Infusing oils

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RevolutionSoap

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I'm just starting to experiment with infusing olive oil with herbs from my garden and local area. So far I have some lavender and meadow sage drying. I'm not entirely sure what those yellow flowers are :) 20200704_173439.jpg

What have you infused successfully? And did you infuse it dry or fresh?
 

RevolutionSoap

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Thanks for that information. I watched a video on making Dandelion oil and they used fresh. But I can see how that could be a bad idea.
 

Obsidian

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If you were going to hot infuse and use the oil within a day or two, I suppose fresh would be ok.
If you are going to cold infuse, it will sit around for weeks and needs dry.
 

Todd Ziegler

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I'm just starting to experiment with infusing olive oil with herbs from my garden and local area. So far I have some lavender and meadow sage drying. I'm not entirely sure what those yellow flowers are :) View attachment 47533

What have you infused successfully? And did you infuse it dry or fresh?
I have always used dry material and I let them sit for about 30 days. I shake them every few days so that I get a better infusion.
 

Obsidian

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I have always used dry material and I let them sit for about 30 days. I shake them every few days so that I get a better infusion.
Thats how I do it to. If I'm in a hurry, I will do the simmer a jar in warm water but I find it doesn't make as strong of a infusion.
I actually need to get some calendula going so I can make soap sometime this summer.
 

penelopejane

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I use a dehydrator to dry seaweed. I’m too impatient to wait for it to dry out.

When making an infusion I use the low heat method with a ss bowl over just simmering water. Again because I’m impatient to try whatever new soaping idea I have.
:computerbath:
 

Elizevt

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I wonder if you can infuse the dandelions in the water part of the soap mixture.
Make a dandelion tea using warm distilled water. Let it seep well and then mix the dandelion tea with the Lye before mixing it with the oils.
Maybe then you can do a double infusion. Infuse the water part and the oil part of your recipe.

I'm a total noob here, so I'm just speculating.
 

Iluminameluna

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I wonder if you can infuse the dandelions in the water part of the soap mixture.
Make a dandelion tea using warm distilled water. Let it seep well and then mix the dandelion tea with the Lye before mixing it with the oils.
Maybe then you can do a double infusion. Infuse the water part and the oil part of your recipe.

I'm a total noob here, so I'm just speculating.
@Elizevt I do this quite often with my chamomile soaps, a favorite of my family. When I add the dry flowers to my oils I also add some turmeric and annatto, to accentuate the orange-tan color, then make a strong chamomile infusion when it comes time to make the soap. I keep the flowers instead of straining them out. I've found that the family likes the slight exfoliating effect they have when bathing.
Edited to add: I wouldn't use warn water to make your dandelion infusion. You wouldn't get much from the plant that way. Use boiling water as you would to make any tea. Create your soap recipe and see how much liquid your recipe requires, then add that much plus maybe an ounce or two more for what you'll lose to the plant from straining it. Or if you're using grams, add 30 to 60 grams more. Just my suggestion. You don't need to chill the resulting tea, but I'd strongly suggest you'd at least let it come to room temp. I usually leave my chamomile infusion in the fridge the night before, but that's just me, and only because I live in San Antonio, TX where it's usually in the 90's and I have to soap outside.
Happy soaping, and welcome to the addictive world of soap!
 
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God~Given Gifts

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Hello to all! I'm new here! Does the smell of the herbs and roses actually last in the soap? I use only essential oils to fragrance and was wondering about making hydrosols. I wasn't sure if the scent would last. But I hadn't thought about herb infused oils in soap. Thanks
 

Obsidian

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Hello to all! I'm new here! Does the smell of the herbs and roses actually last in the soap? I use only essential oils to fragrance and was wondering about making hydrosols. I wasn't sure if the scent would last. But I hadn't thought about herb infused oils in soap. Thanks
No, the scent of infusions, teas and hydrosols won't survive the lye.
 

Iluminameluna

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No, the scent of infusions, teas and hydrosols won't survive the lye.
Actually, @Obsidian, even though the whole scent of the chamomile doesn't survive the saponification process, maybe because I add the infused oils, a strong water infusion (about 1 tbsp to e/oz of water) then stick blend the flowers into the oils before adding the lye, there is a faint honey scent to the soaps even after 3 months of cure when I don't use anything that has a scent at all. Or hardly a scent, like lard. I wouldn't advertise it, of course, but it's one of the reasons my kids like the addition of it. They call it butterscotch.
 

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