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Sandiebrown65

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So I am still pretty new to the craft of soap making. I recently purchased a soap design/pull-through tool and was keen as curry to make pull through designs just like the ones I have seen in videos and on this forum. My first attempt was a bit of a failure, but I learned a few things which helped with my second attempt.
  • You really do need to use squeeze bottles with pipette tips for extensions. Simply thinking that you can pour from a long nosed jug was a foolish assumption.
  • You need to keep each individual pour small and thin to allow the colour from below to be "pulled through"
  • The trick to keeping the batter runny enough is that there is no "trick"! There are a number of things I did to keep the better fluid enough to do this, the main ones that helped me include learning the difference between emulsification and light trace, using the full water amount, only using coconut oil at around 20%, increasing the amount of unsaturated oils slightly, using citrus EO certainly helped keep the batter soft for longer, adding sugar, doing the pour at room temp and finally - be quick. Experience helps a lot with the last point!
One of the biggest things a new soaper wants to know is how to keep the batter from seizing up so you can do all of those lovely swirls we see. Finding this secret was like an elusive holy grail. After a total of 40 batches of soap in my soap making journey I have found that it really does come down to time and experience.

My second attempt was much more successful as I made sure I was totally set up with the right equipment needed, tweaked my recipe and used an EO blend I knew would work. To say I am ecstatic with my second attempt is an understatement.

To all my fellow newbies, don't give up!! Your frustration and patience will pay off.

I have uploaded pics of my first attempt and my second attempt. The orange/black/yellow ones are my first attempt. You can see how the layers were way too thick so the colour barely pulled through and there are no concentric rings that come from the smaller/thinner individual pours.
 

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Lovely! But I still pour mine - partly due to laziness ( more mess to clean up) and partly due to my recipe that I don't think would cope too well with squirty bottles because it tends to be on the thicker side (I need to keep temps a bit higher due to use of soy wax and butters) - I'm also afraid of wasting too much batter ( whatever residue is left inside the bottles/baggies once the pour is done).

*Keen as Mustard!*
 

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Relle

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@KiwiMoose, that's the only mustard I use on ham for sandwiches at Christmas :thumbs:.

@Sandiebrown65, did you purchase your pull through tool here in Oz ? I remember you said you were going to have a go at making one in a 3D printer.
 

Sandiebrown65

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did you purchase your pull through tool here in Oz ? I remember you said you were going to have a go at making one in a 3D printer.
Yes, I actually found some at Aussie Soap Supplies. It would have taken me quite a while to create the design in CAD before I could have printed them anyway. However I will probably still end up designing some, just to add to the assortment that I now have. It will be much easier now that I already have the little threaded rod to attach them to.

*Keen as Mustard!*
Keen as curry, keen as mustard! We tend to use both on this side of the ditch ;)

They are so pretty! You must have had a lot of fun cutting it too.
Do you know how hard it was to wait! I got up at 6am the next morning just to cut it.

Lovely! But I still pour mine - partly due to laziness ( more mess to clean up) and partly due to my recipe that I don't think would cope too well with squirty bottles because it tends to be on the thicker side (I need to keep temps a bit higher due to use of soy wax and butters) - I'm also afraid of wasting too much batter ( whatever residue is left inside the bottles/baggies once the pour is done).
Yes, there was quite a bit of residue left inside the squirty bottles, this resulted in a smaller yield of soap bars. However, I have a plan to overcome this, along with the clumsiness and waste of cutting off the pipette tips (ruining perfectly good pipettes).
Next time I will be using recycled water/softdrink bottles, lined with piping bags. Once the pouring has been done you can pull the piping bag out and snip the corner off and pipe the rest either onto the main batch or into individual soap molds if it is surplus soap.
I designed this tool on my printer and will be testing it out on the weekend, it fits nicely on the tops of the more popular softdrink bottles. Hopefully it is successful.
 

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Carly B

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I also pour mine. I bought some squirt bottles at the restaurant supply store, but it's a whole lot more time to mix and bottle then pour (both in execution and cleanup) than it is to just pour. What I have found is that using a funnel like this works well. The one have fits the top of the circular mold perfectly. I only have to be careful to lift the mold up when the batter reaches the bottom of the funnel, otherwise it just collects like an ITP swirl in the funnel.

Yours looks great, tho. I still haven't mastered getting the right consistency, but it's fun trying....

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So I am still pretty new to the craft of soap making. I recently purchased a soap design/pull-through tool and was keen as curry to make pull through designs just like the ones I have seen in videos and on this forum. My first attempt was a bit of a failure, but I learned a few things which helped with my second attempt.
  • You really do need to use squeeze bottles with pipette tips for extensions. Simply thinking that you can pour from a long nosed jug was a foolish assumption.
  • You need to keep each individual pour small and thin to allow the colour from below to be "pulled through"
  • The trick to keeping the batter runny enough is that there is no "trick"! There are a number of things I did to keep the better fluid enough to do this, the main ones that helped me include learning the difference between emulsification and light trace, using the full water amount, only using coconut oil at around 20%, increasing the amount of unsaturated oils slightly, using citrus EO certainly helped keep the batter soft for longer, adding sugar, doing the pour at room temp and finally - be quick. Experience helps a lot with the last point!
One of the biggest things a new soaper wants to know is how to keep the batter from seizing up so you can do all of those lovely swirls we see. Finding this secret was like an elusive holy grail. After a total of 40 batches of soap in my soap making journey I have found that it really does come down to time and experience.

My second attempt was much more successful as I made sure I was totally set up with the right equipment needed, tweaked my recipe and used an EO blend I knew would work. To say I am ecstatic with my second attempt is an understatement.

To all my fellow newbies, don't give up!! Your frustration and patience will pay off.

I have uploaded pics of my first attempt and my second attempt. The orange/black/yellow ones are my first attempt. You can see how the layers were way too thick so the colour barely pulled through and there are no concentric rings that come from the smaller/thinner individual pours.
Way to go! Thanks for all the tips. I bought a cylindrical mold with a pull-through tool a while ago but haven’t used it yet. Your tips will help me to get started (and I guess I will have to buy some squeeze bottlers with extension tips)
 

Sandiebrown65

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Way to go! Thanks for all the tips. I bought a cylindrical mold with a pull-through tool a while ago but haven’t used it yet. Your tips will help me to get started (and I guess I will have to buy some squeeze bottlers with extension tips)
The extension tips are just the long part of a transfer pipette cut off from the bulb part. You just fit them over the tip of the squeeze bottle tightly, some people like to tape them with electrical tape but I was able to just push them on hard and they stayed there. I was careful when squeezing though, last thing I wanted was for the tip to blast off under pressure.
 

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The extension tips are just the long part of a transfer pipette cut off from the bulb part. You just fit them over the tip of the squeeze bottle tightly, some people like to tape them with electrical tape but I was able to just push them on hard and they stayed there. I was careful when squeezing though, last thing I wanted was for the tip to blast off under pressure.
Thanks! Good to have options. Either way - more shopping!
 
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