Is it okay to start making liquid soap as a beginner?

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Twista

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Hi, I am looking to start making liquid soap, like a body wash, and I was wondering if it is okay to start making liquid soap as a beginner? I've watched a couple of Youtube videos about this, but they give no measurements and they say "do not try this if you have no experience making soap." I just want yall's opinions.
 

Earthen_Step

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Although I have not made it yet since I am less interested... I would say go for it! If I were more interested in liquid soap I would have 100% started with it. Just my 2 possibly worthless cents :p

*I would have read multiple books and many online tutorials before hand though. Just like I did with CP soaps.
 

IrishLass

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This is just my opinion (others may disagree), but for what it's worth, I make both and I see no reason why you shouldn't be able to start with liquid soap. Both have their own quirks and cautions, but as long as you do your research well beforehand and take all the safety precautions, I don't see why you should have to make CP first. After all, you're going to be working with potentially dangerous chemicals and observing chemical reactions either way.


IrishLass :)
 
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I am going to be very cautious and say that it depends on the process you are planning to use. If you are going to use the old fashioned lye excess, neutralize, then use a sequestering agent, then yes, you need to make CP or HP first. If you are going to use the newer, more streamlined process of making liquid soap, then go for it. There is just no reason not to.

A few "do's" first:
*Do follow safety instructions carefully.
*Do have the proper equipment. A good digital scale is NOT optional.
*Do your homework and watch lots of videos on what the stages are going to look like.
*Do choose a reputable lye calculator and learn to use it yourself.
*Do come run your recipe and process by the smart folks like IrishLass, DeeAnna, and FGOriold before making it. They rock on this stuff, and can spot issues before you waste supplies and/or make an unsafe soap.
 

DeeAnna

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Okay, I'm gonna toot Susie's horn here, since she's too modest to toot it herself -- she is one of my LS heroines. I really appreciate her sensible, efficient answers. I might be the local soapy math & science geek, but I still count myself a rank newbie at LS. :)
 

Seawolfe

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I think that since hot process is considered suitable for newbies, then the simplified LS process should be fine too - there is some really great info in the Liquid Soap forum threads. And you have the advantage of being able to use your LS right after dilution. Just be very systematic in your safety and your plan.

Oh and +1 to what DeeAnna says - just go read Susies posts about Liquid Soap - she is teaching us all to be more zen-like about it.
 

Twista

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Thanks guys for the replies. (that rhymed lol) When using a stainless steel pot can you reuse it for cooking/normal use? I plan on using my mom's stainless steel pot, but I want to make sure that I am not going to ruin it.
 
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Uhm...I would not. You can go to your local thrift stores to see if they have any old stainless steel pots or bowls. Bring a magnet with you to be sure it is real steel and not aluminum. Look around for old crock pots and stick blenders while you are there. If you can't find stainless there, I noticed Walmart had a 4 piece stainless steel bowl/colander set online for $19 or $20 yesterday. You could grab a set of those, or go to Walmart and get a cheap stainless steel pot for $7-$10.

The lye/soap won't "ruin" the pot that I know of, but I would err on the side of caution and use a separate pot just for soap. Besides, you don't need anything causing friction between you and your mom.

Do read The Efficacious Gentleman's article about equipment, it is a good one. Thorough yet easy to read without overwhelming you with information.

Also go to the dollar stores in your area. Look for plastic mixing cups with a 5 in the little triangle on the bottom, plastic spoons, gloves, safety glasses(NOT optional), and silicone spatulas. You are going to want to get some sort of container to hold all your soaping equipment unless you can dedicate a cabinet or closet to the endeavor. Buy one large enough to hold everything with a bit of room left over for all the goodies you are going to find absolutely necessary.

Get yourself a good digital scale. This is the one item I am going to tell you to buy the most expensive one you can afford. You must have one that can change from ounces to grams if you are in the US, but if elsewhere, just grams is sufficient. Having one with no auto turn off is optional, but would be wonderful.(Wish I had known such existed when I bought mine!)

You are probably thinking that you are going to just try this this one time, so none of this is necessary, right? I would be remiss if I did not warn you now that soapmaking is addictive. And, since you are already on this forum, you are probably already addicted. So, you may as well go ahead and get some dedicated equipment.
 
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Meganmischke

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Personally I use my stainless steel tools and equipment for soap and food use. Gasp, the horror. As long as you clean it after soaping I don't see how it could cause any issues. I have never had any problems with stainless. Just don't use wood plastic or anything else for food after soaping with it.
 

Seawolfe

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Well, its one thing to use your own gear for both soap and food (I do), but its another thing to use someone elses :)
I would say that a crockpot is pretty necessary for making liquid soap. That is one thing that I don't mind using for both soap and food, because at the end there is soap in it and it washes out nice and clean.
 

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