Is my formula ok?

SoapMakingForum

Help Support SoapMakingForum:

Doutor2

Member
Joined
Oct 17, 2016
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
Hi,

I ve been using the same recipe for a while.
I use 400g coconut oil and 350g of sunflower oil and the soap calculador says the parameters are ok.
My problem is...
My soap solidifies very quickly and when I transfer it to the molds it is already thick. Should I lower the percentage of coconut oil?

I appreciate any advise
 

lsg

Staff member
Admin
Moderator
Joined
Oct 14, 2007
Messages
14,585
Reaction score
5,972
Unless you are using high oleic sunflower oil, you may have a problem with DOS. You are also using over 50% coconut oil which may be drying. You will have lots of bubbly lather, but not much creamy lather
 

shunt2011

Moderator Emeritus
Moderator Emeritus
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Apr 2, 2012
Messages
15,448
Reaction score
9,735
Location
Michigan
I agree with lsg. I personally would do a different recipe. One that's more balanced, less stripping and less prone to rancidity.
 

IrishLass

Staff member
Admin
Moderator
Joined
Feb 11, 2008
Messages
17,291
Reaction score
11,093
Location
Right here, silly!
Welcome Douter2! :wave:

I make a few formulas with really high coconut- one with 100% and the other with with 70% and they make wonderfully bubbly/creamy soaps that feel good to my skin.....provided that my superfat is high enough (15% to 20%) to compensate for over-cleansing and other certain things, of course. lol

Having said that, though, I agree with the others- if you are using regular sunflower oil (as opposed to high-oleic sunflower oil), it will be more vulnerable to rancidity (DOS). Using high oleic sunflower oil would greatly lessen that probability for you.

RE: the quick-thickening of your batter..... I personally never have unusually quick-thickening batter in my high coconut soaps unless I'm using an ornery FO, and or a steep water discount. How much water are you using in your formula, and what (if any) fragrance oil are you using?


IrishLass :)
 

lenarenee

Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2014
Messages
3,711
Reaction score
3,323
Perhaps it's only a matter of over stick blending, which is possible no matter the recipe.
 

Doutor2

Member
Joined
Oct 17, 2016
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
1- Thanks for the advice about the sunflower oil. I'll start to buy high oleic sunflower oil (although Im thinking about producing this oil at home, directly from sunflower seed). I deal with the rancidity problem by covering the soap with plastic and it works (no contact with O2).
2- About the fast solidification. I use 285g of water. 400 coconut, 350 sunflower oil. 114 NaOH. And I use about 10-15mL of jasmin, eucalyptus or lavender essences. I can see that my trace is a very light one, I just see the fluid marks of my mixer in the batter when I lift it (that's where I stop). Still, when I start to transfer it to my 18 molds, it gets thicker and thicker as I keep filling the molds. I still believe its not just overmixing... possibly I should have more time with a nice liquid batter. You have any idea how?
 

Dahila

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2013
Messages
2,622
Reaction score
1,840
Location
Canada, Ontario
covering the soap with plastic will maybe help with ash no the rancidity "having a rank, unpleasant, stale smell or taste, as through decomposition, especially of fats or oils:
rancid butter."
It is cool that you can produce your own oil:) Jasmine, Lavender will accelerate the trace
BTW welcome to the forum ;)
 

lsg

Staff member
Admin
Moderator
Joined
Oct 14, 2007
Messages
14,585
Reaction score
5,972
If you are producing your own oil, you could try adding rosemary oleoresin to your soap to help prevent DOS. Rosemary oleoresin is a natural antioxidant ingredient that will help prolong the shelf-life of oils.
 

shunt2011

Moderator Emeritus
Moderator Emeritus
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Apr 2, 2012
Messages
15,448
Reaction score
9,735
Location
Michigan
As stated, florals will make your soap move faster. It's normal for the batter to get thicker as you pour. I generally just give it a stir and it helps keep it a bit more fluid. Some florals will give you soap on a stick.
 

IrishLass

Staff member
Admin
Moderator
Joined
Feb 11, 2008
Messages
17,291
Reaction score
11,093
Location
Right here, silly!
I can see that my trace is a very light one, I just see the fluid marks of my mixer in the batter when I lift it (that's where I stop). Still, when I start to transfer it to my 18 molds, it gets thicker and thicker as I keep filling the molds. I still believe its not just overmixing... possibly I should have more time with a nice liquid batter. You have any idea how?
18 molds- aha- that explains it! I only ever use one log mold or 1 slab mold at a time, which makes pouring a quick, smooth breeze.

If it were me, this is what I would try: I would take note of however many molds I was able to pour into before the batter started getting too thick (and how many grams of batter it took to pour into those molds). For example sake, let's say you are able to pour 586 grams of scented batter into 9 molds before it starts getting too thick. The next time I soaped I would divide the batter in half and then scent and pour only one half before scenting and pouring the other half. That should buy you some time.


IrishLass :)
 

Dahila

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2013
Messages
2,622
Reaction score
1,840
Location
Canada, Ontario
the most I poured was one color soap -6 lb , at the time of course. I try to make more but I use seperate containers to mix two soaps at the time, With the swirl I make one mold, then have ready few others,
18 molds eh
 

shunt2011

Moderator Emeritus
Moderator Emeritus
Lifetime Supporter
Joined
Apr 2, 2012
Messages
15,448
Reaction score
9,735
Location
Michigan
I couldn't do 18 either. I do 1 12lb or 2 6lb at the most at one time. Unless you are doing individual bars then that's doable but still a lot if your relatively new.
 

DeeAnna

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2013
Messages
13,470
Reaction score
19,381
Location
USA
"...I deal with the rancidity problem by covering the soap with plastic and it works (no contact with O2)...."

That's only one route for fats or soap to oxidize (react with oxygen) to become rancid. Soap contains water and can hydrolyze (react with water) to become rancid by that route. Although it's not an issue for unused soap, bacteria can cause oxidation/hydrolysis of soap and fats as well. Also trace metals catalyze oxidation and hydrolysis.
 

Latest posts

Top