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How does Apple cider do in CP soap?Heaven if you done this?

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aprice522

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How does Apple cider do in CP soap? I would treat it like beer and freeze it as well substitution for the water
Have you done this?
how does the soap come out?
 

DeeAnna

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This has been discussed quite a bit -- https://www.google.com/search?q=vinegar+in+soap+site:soapmakingforum.com&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8

A modest amount of any acidic ingredient will react with some of the lye. The net effect of this reaction will increase the superfat, but it will NOT reduce the pH of the finished soap. Citric acid in citrus juice ends up as sodium citrate. Lactic acid in yogurt makes sodium lactate. Acetic acid in vinegar makes sodium acetate. Etc.

As in all things, moderation is a good idea. If you add enough acid as was done in the Soaping 101 "make soap with lemons" video, there will not be enough lye left over to actually make soap. You'll end up with an ugly mixture of soap, fatty acid, unreacted fat, etc. In that case, yes, the pH of the "soap" will be reduced ... but you really don't have soap at that point...

At a 5% acetic solution, 30 g of commercial vinegar will neutralize 1 g of NaOH or 1.4 g of KOH. If I use commercial vinegar for all of the "water" in my favorite soap recipe and don't add any extra lye to compensate for the added acid, the vinegar will eat up enough of my soaping lye to increase the superfat from my usual 3% to a substantial 10%.

ETA: I goofed! Aprice is asking about apple cider/juice NOT vinegar. Duh. I'll leave this info about vinegar in case someone can use it, but please understand my post here applies to vinegar, not apple juice.
 
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Susie

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Is this apple cider we are talking about that is basically juice? Or apple cider vinegar?

If it is apple cider, then yes, just freeze and sub for water. Watch for over heating because of the amount of sugar in there. And don't add additional sugar.
 

galaxyMLP

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And here I was thinking of Hard apple cider... I was like "why is Dee mentioning acids?". Now I get it! Apple cider vinegar! Well, I'm now thinking Susie is on the right track. Hmm.
 

aprice522

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DeeAnna--soooo.....is the above answer about the apple cider (juice)--(which ironically a little too "tangy" or fermented but not officially a "hard cider")--or about ACV? (and sorry...I just asked I did not search... :oops::oops:

I never even thought of it as being very acidic, but when you answered-- it made me think duh...
but then when others answered...I am not sure if I should treat it more as a sugar based or is it more acidic??
 

DeeAnna

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Oh, gosh, I misread your original post. I'm blithering on about vinegar, not apple juice (aka cider). Ignore me, please! I don't know what I'm talking about today.
 

Susie

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I would start by getting a good pH meter and knowing what the pH is before proceeding.
 

amd

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I did a batch using half water and half frozen cider - it was a kind of slushy. No problems. I haven't done an all cider yet - its on the list this week!
 

ngian

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A modest amount of any acidic ingredient will react with some of the lye. The net effect of this reaction will increase the superfat, but it will NOT reduce the pH of the finished soap. Citric acid in citrus juice ends up as sodium citrate. Lactic acid in yogurt makes sodium lactate. Acetic acid in vinegar makes sodium acetate. Etc.
So far I know that Sodium Citrate is a good cheelator for hard water issues, sodium Lactate is good for hardness (like salt) and for some more bubbles in the final bar. But what about sodium Acetate? What does it bring to the soap party?

I'm also thinking of making a bar with some part of water with Kombucha tea...

Nikos :)http://www.soapmakingforum.com//www.pinterest.com/pin/create/extension/
 

Susie

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It would be a much weaker chelator in soap. If I had hard water and needed a chelator, I would stick with sodium citrate.
 

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