Interesting pour method - jagged pattern

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Navaria

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Has anyone ever used guttering as a mould?
That is one cool looking soap! When I read your post about the guttering tho, I thought you were crazy lol.I was thinking actual guttering! And then I clicked your link. You, my dear, aren't crazy. You're a freaking genius! I would think vinyl downspout would make an awesome mold! I never in a million years would have thought about that. The best part is, they make end caps that would work as the base! I'm gonna have to get me some of that!!:thumbup:
 

navigator9

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A milk carton would work as a tear away mold. The only problem with them, is that the sides bow when filled. You would need to build a wooden box for it to prevent that. Is there a video on that page to show how the pour is done? Did I miss it?
 

Saponista

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There's no video, sorry nav. From the picture it looks like you pour from either side of the mould while tipping it at an angle each time. Kind of like a tall and skinny shimmy. That's what I had guessed anyway, I really want to see if I can make it work, I think I might have to go and buy some gutter. Problem is I don't need metres of it. Wonder if I can find a builder who would give me a spare bit.
 

dixiedragon

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I use vinyl downspouts. You need to grease them REALLY well with mineral oil. Put a sandwich bag over the end and secure it with tape. Run the tape across the bottom to support the bag. Also wrap it around the downspout as much as possible to seal it. If you don't, the weight of the soap will push down through the bottom of the top and ooze out of the sides of the baggie. Ask me how I know.

The real challenge here is unmolding. The downspout is slippery and hard to grip. You will need a wooden dowel to help you push. I have considered getting my downspouts really really REALLY clean again, then somehow securing something to the outside to provide grip. Not sure what though.
 

Guspuppy

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What about the strips of adhesive sandpaper type stuff they sell to line steps? My friend have those on their porch and that adhesive GRIPS. For years, even in rain and snow and snow melting chemicals!
 

dixiedragon

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There's no video, sorry nav. From the picture it looks like you pour from either side of the mould while tipping it at an angle each time. Kind of like a tall and skinny shimmy. That's what I had guessed anyway, I really want to see if I can make it work, I think I might have to go and buy some gutter. Problem is I don't need metres of it. Wonder if I can find a builder who would give me a spare bit.
At our big-box hardware stores they sell short (1-2 feet) lengths of gutter as downspouts.
 

penelopejane

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Yes I use a round one of those. 65mm diameter and 20mm diameter for embeds. I line both with a sheet of silicone for a good finish.

You could use a milk carton too. I don't think people line them.
 

HappyBeeSoapCo

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I've used milk cartons before. They work fine, are free, and are disposable. What's not to like? They give an interesting circular swirl that I can actually do using gm, honey and beeswax which are all swirl killers :) you can see what I mean in this example, (sorry for poor picture quality), this batch moved so fast I got really "blobby" swirls. Previous batch they were finer and more concentric but I couldn't find a pic right now. That actually might help make the design you're referring to, it would not be too fluid :twisted:

Only negative is they don't have sharp sides and they have to be cleaned up around the edges as you can see. The soap picks up every seam in the carton :(
But.....I've been meaning to try using this milk carton holder called a maito purkkin kadin. They're really old-fashioned so I'm not sure I can still buy one but they're just wooden so I think I can make one. Anyway, it would keep the milk carton sides straighter.

Ok now I might have to try it!

image.jpg


image.jpeg
 

Saponista

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Oooh I really like that swirl pattern you get with the cartons, beautiful!!! I think I will give it a go, but we don't get our milk in cartons in the UK so I think I would have to use a square soy milk carton type thing. The ones with a plastic screw cap on top.
 

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