Lard soap

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MarinaB

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They are both slow to trace which is helpful when you are new in particular but it enables you to do design work without it getting too thick. Be aware there are FO's that can cause acceleration.
There is Sea Moss FO at BB - that is the most acceleration I have ever gotten :(( no time to mess around.
 

SPowers

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There is Sea Moss FO at BB - that is the most acceleration I have ever gotten :(( no time to mess around.
I haven't tried that one but one of the fragrances I used (it was a blend of a few so not sure of the culprit) really accelerated to the point I had to glop it in the mold. Very rustic looking the the peaks are dangerous! :D
 

MarinaB

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I would like to say THANK YOU to a topic starter and all who contributed some input into this subject. Today I made my first CP beef tallow based soap! I just got inspired! Such creamy feeling from that soap.
I put lavender&cedar FO from BB.
Do you have idea when I should cut it? When I made 100% coconut oil based soap, I usually cut it in 5-6 hours after I made it.
 

DeeAnna

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You want to cut soap when it's at the right texture, not by time. If you make the same (or similar) recipe a lot, you'll get a feel for the amount of time it takes to get to the right texture. But when doing a first-time recipe, what works for your other recipes might not work for this one.

I want to cut my soap when it feels firm but still yields slightly to gentle pressure without denting. It will feel like refrigerator-cold mild cheddar cheese or colby cheese. If you have some of this cheese in the refrigerator, you can calibrate your fingers by pressing on the cheese. ;)

I do not want the soap to feel like aged cheddar or Parmesan (too hard, too brittle) and I don't want it to feel like cold cream cheese either (too soft).

A soap high in tallow can become brittle and hard to cut early on -- a lot like a soap high in coconut oil -- so start testing early so you can cut it before it's rock hard. It's been awhile since I made a soap like this, but I'd start checking about 6 hours and see if it's ready. It might be or it might not depending on the other fats in the recipe.

A soap high in lard generally isn't a brittle soap in my experience and is able to be cut over a longer time compared with high tallow and high coconut soaps. My high-lard soaps are often ready to cut at 12-24 hours, but are still pliable enough so they can be cut for several days after they have been made. I sometimes split a normal sized bath bar into half to make samples, and I often make samples like this some days after the original bars have been cut.
 

MarinaB

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DeeAnna, thank you for your really professional input! I could feel, you are a very experienced soapmaker! I am very appreciated your time you put here to explain to me some things.
PS: DeeAnna, I gave up an idea to make a shaving cream bar after your post. Maybe later.
Right now I go to check my soap!

What a surprise! I still can't cut my tallow based soap. Not ready to be cut after 13 hours.
 

DeeAnna

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If the soap doesn't get warm enough to gel, it can stay soft. I've had coconut oil soap that gelled and was hard as a rock after a few hours and other batches of coconut oil soap that didn't gel and stayed like putty for a day or so. It's all situational, and that is why cutting based on time isn't always going to be reliable.
 

MarinaB

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DeeAnna, Oh... I only made mono oil soap before. I used only coconut oil. Why my tallow based soap goes into a gel phase in 6 hours after it was put into a mold? WHY? Is it fine?
What temperature should be for oils and lye solution?
DeeAnna, I have made thousands coconut oil bars, but never my soap was in a mold longer then 6.5 hours.
 

Arimara

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I have used only BB lye calculator. There is no beef tallow in their list of oils.
I will make CP soap--
14.4 oz Beef tallow
2.4 oz Castor oil
3.6 oz Coconut oil
3.6 oz Olive oil

How much do I need water and lye for my soapmaking?
Thank you!
Marina, I played with the numbers until I got your measurements. Looks like 9.1 water / 3.4 lye for a 38% water as portion of oil and 5% superfat.
I'm going to strongly suggest you at least use the water to lye ratio setting for this recipe (2:1 water to lye is a great start for this recipe). As it is, there is a lot of water in it and with the amount of hard oils in it, you may verywell run into otherwise preventable issues with it. @MarinaB I also suggest using the forum's soap calculator or going to soapcalc.net. Both are great soap calculators to start and not as limited as brambleberry's. I have not used WSP's calculator but since it was suggested, give that a whirl too.
 

MarinaB

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Arimara, thank you for your input! I put 9 oz of water and 3.3 lye. So... Tonight I will mix 3.3 oz of lye and 6.6 oz of water. Thank you!
 
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