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Stacyspy

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...are showing people adding water to HP during coloring to make it pour more like CP. What are the pros and cons to this?
I've always just made my soap the way I was taught years ago...lol...and I thought I'd watch a few videos to see what new things I can learn... and I never learned that technique.

[ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bO6M3tdN4hU[/ame]
This is one of the links, it looks like she reserves half of the water from the start, adds salt and sugar, then uses it to thin out the soap after. Since it's not really adding any extra water, would it still warp or/or shrink? I guess it won't hurt to try it in a small batch....
 
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I am no HP expert. Haven't yet tried sodium lactate. I do make my water 40% to make it a bit smoother to pour. Some people get warping and one soaper commented that using a high water rate means you will loose more fragrance as the soap cures, I assume b/c the evaporating water carries some FO with it?
 
Pros: smoother texture, more fluid pour means easier to swirl

Cons: can take longer to harden/dry out (NOT the same as cure), can cause warping and shrinking. I hadn't heard about losing more fragrance, so not sure about that one.
 
ETA- I addded one of the links I watched, and a short synopsis of what she said. Any help would be appreciated :) Thanks
 
HP with added water

If I where to do this I think I would reserve some of the water needed for the batch. This would allow me to add some more water back into the Batch. This would make more sense to me.

I am not sure if adding extra water without accounting for lye would make any sense.

Does anyone else follow my madness :)
 
She is using 50% water to oils, thats quite a lot regardless of when its added. I really do think the soap would warp with a proper cure. If you read the comments, she uses her soap immediately so she might not be aware of how it warps.

I've made HP with 40% water and SL, it stayed plenty smooth and was pourable. I have to ask though, if you want fluid batter to swirl, why not just do CP?

I've swirled my HP like this
[ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ui1atWMtCwM[/ame]
 
She is using 50% water to oils, thats quite a lot regardless of when its added. I really do think the soap would warp with a proper cure. If you read the comments, she uses her soap immediately so she might not be aware of how it warps.

I've made HP with 40% water and SL, it stayed plenty smooth and was pourable. I have to ask though, if you want fluid batter to swirl, why not just do CP?

I've swirled my HP like this
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ui1atWMtCwM

I'm doing an experiment, really... I wanted to see the difference in my new colors between CP, HP, and the water added batch...see the difference in shades and amounts used.
I watched the video you posted a while back, and I like how it looks, and I've done a few loaves that way.

If I where to do this I think I would reserve some of the water needed for the batch. This would allow me to add some more water back into the Batch. This would make more sense to me.

I am not sure if adding extra water without accounting for lye would make any sense.

Does anyone else follow my madness :)

That was my madness also...lol
I did 40% water, and reserved half the amount...then as the video said, she added 1 tsp ea. salt and sugar to help it harden. I mixed my colors, added the scented batter, and the extra water didn't really help. I still had to glop it in the mold, like usual. So the whole extra water thing didn't really work the way I did it.
 
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I dont HP, but I found this over on Millers pages..{HPOP}
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http://www.millersoap.com/trouble.html

I am not sure why everyone hates rebatching so much. I actually make large blocks of CP soap for the express purpose of rebatching to add more delicate ingredients/oils that won't survive lye. I make basic goat's milk CP soap with shea butter as my base. When I am ready to re-batch, I cut the soap into small chunks (about 1/2 in cubes), place them in my stainless steel "soap" pot and pour over the selected liquid. I use about 1/2 c. to 2-1/2 lbs of fresh base. Base that is older or more cured needs a little more liquid. I then cover the pot and place in my oven at 250 degrees. You must be patient in this process. The soap will again completely gel but it takes a while. If the soap starts to dry out too much, sprinkle a little more liquid on the top and stir gently. When most of my soap has returned to a gel state, I take it out of the oven and run my stick blender through it to crush any remaining chunks. Back to the oven it goes for another 30 mins. or so. It should now be completely liquid and smooth. Add any new oils, ingredients and fragrance and mix well with your stick blender. Pour (yes, it actually pours!) into prepared mold and set aside to cool for 24-48 hours. Once it has cooled and hardened, I turn it out from the mold, cut (as I use a loaf mold) and allow to dry until the soap is nice and hard. My rebatch bars look as smooth and nice as my CP soap. From reading numerous sites with instructions for re-batching, it looks like the soap is not allowed to melt completely resulting in a lumpy or "rustic" look. My method may take longer but you can have nice smooth, beautiful bars with ingredients too fragile to survive sopanification not to mention that the fragrances are much stronger with less fragrance or essential oils. As I have only been making soaps for a few years now, I know that there are much more experienced soapers out there who may disagree but this method has worked well for me.& nbsp; By the way, I do not have any warping or shrinking of the bars with this method either. ~Sharon Marshall
 
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