Labels are haaaarrrddd!

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mandy318

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I didn't think they would be! (Disclaimer: I don't sell --these are for pretty gifts only, I know they don't meet requirements)

I made these with craft paper and Avery clear labels. The label is too tall. I'd like the top to be just below where the straight edge of the soap turns to texturing at the top. But I'm limited to the size labels at my local Staples. Since I don't sell I'm looking to keep costs as low as possible.

The other challenge is cutting the craft paper nice and straight. Its like trying to cut wrapping paper straight.

I have a rotary cutter and mat, I wonder if that might work?

I would love some tips to make this look a little neater and straighter. I can reduce the size of the logo and trip the top of the label itself with no problem (I only printed one sheet to make sure the sizeing was right.

Heeeellllpppp! :) TIA!

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snappyllama

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I like the simplicity of the label!

I would totally fail preschool scissor cutting within the lines if I had to do it today. I use a paper guillotine like this: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003SLAAOO/?tag=skimlinks_replacement-20. I really don't know why I haven't always owned one these... so many wonky cuts I could have avoided over the years.

I have limited patience for fiddling with printers... I actually buy full label sheets and then just cut them out individually. The paper guillotine makes quick work of them.

The other thing I do when wrapping is find the creases for each bar and then crease the paper on a table so I get nice sharp edges.
 
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Seawolfe

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Unless I'm using sticky round labels for round soap or lotions, I like to print on Kraft paper, and cut to suit - sticking with glue sticks. I've gotten ok at cutting with good scissors, but I was just given an old guillotene cutter from work! Just what I was going to ask for for xmas!

+1 to creasing each edge.
 

DeeAnna

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I use a rotary cutter and cutting mat ALL the time for this kind of work. It's great, especially if you also use a clear "quilters rule" that you can also find near the rotary cutter supplies. I have several of the 6 inch wide rulers and two or three of the 2" or 3" wide ones. The wider ones don't move around as easily as the narrower ones, so they are great for long cuts. But the narrower ones are more agile and easier to use for small jobs or more intricate work.

I agree with Seawolfe -- why not print directly on the paper and skip the labels? I use Microsoft word to create a page full of labels. Each label has a faint gray border around its edges. I use the rotary cutter to cut along the border. Works pretty well. The example is for a label that is folded into a "U" shape and covers the front, bottom, and back of a soap bar, but the same general idea can be used for a cigar style label.

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mandy318

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Unless I'm using sticky round labels for round soap or lotions, I like to print on Kraft paper, and cut to suit - sticking with glue sticks. I've gotten ok at cutting with good scissors, but I was just given an old guillotene cutter from work! Just what I was going to ask for for xmas!

+1 to creasing each edge.
Do you cut the craft paper to fit in your printer? I'm cutting from a roll the size of a roll of wrapping paper...
 

cmzaha

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A nice rotary cutter will be a lot less stressing to use. I cannot live without my Rotatrim cutter although they are quite Pricey. I think Fiskars makes a decent rotary cutter. You just do not want the cheapest you can buy.

DeeAnna, I give you credit for using Word to create labels. I cannot design a label in Word even if my life depended on it. I have to use publisher
 

Seawolfe

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Do you cut the craft paper to fit in your printer? I'm cutting from a roll the size of a roll of wrapping paper...
No - I buy a pack of 8.5 x 11 kraft paper for the printer.

My "new" guillotine cutter looks like its from the 1950's - so I WIN!! :)

Carolyn - I use word for my round labels - it lets me just insert my artwork from Gimp. I think I actually used an avery template to make it.
 
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MySoapyHeart

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I like your lable! I also like the name you put on there and the clever way you used the `S` twice. Also I liked that it was simple and easy to read. Although you don`t sell them but give them away, it really will make a good impression for the receiver when the info is there for them to read.

Ps. I LOVE craft paper, it gives such a rustic feel to it. I wrap small gifts in it all the time, and use pretty lace instead of string.
 

DeeAnna

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Another suggestion -- You don't have to fill up the entire adhesive label with your artwork. Use the exact same template you are using right now, but fill less of the space for each adhesive label with your artwork. After printing out a sheet of labels, use a rotary cutter to slice off the blank parts of the adhesive label that you don't want. This will leave you with a label that is smaller in height and/or width. Then apply this downsized label to the cigar band as you have been doing. You now can cut that cigar band narrower too because the smaller label will let you do that. Hope this helps!

ETA: In some cases, I've been able to turn one label into two by basically splitting one adhesive label into two parts after printing. You might be able to do that with your ingredients list, although it's not as likely for your front label.

PS: If you can afford it, get a 45 mm rotary cutter versus a smaller diameter cutter. 45 mm is the most common sized blade, so it can be easier to find replacement blades. The handle is usually more comfortable than the handles for the littler cutters. And a larger blade is less "squirrely" than a smaller blade, so it will help you cut straighter lines. I don't recommend the big 60 mm cutter. Although I have one, I keep going back to the 45 mm. It can be harder to find 60 mm blades. And the blade tends to flex too much if you put a lot of pressure on it. The 45 mm seems to be the best of both worlds for straight-line cutting and general purpose use.

This is my favorite: http://store.cadenceinc.com/Catalog.../partid/079076070065057054053052/Default.aspx because the blade automatically retracts for safety when you let go of the handle.
 
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houseofwool

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Unfortunately, laser ink doesn't stick to the bulk Kraft paper. I've tested this so much.
 

Misschief

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Unfortunately, laser ink doesn't stick to the bulk Kraft paper. I've tested this so much.
That is because laser ink isn't ink... it's toner, a very fine powder which bonds to the paper with the heat of the fuser. Because kraft paper has more texture than copier paper, which is made for laser printers and copiers, the heat of the fuser in a laser printer isn't enough to bond the toner to the paper. We have that same issue with any heavily textured paper. Linen stock is one of the worst; the toner rubs right off.
 
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mandy318

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I'm cutting labels with my rotary cutter today. It's working much better. :)
 

commoncenz

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That is because laser ink isn't ink... it's toner, a very fine powder which bonds to the paper with the heat of the fuser. Because kraft paper has more texture than copier paper, which is made for laser printers and copiers, the heat of the fuser in a laser printer isn't enough to bond the toner to the paper. We have that same issue with any heavily textured paper. Linen stock is one of the worst; the toner rubs right off.
My printer allows me to change the paper type in the preferences. I change mine to "cardstock" when printing labels on Kraft Paper and only have problems with paper that is extremely textured. The "cardstock" setting tells the laser printer's fuser that more heat is required to bond the toner to the paper.
 

Misschief

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My printer allows me to change the paper type in the preferences. I change mine to "cardstock" when printing labels on Kraft Paper and only have problems with paper that is extremely textured. The "cardstock" setting tells the laser printer's fuser that more heat is required to bond the toner to the paper.
I was going to write something about settings but wasn't sure how technical I should get. With our commercial copiers/digital printers, we can set the weight of the stock and the speed that it goes through the machine. The slower it goes, the better the toner sticks. Setting it for thicker stock makes it go through more slowly at a higher temperature.
 

mandy318

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This was a giant pain in the rear. I officially hate labeling.

BUT--thank you all for your suggestions...it made the process that much less sucky!

I ended up using resume paper because I was running out of time and just had to find something that would work. :)

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Serene

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Mandy,

These look fantastic.

Sere
 

DeeAnna

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Nicely done, Mandy! It may have been a pain to do, but you did it right. The result is simple, crisp, and appealing.
 

mandy318

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Thanks for the kind words! In my professional life I'm in marketing..I hope I bring a little of that knowledge to bear in labeling. If even not for sale, just for appeal.

These are going into gift baskets along with some bath bombs I made and some homemade canned goodies my sister made (sweet mustard, jalapeno jelly, and apple butter).
I'm very excited to hand out my gifts!
 
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