Issues with Silicone Molds

Discussion in 'Lye-Based Soap Forum' started by SoapSap, Jun 16, 2017.

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  1. Jun 16, 2017 #1

    SoapSap

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    I have several Silcone loaf soap molds. I have three 10" Crafter Choice loaf molds and one tall skinny one from Bramble Berry.

    After several uses they seem to be more difficult to unmold. The silky smooth finish seems to have diminished. I don't know if this is the problem or not. I clean then in the sink with warm soapy dish water and dry them well. But I still have soap batter residue that remains.

    Am I doing something wrong? How do others clean their molds and is there a reason why they do not release as well as they did when brand new?

    I know I could line these molds with freezer paper but I would be defeating the reason I chose silicone molds in the grist place.
     
  2. Jun 16, 2017 #2

    navigator9

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    The molds you're talking about are stand alone molds. They're made of a stiffer kind of silicone, so that they don't need a box to support them. I have the one from Crafter's Choice, and I rarely use it, because if find it so difficult to unmold soap from it. The kind of silicone molds that I use most and love, are the ones that do need a box for support. The silicone these molds are made of is softer and more flexible and a dream to unmold soap from.
     
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  3. Jun 16, 2017 #3

    shunt2011

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    I'm with navigator9 on this. I have several of the Crafter's choice molds. I've used one once and had a hard time getting the soap out. I much prefer my wood log molds that have silicone liners. I have 6 of the Brambleberry 5 lbs and 6 of hte Nurture Soap 7 lbs. The Brambleberry ones I had first and find them a bit small but they work. I don't use them often anymore. I love the Nurture ones. the soap always comes out with no issue.
     
  4. Jun 16, 2017 #4

    BrewerGeorge

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    I confess that I don't understand when people say they have trouble getting soap out of these molds. All you have to do is sort of break the seal and let air down below the bottom. If the soap doesn't gel, or I don't wait long enough before unmolding I might leave a corner behind in the mold, but those are MY fault.
     
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  5. Jun 16, 2017 #5

    dibbles

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    navigator and shunt are exactly right. I bought a Crafter's Choice mold when I first started making soap because of the price, and I didn't know if I would even like making soap. Once it became apparent that I would love soap making - after about 2 batches - I bought a Nurture loaf mold. It was one of the best decisions I've ever made. I don't have a Bramble Berry loaf mold, but I do have a slab mold with a silicone liner which also works very well. I can't even remember the last time I used my CC mold. I don't sell, so I just make one smallish batch at a time.
     
  6. Jun 16, 2017 #6

    dibbles

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    I think it's because the silicone is so much stiffer than those that are silicone liners for a wood mold. I can get the soap out of the CC mold, but it is harder. Your hand size and strength might make a difference too.
     
  7. Jun 16, 2017 #7

    lenarenee

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    I've found that my cc 1501, 1504, tall n skinny, AND the silicone molds with wood box eventually all get to the point where the corners and edges are more difficult to unmold well.

    Many times I should have waited to unmold. But I also blame the residue that is left behind that doesn't wash off with hot water and non Dawn detergent. Mine all have a white haze left behind that I'll manually scrub with a rough rag to remove as much as I can. None perform as well as when they were new.

    Taking a q-tip dipped on Vaseline to rub in the corners and edges helps a lot.
    As does refrigerating for at least 4 hours before unmolding.
     
  8. Jun 16, 2017 #8

    navigator9

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    George, I'm wondering if you have any of the softer type silicone molds that we're talking about. I'm thinking that maybe it's just that you've never unmolded soap out of one of them, because there is such a big difference. With the CC mold, I can barely pull the sides away at all to break the seal. They're so stiff, they will barely budge. And then when I turn it over, I have to push and push so hard with my thumbs, that I end up denting the soap because I've pushed so hard! Maybe you need to make a video showing us how you do it. :)
     
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  9. Jun 16, 2017 #9

    BrewerGeorge

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    This might have something to do with it, too. Because we have softened water they clean up squeaky clean very easily with no residue.
     
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  10. Jun 16, 2017 #10

    SoapSap

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    If I put a little Vaseline on the bottom oh the mold would that be safe to try? Or a little pure glycerin?

    I cannot afford to simply scrap these molds and buy new wooden molds with thin silicone liners. I have to salvage what I already own.
     
  11. Jun 16, 2017 #11

    Britannic

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    You might try food grade silicon spray in the mould, before the soap is poured into it. I'm sure vaseline would work as well.
     
  12. Jun 17, 2017 #12

    BattleGnome

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    Mineral oil might work, since it doesn't saponify...

    I don't sell, so the corners don't bother me as much (I'm more worrrued about a straight cut). I find the best way for me to get the soap out is to have a flat top a bit lower than the mold top. After everything seems to have firmed up I break the seals the let it sit another day (to let the sides firm up more). When I think it's ready I turn it upside down and push with my palms, then hope gravity is working. After the soap drops even with the top of the mold I worry it out a bit. My issue is that the top will be where I want it but the bottom/lower sides will still be very soft like play doh or clay. I got a silicone slab mold and had the same clay like softness on the bottom as I do with my log molds. The slab mold was easier because the ratio of firm to soft soap was easier to work with.

    I can't help you with the residues. I find it doesn't effect the final soap and otherwise ignore it. Occasionally I get mad my molds aren't pretty but it's not enough to do much about it.
     
  13. Jun 17, 2017 #13

    NsMar42111

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    I love the crafter's choice molds, I have a bunch of them. However, I do hot process. On the occasion I do cold process, I do find I have to wait longer to unmold or resort to the freezer. Might have to get a few of the floppy style if I do more CP!

    The residue I will scrub off with a plastic scrubby or a light touch with a sponge-I notice it comes out more when I do CP than HP so maybe it's leftover something....
     
  14. Jun 17, 2017 #14

    reinbeau

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    I also prefer the silicone molds that need wooden supports if I'm going to use silicone. I find the combination insulates well, getting my soap to gel completely (I prefer gel). I actually have lots of wood molds with no liners, I still like freezer paper - I know, I know, I'm nuts, but I don't mind lining them at all.
     
  15. Jun 17, 2017 #15

    GingerL

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    I'm with BrewerGeorge on this. If I wait long enough (24 hours mostly) I can break the seal and unmold with no missing corners. That being said, I am often impatient and suffer the consequences.
     
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  16. Jun 17, 2017 #16

    Zany_in_CO

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    ^^^^^ Ditto. I'm even experiencing a loss of hand strength lately and I don't have a problem unmolding. I have CC's 1501 and a few individual cavity circles of different sizes and rectangles. With those, I pull from the sides while I press up from the bottom... they usually fall out without much help.

    ^^^^^ Ditto.

    I use mineral oil to lightly grease my silicone molds... I get nice sharp edges... but I don't always bother with it -- not necessary.
     
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  17. Jun 17, 2017 #17

    TheDragonGirl

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    The only time I have any trouble with corners is when they didnt gel all the way through, otherwise I get nice clean lines every time, without anything to lubricate the molds with. Are you sure its set enough when you go to remove it?
     
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  18. Jun 17, 2017 #18

    anshika154

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    Try thin coating of mineral oil
     
  19. Jun 26, 2017 #19

    jod58

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    How long should cp stay in the mold. I noticed mine are soft and dent. I wait 24 to 48 hours!
     
  20. Jun 26, 2017 #20

    BattleGnome

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    It all depends on where you are and what formula you're using. I've had loafs in the mold for up to 5 days and they still needed a day to air out before cutting.

    Things that can help are: CPOP, salt, sodium lactate, and hard oils
     
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