temp goat milk to your oils and stick blending it well before adding your lye water. Works great and doesn't cause such a reaction with the lye.
 

lwf2015

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Liquid

ewenique: The problem I have here is I want to maintain the 1 oz per bar of goat milk. If I use the water with the lye I have to subtract the goat milk.
 

houseofwool

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I am not understanding the concerns. Do you use any water at all, or just frozen milk? I would take your current recipe and double it, running it through a lye calculator just to be safe. If you are worried about the milk getting too hot when you add the lye, you could always put the container in a cold water bath to help keep the temps down.
 

HorseCreek

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I think the concern is in doubling the amounts used there may be more heat, or more trouble dissolving the lye, etc. I can only assume that it really shouldn't be much different. If there is more heat created, as stated, you could just do an ice water bath to keep the temps down more. However, watch out for undissolved lye. I would say just try it and see what happens. Then adjust from there if needed.
 

Susie

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I don't think that there will be that much more heat, and setting the pot/bucket/whatever in a sink of cold water should alleviate that easily. More concerning, for me, would be the saponification heat created in the mold if you are using one mold for a doubled batch. I would think that using separate molds would be a wiser idea so that there is more surface area to dissipate the heat.
 

houseofwool

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I would definitely agree about using multiple molds if trying to avoid gel.

That said, if you are trying to keep the temperature down when adding the lye, it will be beneficial to use a wide container, rather than a tall narrow one. When I scaled up my batches, I found it hard to keep the temps down if there was no way for the heat to dissipate.
 

lwf2015

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I went ahead and just made a double batch. No issues with the lye getting too hot. It dissolved the lye just fine, but after mixing with a drill and squirrel cage it would not come to a trace like normal. It took approx. 3 times longer. Is it possible that my lye was too cold? Sorry I did not check my temps. Making smaller batches I could always tell by the color of milk and lye. By the way this forum is great and you guys are great!
 

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