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myummeen

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I really want differentiate between cold and hot processes for making soap.
Thank you so much I really learn a lot from this forum.
 

MelissaG

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Hot process uses a crockpot an you cook it to the point it's ready. Cold process doesn't. That's the easiest way.
 
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Hot process does involve cooking the soap batter, but it doesn't have to be in a crockpot. I typically use the stove-top or the microwave, because I hate using the heavy ceramic crock liner, which is very hard on my wrists. I also hate degrading the crockpot liner with caustic batter and stick-blender abrasions.

Adding heat to the batter helps it saponify more quickly so that all of the lye is neutralized. You can do that via hot processing, or you can make a cold process soap, and place that in a warm oven, or on a heating pad, or just cover it so that the heat generated by saponification is trapped around the soap mold.

Some folks love hot process because they like knowing that the lye is neutralized by the time they put the batter in the mold. Others prefer cold process because the soap batter is fluid, lending itself to more intricate molds, or designs in the soap. Both processes make perfectly good soap.

No matter what anyone tells you, hot processed soap should still be cured. It may be safe to use immediately, but it is not ideal. You can read more about that in other threads here that talk about curing soap.
 

myummeen

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Hot process does involve cooking the soap batter, but it doesn't have to be in a crockpot. I typically use the stove-top or the microwave, because I hate using the heavy ceramic crock liner, which is very hard on my wrists. I also hate degrading the crockpot liner with caustic batter and stick-blender abrasions.

Adding heat to the batter helps it saponify more quickly so that all of the lye is neutralized. You can do that via hot processing, or you can make a cold process soap, and place that in a warm oven, or on a heating pad, or just cover it so that the heat generated by saponification is trapped around the soap mold.

Some folks love hot process because they like knowing that the lye is neutralized by the time they put the batter in the mold. Others prefer cold process because the soap batter is fluid, lending itself to more intricate molds, or designs in the soap. Both processes make perfectly good soap.

No matter what anyone tells you, hot processed soap should still be cured. It may be safe to use immediately, but it is not ideal. You can read more about that in other threads here that talk about curing soap.
Great! Thanks so much for replying
 

DeeAnna

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Hot process is the method where the soap is fully saponified before it is put into a mold. The soap maker puts the ingredients in an appropriate container and adds heat to saponify the soap. There are many ways to heat the soap to "cook" it -- crock pot, bain marie (hot water bath), oven, stove top, microwave, etc. When the soap is cooked and fully saponified, the soap is put into a mold to cool.

Cold process is the method where the soap saponifies after it's put into the mold. The soap maker may warm the fats to ensure they are melted, but otherwise the ingredients can all be at room temperature. The soap maker does not use added heat to "cook" the soap before it is put into the mold as is done with hot process.
 

myummeen

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Hot process is the method where the soap is fully saponified before it is put into a mold. The soap maker puts the ingredients in an appropriate container and adds heat to saponify the soap. There are many ways to heat the soap to "cook" it -- crock pot, bain marie (hot water bath), oven, stove top, microwave, etc. When the soap is cooked and fully saponified, the soap is put into a mold to cool.

Cold process is the method where the soap saponifies after it's put into the mold. The soap maker may warm the fats to ensure they are melted, but otherwise the ingredients can all be at room temperature. The soap maker does not use added heat to "cook" the soap before it is put into the mold as is done with hot process.
Thanks
 

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