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I abandoned heating oil

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zolveria

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I have successfully used the heat of the lye to melt my hard oils.

Love this process much better. so many years heating oils.

Just made 2 batches
one Sea Salt and Sand Soap

and My very famour Rosemary Rosemary Soap :)
 

The Efficacious Gentleman

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Indeed! I was so glad when I tried that at the suggestion of Susie and others here. Certainly saves a bit of time and energy
 

Susie

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You will need to pre-heat the solid oils in the cooler months(I do, even in the deep south.), but yes, it saves time and energy! And I got it from someone else, I promise, I did not invent it.
 

Susie

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I melt my lard and CO in cooler months. My house needs to be at least 73F to not have to melt oils. I keep the house 68F in the winter.
 

not_ally

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Susie, how does this work w/your recipes (even in the summer) w/so much lard? Ie; W/mine - 65-75 % lard usually - there just seems too much of it to get melted by the lye water. It's warm enough here now that the CO is liquid at RT, but I still have to melt those big old dollops of lard.

Also, assume this would be hard to do if soaping w/the split method? Again, just seems as if there wouldn't be enough liquid to melt the hard oils.

Do you guys find a benefit other than convenience/speed? I know that I've read that some people find that the thermal transfer method slows trace for some reason, although I don't really understand the mechanics there.
 

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