How to make very thin guest soap

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BattleGnome

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My best guess would be that someone is super talented at cutting and planing. Maybe a recipe with alot of hardness
 

Relle

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To me they look like they have been poured into a round mould very thin not cut.
 

Susie

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I could even suggest that they poured a thin sheet of soap then cut out with a cookie cutter. But I also like the pour a very small amount into circle molds answer.
 

penelopejane

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I could even suggest that they poured a thin sheet of soap then cut out with a cookie cutter. But I also like the pour a very small amount into circle molds answer.
All good suggestions.
Now that you mention it they aren't all the same thickness.
But I guess that could happen with a circle mold or a thin sheet.

But, wouldn't either method result in a bent cake of soap?
When I shave off a bit of soap to straighten a loaf they curl badly.

Maybe a thick mandolin (I have one of those and will give it a try) but that doesn't solce the curling problem.

Jade - the ones on the link you gave a a bit thicker so, while not as uniform, would work really well, I think. Also that would overcome a problem with adding extra salt or something else to produce a hard bar to do a sample.

Soap makers seem to be amazingly inventive and creative!
 

Susie

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I do think that they would have to have SL or salt to make those in a mold. That is sort of why I lean towards the cookie cutter idea. It would not distort the edges if you caught it at the right time.
 

galaxyMLP

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I think Susie is on the right track here. That's what I would do if I wanted thin soap like that. I think pouring the soap in a thin layer on a cookie sheet, letting it harden to a doughy consistency and then removing the excess soap while it's still soft would work best. You could even ball the excess up so you don't waste it. Then after a few days when the soap rounds are hard and don't dent, you can remove them from the sheet.
 

Saponista

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I have done this with smaller shapes like leaves with a fondant cutter and they didn't curl so I am with everyone else on the cookie cutter theory. :)
 

newbie

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She used to be very active on this forum (Amanda Gail) so I would bet if you emailed her, she would tell you what she does. She teaches soaping as well and seems like a very sharing person.
 

penelopejane

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She used to be very active on this forum (Amanda Gail) so I would bet if you emailed her, she would tell you what she does. She teaches soaping as well and seems like a very sharing person.
Amanda Gail got back to me and she said:

I used a silicone muffin mold to make the soaps and a soap slicer that a friend made to shave off the top of the soap. It cuts off slices that are about 1/8".
 

lsg

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They were probably poured in individual round molds at thin trace.
 
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