Issues with heat transfer method

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Obsidian

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I made a large batch of unscented, uncolored soap with my 50% lard recipe. I decided to use the heat transfer method so I wouldn't have to wait on the lye to cool.

I did warm up the lard since it was refrigerated, I then used the SB to get most of the oils to a sludgy consistency before adding the hot lye.

Everything looked good, poured at light trace only to have a few blobs of unmelted lard plop into the mold.
I used a spatula to smash all I could find and stirred until I didn't see anymore.

If there is any lard bits left, what can I expect when I cut? If the lard is obvious, I will dig out as much as possible.

Would forcing gel help at all?
 

AliOop

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I can't answer your main questions, but will say that I have heard people say that heat xfer doesn't work as well for large batches. My largest batch using that method has probably been 6 lbs, and while I've never had any lard blobs, I can see how that might happen. I do hand-stir in the hot lye solution, and am pretty diligent about making sure all lumps are gone before I start stick-blending.

Given that you blended to light trace, is it possible that some of the lard saponified into soapy lumps?
 

Obsidian

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Its not a very large batch, just big for me at a little under 4 lbs.
I think most the blobs came from the scrapings inside the bowl. I didn't think to scrape down the bowl after adding the lye.
They were definitely lard bits, not soap lumps. I watched one melt in the mold.
 

The Efficacious Gentleman

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It should (hopefully) be limited to a few bars, depending on the shape of the mould of course. Still, those people who are anti-lard because of the thought of rubbing lard on their bodies would not like these bars..................... :D

I did heat transfer once on a tooth soap and it struggled to melt the cocao butter, so I feel for you.
 

Arimara

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It should (hopefully) be limited to a few bars, depending on the shape of the mould of course. Still, those people who are anti-lard because of the thought of rubbing lard on their bodies would not like these bars..................... :D

I did heat transfer once on a tooth soap and it struggled to melt the cocao butter, so I feel for you.
Nice to see you again and my face is the only part of me that HATES lard based soaps. It's a great body soap for me.
 

TheGecko

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Would forcing gel help at all?
Depending on the size of the blobs,I can see forcing gel melting the blobs and at least allowing some of the load to be absorbed, but on time will tell.

I cut my Cocoa and Shea Butters into small bits when using HTM, but I know Julie at Ophelia’s Soapery does large batches with large chunks...it just takes patience and lots of stirring.
 

Obsidian

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It seems I didn't need to worry, all the bars look great. They did gel, maybe that helped, I don't know.

I don't think I'll use the heat transfer method again. I did it it to save time, next time I'll just make my lye sooner.
 

TheGecko

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I don't think I'll use the heat transfer method again. I did it it to save time, next time I'll just make my lye sooner.
It is definitely a great time saver if you are doing simple soaps, though Julie seems to have master the use of it. For me, it seems to lessen the working time I have.

I've recently gotten into master batching via Lisa at I Dream In Soap and for the first time, I can actually make soap during the week if I want to because the bulk of the measuring, melting and mixing is done already. All I need to do is measure out my oil/butter mixture and my lye solution and do the do-wah-ditty.

I'm doing it a little more large scale than she shows in her video, but I make more soap. I use a five gallon, food-grade bucket to store my oil/butter mixture and two, 1-gallon jugs to store my lye solution in...about 58 lbs worth of soap.
 

Obsidian

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I don't soap enough to masterbatch. I could go months between batches. It would definitely be a time saver if I ever started soaping regularly again.
 

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